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Denim Blunders, Reflections and General Nonsense.

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I’ve decided to retire my chromexcel wallet because it had stretched to the point that my drivers license slipped out and got lost. It was a Mitchell’s leather front pocket wallet that I’ve been using for at least 7-8 yrs. Nice wallet but super irritating because over time it will stretch and your cards won’t be secure. At least I didn’t lose my credit cards

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15 hours ago, ColonelAngus said:

I’ve decided to retire my chromexcel wallet because it had stretched to the point that my drivers license slipped out and got lost. It was a Mitchell’s leather front pocket wallet that I’ve been using for at least 7-8 yrs. Nice wallet but super irritating because over time it will stretch and your cards won’t be secure. At least I didn’t lose my credit cards

All leather stretches to some extent but CXL is certainly in the ‘stretchier’ end of the spectrum. 

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On 5/13/2022 at 1:27 PM, julian-wolf said:

Went on a big hunt a while back for replacement bath towels, and ended up settling on a company called Towels By Gus. From what I gathered, they’re one of two or three companies still using the last remaining domestic (to the US) towel, and of the two or three they seemed the least frilly / decorated. Overall, I’ve been extremely happy with them.

Anyway, for anyone who might be in the market: looks like they’re having a pretty big sale right now on the remaining stock of their largest size towel (“bath sheet”, whatever that means). Go wild.

Several years ago I scored some towles f/ BB&B - don't recall the brand/model name (Valkyrie comes to mind, and it was entirely appropriate). They were rather incredible - extremely dense and heavy it was almost unbelievable. very large bath sheets, almost too large. Unlike any other towel I've ever handled. Nothing lasts forever, and BB&B doesn't seem to carry them any longer. 

Last year I was searching for new towels and decided on waffle weave towels by Onsen, to try something different. Apparently JP waffle weave towels are a thing, but are very expensive and hard to find. I bought into the hype about being highly absorbent and quick drying. They do dry quick, but are not highly absorbent. They're very light weight. Being at altitude in the CO Rockies, humidity is very low, so quick drying isn't a concern. Not sure I'd buy them again, or recommend them over regular terry weave towels. Personal preference there... 

One thing that drives me bonkers about towels in the inevitable band set back from the end. The Onsen towels don't have that. You're reco for Towels by Gus doesn't have a band on their Teton collection. Unfortunately the color I'd like is sold out in sets, otherwise I'd prolly cop. 

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I went through a largely similar process—tried waffle weave & liked how they felt but couldn’t get behind how little drying power they had

The lack of decorative bands was a definite selling point as well (it’s that, in particular, that pushed me towards Towels by Gus over the other options working from the same mill)

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I gave up looking completely, I just threw the towel in.

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Agreed on the waffle knit being disappointing in the drying ability. I’ll have to check out the ones mentioned here. Been wanting a better towel

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Posted (edited)

You pampered lunatics!..

...a consideration i've never made, whatever next? tea-towels.. dish cloths?

I don't even know where the towels live in our house.. we have a magic towel fairy who replaces them on the rail in the bathroom.. if for any reason there are no towels there, i just dry myself on my t-shirt :blush2:

Edited by Double 0 Soul

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Drying off with a fine towel is like a hug from one's guardian angel.

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On 5/17/2022 at 8:43 AM, CSL said:

Drying off with a fine towel is like a hug from one's guardian angel.

Whereas using a crap towel is like an unwelcome hug from an ‘uncle’

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3 hours ago, Maynard Friedman said:

Whereas using a crap towel is like an unwelcome hug from an ‘uncle’

An uncle who is a little sweaty all the time for no reason. 

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What are everyone's thoughts on sustainability in denim acquisition (and other nice things)? In an effort to consume less and be a bit more environmentally conscious (and to be budget friendly), I have been mostly purchasing 2nd-hand items these past few years, and I generally don't have a problem. But I just bought some very lightly-worn Sugar Cane Okinawas online... and damn they were absolutely disgusting. Covered in dog hair, smelled like incense, and had what I hope is just a dirt stain. After a hot wash or 2, I think I may just buy new jeans from now on.

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Posted (edited)
56 minutes ago, Coolguyzack said:

What are everyone's thoughts on sustainability in denim acquisition (and other nice things)? In an effort to consume less and be a bit more environmentally conscious (and to be budget friendly), I have been mostly purchasing 2nd-hand items these past few years, and I generally don't have a problem. But I just bought some very lightly-worn Sugar Cane Okinawas online... and damn they were absolutely disgusting. Covered in dog hair, smelled like incense, and had what I hope is just a dirt stain. After a hot wash or 2, I think I may just buy new jeans from now on.

Yea, I mean, I get the rationale, but I won't do it for this reason - unless something is sold as basically unworn, then maybe. Almost everyone here really could just buy less jeans if saving $/resources was the true goal - thrifting is cool to build a collection cheaply but no one really needs a collection in the first place when like...even 2 pairs of jeans is basically overkill at any given moment. 

Reducing an individual carbon footprint is good and all but the most sustainable thing possible is to do whatever you can to help change public policy in a way that incentivizes renewables and other broad public measures. The garment industry has a lot to answer for but most of the stuff here, getting hundreds of wears etc, hardly registers compared to the real offenders. I don't mean to sound flip but you've got to choose your battles and for me wearing someone else dirty stuff isn't one of them. Godspeed to those who take that one up though, I wish them nothing but the best. 

You might look into Ogilvy's PR campaign about the concept of the individual carbon footprint if you want something truly cynical to read but also to maybe convince you that stank old jeans might not be the best place to skimp. 

Now, some other stuff - tools, gear, etc - totally will buy used. Esp if I can find it locally and I'm not wearing it or sleeping on it, then cool. Even furniture if it's metal/wood - or can be reupholstered etc.  

Edited by AlientoyWorkmachine

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14 minutes ago, AlientoyWorkmachine said:

Yea, I mean, I get the rationale, but I won't do it for this reason - unless something is sold as basically unworn, then maybe. Almost everyone here really could just buy less jeans if saving $/resources was the true goal - thrifting is cool to build a collection cheaply but no one really needs a collection in the first place when like...even 2 pairs of jeans is basically overkill at any given moment. 

Reducing an individual carbon footprint is good and all but the most sustainable thing possible is to do whatever you can to help change public policy in a way that incentivizes renewables and other broad public measures. The garment industry has a lot to answer for but most of the stuff here, getting hundreds of wears etc, hardly registers compared to the real offenders. I don't mean to sound flip but you've got to choose your battles and for me wearing someone else dirty stuff isn't one of them. Godspeed to those who take that one up though, I wish them nothing but the best. 

You might look into Ogilvy's PR campaign about the concept of the individual carbon footprint if you want something truly cynical to read but also to maybe convince you that stank old jeans might not be the best place to skimp. 

Now, some other stuff - tools, gear, etc - totally will buy used. Esp if I can find it locally and I'm not wearing it or sleeping on it, then cool. Even furniture if it's metal/wood - or can be reupholstered etc.  

Haha! I should clarify, I would not have purchased them had I known they would arrive so gross. But true, I agree that so much of the guilt gets unfairly passed on to the consumer as opposed to the real culprits, the fast fashion mega conglomerates and hesitant lawmakers. 

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Posted (edited)
2 hours ago, Coolguyzack said:

What are everyone's thoughts on sustainability in denim acquisition (and other nice things)? In an effort to consume less and be a bit more environmentally conscious (and to be budget friendly), I have been mostly purchasing 2nd-hand items these past few years, and I generally don't have a problem. But I just bought some very lightly-worn Sugar Cane Okinawas online... and damn they were absolutely disgusting. Covered in dog hair, smelled like incense, and had what I hope is just a dirt stain. After a hot wash or 2, I think I may just buy new jeans from now on.

Haha, classic... maybe there's something about SC aficionados being too busy leading their authentic lives to worry about the niceties, but the most egregious jeans I ever received through the post were a pair of SC47s that appeared to have been worn by a bikie with overactive sebaceous glands and a predilection for enjoying his own rich musk. I think I paid $20 for them, and when I was preparing them for a much-needed wash a crisp $10 note fell out of a front pocket. I like to imagine him thinking "fuck's sake, that's rancid, even for me" as he went to seal the parcel and copped a whiff, then jamming a tenner in the pocket as compensation.

Much further down the track and they've become a favourite pair, though the waistband is considerably more pinched than other 47s I have in the same size. I've had a good run with that model – maybe half a dozen pairs over the years, two brand new but under three figures (eBay, I think), this stinky pair for ten bucks and then two more at a local thrift store for a further $10 each... all up, they come in at less than the retail for one new pair, which is hardly exorbitant anyway...

Edited by mondo

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@Coolguyzack Interesting question for sure. I'n my opinion our hobby here, which is buying a high quality product and wearing it and repairing for a long time, is already sustainable in itself. Of course you could go the extra mile by buying second hand but I believe what we're doing is good enough. Personally jeans is something I want to have been 100% mine from day one unless it's just some beater Levi's. I want to add that maybe 50% of my wardrobe is second hand, but none of those garments are jeans. Though I do think I could think twice more often when buying a new pair of jeans or garment, do I really need this or do I simply want it?
Still, compared to people who buy 20$ fast fashion jeans that won't last a year or get thrown away for a new pair I think we're all good.

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WTF I caught myself today in beige.

beige wallabees , tusk cardigan, beige baracuta g9, cathartt Brown Bucket hat.

is it fashion , is it style, is it middle aged man?

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1 hour ago, smoothsailor said:

WTF I caught myself today in beige.

beige wallabees , tusk cardigan, beige baracuta g9, cathartt Brown Bucket hat.

is it fashion , is it style, is it middle aged man?

depends. what time did you eat dinner and how soon after did you get a little indigestion but didnt even really notice because it happens everyday now?  

 

 

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If you’re wearing all beige and a tusk cardigan, it sounds like you’re on safari 

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As long as you've never had the thought, "This would go great with some white New Balances" then it's just fashion. I think you're good, bro. For now...

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On 5/30/2022 at 7:52 AM, NilsLW said:

@Coolguyzack Interesting question for sure. I'n my opinion our hobby here, which is buying a high quality product and wearing it and repairing for a long time, is already sustainable in itself. Of course you could go the extra mile by buying second hand but I believe what we're doing is good enough. Personally jeans is something I want to have been 100% mine from day one unless it's just some beater Levi's. I want to add that maybe 50% of my wardrobe is second hand, but none of those garments are jeans. Though I do think I could think twice more often when buying a new pair of jeans or garment, do I really need this or do I simply want it?
Still, compared to people who buy 20$ fast fashion jeans that won't last a year or get thrown away for a new pair I think we're all good.

If this were the case I'd agree - but (and I include myself in this)...a lot of us have more pairs then will possibly get worn down to the shreds they deserve, and our holding stocks are often optimistic in the face of an aging body. I have one pair waiting in the wings and 5 in rotation and that's basically 3-4 too many to do this thing justice IMO. I think it's different for like, aficionados/heritage collectors because wearing them isn't necessarily the point - but for me, a guy who collects something entirely different and just likes to wear jeans, I know I definitely could be more sustainable. It's tough because I do love what I see being made. 

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I think I’m safe, on my urban safari, Enroute to get big white sneakers, but be home early. In time for dinner and close to the loo

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2 hours ago, smoothsailor said:

I think I’m safe, on my urban safari, Enroute to get big white sneakers, but be home early. In time for dinner and close to the loo

in my head, this post appeared in the same monotone as radiohead's Fitter, Happier

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15 hours ago, smoothsailor said:

WTF I caught myself today in beige.

beige wallabees , tusk cardigan, beige baracuta g9, cathartt Brown Bucket hat.

is it fashion , is it style, is it middle aged man?

 Comes to us all...

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22 hours ago, smoothsailor said:

WTF I caught myself today in beige.

beige wallabees , tusk cardigan, beige baracuta g9, cathartt Brown Bucket hat.

is it fashion , is it style, is it middle aged man?

We’re you pulling one of these behind you too?

 

F5CF1863-85A0-4605-A684-5141065D08C1.jpeg

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Good god I just clocked a Louis Vuitton shopping trolly on google.

To be honest they make sense when you're carrying 2 x 4 pinters of milk and a case of beer back home in a couple of plastic bags cutting into your fingers

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I think the boom was fueled by Tesco trolleys magically applying brakes as they leave the carpark..

..pre the recently cool shopping trolley a couple of enterprising students would rob one from Tesco and push it down to Wilko in the city center.. fill it up, Jenga-style with pillows, ironing boards, cups, plates, patio/balcony furniture.. and other educational necessities, one would push it back while t'other would offer support to their cheap homeware tower on wheels.. leave the trolley outside their student digs so others can do the Wilko-run.

Skip fwd to the end of their education and these students have to vacate their flats before the next crop of freshers arrive, they have to leave it in the same state they found it or forfait their bond which means getting rid of all the Wilko crap they've amassed, most of this crap doesn't fit down the communal waste shoot in the flats and the vast majority of these kids don't have cars so they can't dispose of their shit at the out-of-town tip so in the days preceding vacation they start pilling it up around the small waste bin in the street, strategically possitioned ironing boards with duvet foundations (some'll be studying engineering) till it looks like NY in the 70's :D

The council slap notices everywhere saying fly-tipping carries a £500 fine.. yeah right, try enforcing that!

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46 minutes ago, bod said:

Good god I just clocked a Louis Vuitton shopping trolly on google.

To be honest they make sense when you're carrying 2 x 4 pinters of milk and a case of beer back home in a couple of plastic bags cutting into your fingers

You could accessorise with one of them clear plastic rain bonnets you tie under your chin which keep your hair dry..

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I tow mine, trailer style, on the back of my mobility scooter. The inbuilt front basket doesn’t have nearly enough capacity.

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11 hours ago, bod said:

We’re you pulling one of these behind you too?

 

F5CF1863-85A0-4605-A684-5141065D08C1.jpeg

You start giving me good ideas?

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