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Denim Blunders, Reflections and General Nonsense.

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^ I’m confused now. I thought we just suggested that painting prior to stitching was the consistent/standard method employed in those wartime days! :huh:

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Me too now! I thought there was a post on the previous page that showed the paint atop the stitching, unless that was a picture of an LVC and not original pair. 

I might go back to drinking cheap beer. 

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I should probably stop drinking it...

To avoid further confusion, I think it now seems that during WW2, the painted arcs were applied (by a yet to be confirmed method) before the pockets were attached. On modern (LVC) repros, we think the arcs are applied (by some form of printing process) after the pockets are attached.

Of course, I reserve the right to be totally wrong! :biggrin:

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the quickest way for mass production would be a large screen with a dozen or so arcs on it,  and then cutting them out after.

that last pic is great, maybe that for the tcb's. looks kinda like cat lips :3

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Posted (edited)

Not dazed, but confused as well.  I think the original query was @Flash asking how he should go about painting arcs on his jawns ?!?! Then, there was a post of a red painted ww2 arcs, w/c had a paint-over-stitch arc :biggrin:

Not savvy on ww2 or pre-war jeans production ... but, I imagine, a post-production painted arcs wouldn’t be feasible. It’s too much hassle & possibly high percentage of “quality” issues [rejects].  I’m thinking, painting part would’ve been done as, prep, pre-production line.  It won’t be on a conveyor, but rather a prep table with stacks of cut pocket part, bundled up by batches [cut#s] to avoid shading ... meaning, assembling parts from different rolls.

This way, a worker doesn’t do anything thing else but stamping arcs all day long.  It improves accuracy & speed.

 

Edited by BrownMetallic

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Here are the arcs on my Valencia St ‘44s. If you look closely, the second photo shows that they continue underneath the pocket fold so are likely to have been printed/painted/whatever(!) before the pocket was sewn on.

BA83F6EE-090F-45C4-A79E-B91A7EDA98A7.jpeg

EBD01E1B-4CFC-465D-A347-AE955D3181CF.jpeg

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For those who have never bought from them, Okayama Denim is fast. 

I placed my order on Thursday at about 11pm and it was at my door in Akron, Ohio today, Monday, at noon. 

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That’s because they’re not using EMS right now.

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Their DHL shipping option is always crazy fast.
My PBJ chambray shipped from Japan to Austin, TX in 3 days.

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Posted (edited)

Delete 

Edited by mlwdp

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Consider my jaw slack ...

D2923251-DB5D-4936-B66C-CF4F51BA2F0E.jpeg

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Well that's another mystery solved , thanks Duke ...... and yer man @Double 0 Soul knew it all along :wink:

 

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1 minute ago, Flash said:

Well that's another mystery solved , thanks Duke ...... and yer man @Double 0 Soul knew it all along :wink:

 

Lucky guess on Neal’s part I’d say :ph34r2:

Screen printing wasn’t really used commercially until 20/30s, so it’s not a ‘cheap’ process and I never thought it would be quicker or cheaper than a machinist running a couple of arcs ... but I get better educated every day.  

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The flasher

C33E344E-EFCC-4D0F-9614-3246341D24DD.jpeg

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What’s the book Duke?

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18 minutes ago, Maynard Friedman said:

What’s the book Duke?

 

DEA89D5C-B64C-4CC6-B14B-B20111BCBB9B.jpeg

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1 hour ago, Duke Mantee said:

Consider my jaw slack ...

D2923251-DB5D-4936-B66C-CF4F51BA2F0E.jpeg

Knew l'd seen it somewhere. Well done Duke!

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I just bought this book in electronic format so I can post pics more easily

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3 hours ago, Duke Mantee said:

Lucky guess on Neal’s part I’d say :ph34r2:

Screen printing wasn’t really used commercially until 20/30s, so it’s not a ‘cheap’ process and I never thought it would be quicker or cheaper than a machinist running a couple of arcs ... but I get better educated every day.  

Yeah, i don't think there would be much in it time-wise... but rather than speed or cost cutting being the driving force i think Levi's had to find an alternative to thread because war restrictions wouldn't let them waste it on 'fashion' printed on arcs allowed them to keep their branding.

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3 hours ago, Double 0 Soul said:

Yeah, i don't think there would be much in it time-wise... but rather than speed or cost cutting being the driving force i think Levi's had to find an alternative to thread because war restrictions wouldn't let them waste it on 'fashion' printed on arcs allowed them to keep their branding.

You’re right - Levi’s just found a workaround to the wording of the restrictions 

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Posted (edited)

These are out of the ebook so hopefully a little bit clearer - especially the flasher text ... “the pigments used are harmless and temporary, and will wash out without injury to the fabric in any way”

ADEA8F5E-C0A9-4E10-A2B2-162798B71738.jpeg

B756B75E-8AA1-4CB7-8B36-24574D84596A.jpeg

Edited by Duke Mantee

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@Duke Mantee would you have a link for me to buy this book please ? I’ve searched but didn’t found it unfortunatly..

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33 minutes ago, Collin said:

@Duke Mantee would you have a link for me to buy this book please ? I’ve searched but didn’t found it unfortunatly..

Aota Mitsuhiro is the link for the ebook

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The blurb of the book reminds me that I’ve reflected once or twice, ‘hold on, Levi Strauss got all the glory, but Jacob Davis created the riveted overalls’. I suppose it just comes down to the fact that Levi Strauss bankrolled and produced them, and it happens all the time in business. Just sucks that his name is not properly associated with jeans to the non-denim nerd masses.  

 

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1 minute ago, unders said:

The blurb of the book reminds me that I’ve reflected once or twice, ‘hold on, Levi Strauss got all the glory, but Jacob Davis created the riveted overalls’. I suppose it just comes down to the fact that Levi Strauss bankrolled and produced them, and it happens all the time in business. Just sucks that his name is not properly associated with jeans to the non-denim nerd masses.  

 

We are captivated by the romance of denim and rarely think about the business end - the real life aspects. Arguably that’s a much more interesting history ...

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While on the topic of books: has anyone read Jeans of the Old West: A History by Michael Allen Harris? I've wanted to purchase it for some time, but I'd like to know if its mostly pictures or an actual engaging history.

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Posted (edited)
41 minutes ago, Duke Mantee said:

We are captivated by the romance of denim and rarely think about the business end - the real life aspects. Arguably that’s a much more interesting history ...

I’d like to think the Strauss family shared at least some of the wealth with the Davis’. 

Just found this: https://www.levistrauss.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/01/Jacob-Davis-His-Life-and-Contributions1.pdf

I wouldn’t be surprised if he sold his sold his share, worked for the boss until the end, and that was that. 
 

Edit: found this that gives a new take on the original riveting. I haven’t read anything that goes into this level of detail before. Turns out the riveting was a combination of winding up his client and trying to keep the drunk away by fixing up his overalls good n proper. 

 https://online.ucpress.edu/scq/article/30/3/208/84290/Levi-Strauss-Western-Pioneer-Manufacturer

Edited by unders

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