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What size/colour?

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I was pretty disappointed w my acg cargos. They're likely going back

For $200 I was actually really quite impressed. Lived in them at Daytona this weekend, and they looked pretty good imo:

 

IMG_6962.JPG

 

Dunno why that's showing up rotated...

Edited by drgitlin

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What size/colour?

 

L/Black

 

I just can't get behind these things. The color is off and I don't really care for any of the details such as the cinch cargo pockets, ankle zips, nor the waist button. Also hate the fact that these are not substantial whatsoever. As Rashad (RIP) would say:

 

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THREE-LAYER FABRICS 101

The Waterproof-Breathable Jacket, Explained by 5 Experts

 

The very idea of a waterproof and breathable shell poses an obvious challenge: How can it be breathable, which implies permeability, yet waterproof, which would seem to mean impermeable? The outdoor industry has almost universally settled on an answer in the form of a three-layer fabric (there are also two- and 2.5-layer shells, but three is generally considered the most durable and best suited for winter), made up of an exterior textile, a technical membrane and a backer textile, all of which are bonded together. The basic idea is that this fabric — specifically its membrane — prevents outside water from seeping in while also allowing sweat and heat to escape, creating a piece of outerwear that can be used for active outdoor pursuits in the cold weather.

The outer textile of most three-layer shells is made of a rugged nylon or polyester that’s coated with Durable Water Repellent (DWR). The inner membrane is a microporous fabric, typically made of ePTFE or Polyurethane that acts as the shell’s primary waterproof and breathable layer. It’s the secret sauce. The backer textile is a thin layer, usually gauze, that’s laminated to back of the membrane, which eliminates the need for a liner.

While the waterproof and breathable technologies are all generally related in the way they function, several brands have proprietary technologies, among them Gore-Tex, NeoShell, eVent, Schoeller and Dermizax NX. Discerning one technology from another can be difficult, in part because the technology is kept under lock and key, but also because the technology requires an understanding of terms like “phase change†and how things work on a molecular level. So we asked the chemists, engineers and designers who worked hands-on with each. Note that there are plenty of other proprietary technologies like Marmot MemBrain and Helly Hansen’s Flow membrane, but we chose technologies that are available across a variety of brands. Below are our experts’ responses, along with three winter shells that incorporate the associated technology.


Gore-Tex Pro
Expert: Mark McKinnie, Gore’s Product Specialist in the UK
Of Gore’s technologies, which include Gore-Tex Active and Gore-Tex Paclite (among others), their Gore-Tex Pro shells are the toughest...
AjTwoCDl.jpg


Dermizax NX
Expert: Chris Pew, TREW’s Founder & Director of Product
“Dermizax NX simply sets a new high-water mark for breathability with waterproof shells,†says Chris Pew, founder and the director of product at TREW...
3nO3Jgfl.jpg


Polartec NeoShell
Expert: Michael Cattanach, Polartec’s Global Product Director
According to Michael Cattanach, Polartec‘s global product director, who is also responsible for product innovation at the company, the main goal with Polartec Neoshell is breathability...
9EKtUWwl.jpg


eVent Fabric
Expert: Chad Kelly, Director of Sales and Product Line for eVent fabrics
Chad Kelly, the brand’s director of sales and product line who has been with eVent fabrics since its inception in 1999, says DValpine technology separates them from competitors...
vGAD7u2l.jpg


Schoeller c_change
Expert: Stephen Kerns, President of Schoeller Textiles USA
Schoeller Textiles sought to create a high-performance laminate that is waterproof while going further in breathability and eco-friendliness, says Stephen Kerns, the company’s president. The result was c_change...
Rh3McXwl.jpg

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For $200 I was actually really quite impressed. Lived in them at Daytona this weekend, and they looked pretty good imo:

 

IMG_6962.JPG

 

Dunno why that's showing up rotated...

 

those look like the veilance anode not the acg cargo

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I was pretty disappointed w my acg cargos. They're likely going back

 

Guess it is a hit and miss with these pants. I have both the navy and black and went TTS. I am loving the fit and although the pants are not 'waterproof', but I have to say the material becomes softer after a couple of soaks and settles down better. When I first wore it, felt like I was wearing cardboard.

Edited by hurhur

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Tumblrs and 'grams are cool but I'd also like a list of glossy print magazines that feature or, preferably, focus on urban techwear. Any suggestions?

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ho_yrIC2U4s.jpg

TECHUNTER.RU

(there is one soldout issue, but they are working on second, probably russian only, the scene is biggest there)

Edited by danii

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those look like the veilance anode not the acg cargo

Oh LOL in that photo you might be right. I may have to negative rep myself... 

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Oh LOL in that photo you might be right. I may have to negative rep myself... 

 

 

no need, the pant is awesome [/wearing it right now]

Edited by frankie_four

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Tumblrs and 'grams are cool but I'd also like a list of glossy print magazines that feature or, preferably, focus on urban techwear. Any suggestions?

-----

A bit off posting perhaps but my philosophy is what works in tough conditions could work in urban conditions (goretex pants in the city is a bit much) but the other way around is more of a challenge.

I like this Russian website about gear: http://www.gearshout.net

Edited by Sjefur

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A bit off posting perhaps but my philosophy is what works in tough conditions could work in urban conditions (goretex pants in the city is a bit much) but the other way around is more of a challenge.

I like this Russian website about gear: http://www.gearshout.net

Yep. Outdoors techwear magazines, Outside for example, never mention brands like Acronym And those magazines are primarily writing about tech not aesthetics which is why I'm searching for one with an urban focus.

I'm a bit surprised that both suggestions so far have been Russian. I expected perhaps an obscure Japanese one since they seem to have fashion magazines for every style...

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I'm a bit surprised that both suggestions so far have been Russian. 

 

I'm not: russia excels in horrific weather and pervasive dystopian aesthetics. It's like the og techwear country. 

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I'm not: russia excels in horrific weather and pervasive dystopian aesthetics. It's like the og techwear country.

Does it? I would have guessed that because the conditions in Russia are so tough that they focus on their heritage technical wear. I can't think of any futuristic fashions designers (or any famous fashion designers really) to come out of Russia

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I'm all for aesthetics combined with functionality and quality. This is primarily why I love Acronym so much. Most outdoor gear have made huge shifts to aesthetics but shit loads of aesthetic stuff is still shitty in terms of quality or functionality. Those are a dime a dozen.

In the old days we just used to wear army gear to be able to sleep, eat and dance on the floors of our squatted factories without having to worry about our clothes. And we thought it to be very aesthetic ;)

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I'm not: russia excels in horrific weather and pervasive dystopian aesthetics. It's like the og techwear country. 

 

Adidas tracksuits?

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Anybody got any recommendations on cool lookin gloves? I recently got the ACG Trench and ACG Cargos, so the more technical urban look is what I'm going for. Also random question, has anyone tried skiing with the ACG cargos or at least walking through a snowy day with them? I'm in how they hold up and keeping you dry or not.

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how they hold up and keeping you dry or not.

general consensus of the last 10 pages here suggests they do not do a good job of the above

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^ ok word - got some liners to go underneath em' as back up to stay dry. Tryin' to pull off a certain look on this day/ski trip I'm taking. Trying to do it with getting the least amount of 'actual' ski apparel as possible because I don't want to be storing snow gear that I wear all of one year.

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Does it? I would have guessed that because the conditions in Russia are so tough that they focus on their heritage technical wear. I can't think of any futuristic fashions designers (or any famous fashion designers really) to come out of Russia

 

i wasn't thinking of fashion but more about postwar modernism in architecture and industrial design. i can't think of a more natural environment for an acronym j1a than the concrete husk of a decommissioned chemical weapons factory in a snowblown town that has a number attached to it's name.

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Anybody got any recommendations on cool lookin gloves? I recently got the ACG Trench and ACG Cargos, so the more technical urban look is what I'm going for. Also random question, has anyone tried skiing with the ACG cargos or at least walking through a snowy day with them? I'm in how they hold up and keeping you dry or not.

They're not insulated or waterproof so skiiing in them sounds like a really bad idea.

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@Markmont

I'm really happy with

http://www.theheatcompany.com/en/gloves/heat3-smart-full-leather I chose (super) functionality above aesthetics: gloves and mitten in one, technical and natural combined, (warm patches) pouch, operating your smart device and having a secure line in situations where dropping your gloves is losing your rule of thumb. And well aesthetics; Mad Max here I come?

---

@Inkinsurgent & @SuE

http://gosharubchinskiy.com more retro than futuristic but one thing I've learned with travelling is that we know so little of what is hot and what is not in other cultures and certainly know next to nothing about their niches. What I see the local kids high in the Himalaya do is combining traditional yak wool jacket with tech gear and hoody and it looks bad ass. Their hairstyles are unmatched.

From the old box, Urban Tek no, where? Tech wear avant la lettre 😉

Bs0KkaQ.jpgp7RW6lf.jpgAkepeRI.jpgVdLZdRK.jpg

Edited by Sjefur

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Re: Russia = Techwear Mecca(?)
Not really techwear related, but (to me) an interesting glimpse of the mentality or mindset of that hard/military aesthetic that I perceive as Russian. I guess if you're to relate it to aesthetics and cinema, it's more Mad Max than Blade Runner: 

 

A fascinating watch for me as I have little to no knowledge of Russian politics or it's recent history/turmoil. I guess I find it funny to envision the dystopian future having "designed" or "tech" fabrics with jacket slings, escape zippers, and Gore-Tex. But watching these hardened men, honestly they're just wearing old leftover military surplus gear and leather jackets/vests which function more as armor/protection. I guess I find it a little presumptuous to say that there's a future where all fabric and fits are aligned with Acronym when honestly their work will only and always serve a particular subset of the populace. It's cute to imagine as a product/fashion/clothing designer scenarios where you've created a futuristic and utilitarian fashion that's gear... but in reality for most people it really doesn't matter. I'm saying this as a designer who relates to this design dilemma. 

Edited by dystaind

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They're not insulated or waterproof so skiiing in them sounds like a really bad idea.

Yea maybe so lol BUT beneath them I will have 2 seperate insulated layers. 1 is a thick skin layer (Nike pro Hyperwarm Max tights) and another is LL Beans PrimaLoft insulted liners. Also I'm not tall at 5 7 so the trench will cover most of my leg length.

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Yea maybe so lol BUT beneath them I will have 2 seperate insulated layers. 1 is a thick skin layer (Nike pro Hyperwarm Max tights) and another is LL Beans PrimaLoft insulted liners. Also I'm not tall at 5 7 so the trench will cover most of my leg length.

 

Once they get wet though (which they will because the pants aren't waterproof), they won't insulate for jack.  In fact, probably the opposite: it'll draw your body heat.  Heat always moves from hotter to the cooler, so if your liners are wet/cold, your body heat will leave you.

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So you don't think that even with this layer underneath them:

 

http://www.llbean.com/llb/shop/78255?feat=Primaloft-SR0&page=primaloft-insulated-long-underwear-bottom&attrValue_0=Gunmetal%20Gray&productId=1292210

 

and literally only about 8 inches of the pants showing (since the ski boots are high and the jacket is long) that I can stay dry?

 

mm_test_2016.jpg

Edited by Markmont

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