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Sugar Cane Denim

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Interesting. Well, just to give you guys an update, I have a size 30 on the way. Since it takes a few weeks to order a 29 and they will be non-refundable, I decided to try a 30. If they don't fit, I can order a 29, and there will be no harm done.

Wild: So according to what you're saying, the 30 is going to be the right move?

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i was under the impression from reading other threads that the jeans won't shrink to the actual tag size giver or take a half inch. do the sugarcanes shrink below tag size (i.e. a size 29 jean would shrink to a 28 after a cold soak?)

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what up peoples

so heres the deal

the jeans i normally wear are sevens (I wear a 32 and they fit great)

i also have da'mage (I bought a 33 and it fits great)

These jeans are kinda low-rise though, so i wasnt sure if thats really my waist size.

knowing that canes, like levis, are high rise on the waist, i thought i should order a size bigger.

i ordered the 34.

havent gotten it yet...

did i make the right choice?

ps. ordered raw btw, dont intend for them to touch water for a very long time.....

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I recommend to anybody buying the jeans raw to cold soak them first, before wearing them. This shrinks the jeans so that your wear marks will remain in the same spot. Not to mention the jeans will be very baggy until you choose to wash them. Then they will fit rather snug. I know that i like my jeans to fit the same at all times. The cold soak does not affect the wearing process much. Most of the sugarcanes you will see on online galleries have either been bought in the one wash state or cold soaked prior to wearing them.

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I recommend to anybody buying the jeans raw to cold soak them first, before wearing them. This shrinks the jeans so that your wear marks will remain in the same spot. Not to mention the jeans will be very baggy until you choose to wash them. Then they will fit rather snug. I know that i like my jeans to fit the same at all times. The cold soak does not affect the wearing process much. Most of the sugarcanes you will see on online galleries have either been bought in the one wash state or cold soaked prior to wearing them.

--- Original message by rnrswitch on Oct 24, 2005 04:12 PM

can i get a second on this recommendation?

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I second that! Those jeans are rockin!

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Guest Guy H

Not keen. Don't like the lack of a back pocket and I don't like the back buckle.

I spent a lot of of money on booze, birds and

fast cars. The rest I just squandered - George Best

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i think it can do without the back buckle.

kinda on the fence about only 1 back pocket, but i only use one anyway. looks okay

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Quote:
Quote:

I recommend to anybody buying the jeans raw to cold soak them first, before wearing them. This shrinks the jeans so that your wear marks will remain in the same spot. Not to mention the jeans will be very baggy until you choose to wash them. Then they will fit rather snug. I know that i like my jeans to fit the same at all times. The cold soak does not affect the wearing process much. Most of the sugarcanes you will see on online galleries have either been bought in the one wash state or cold soaked prior to wearing them.

--- Original message by rnrswitch on Oct 24, 2005 04:12 PM

can i get a second on this recommendation?

--- Original message by CL Smooth on Oct 24, 2005 05:40 PM

second.. He's right. You shouldn't break in non-sanforized jeans from the raw state unless you plan to never wash them, *ever.* For the cold soak, soak them for a couple hours, not a couple minutes. They'll shrink plenty. They'll be fuzzy, too, after they're dry and worn a little but you can't avoid this with vintage-style denim. The fuzz will go away when they've been broken in.

Griffin, I think buying the 30 was the right move, if for no other reason than you can return them for a 29 if you don't like them. From my experience with Sugarcane and LVC 1947, you'll need a 30. My waist is about 30.5" and when I tried on Sugarcanes 1947s, they were already pretty tight around the upper hips/waist at size 29 (unwashed).

Definitely cold soak them.

Edited by wild_whiskey on Oct 25, 2005 at 01:02 PM

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i think youre right about the sc 47 1-wash being heat dried. i have several lvc raw 34x34 and after a cold to warm soak and a hang dry, they all fit perfect. however, i just got the sc 1947 1-wash in a 34x34 and they are significantly tighter in the waist than my raw lvc after washing my way. i think they rapidly shrink the shit out of the sc 1-wash and hard wash and definitely use heat. how would they get them so soft and fuzzy otherwise?? anyway, they recommended that i get a 36 waist in the 1-wash but i insisted to have them send me a raw pair of 34's so i can control the shrinkage. we'll see...

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I just got a pair of Hawaii, not the $400 pair, but a different pair. They are very nice, but the inside fibers on the jeans are killing my skin, its mad itchy. Will that go away with wear? Also, these things bleed all over the place, my hands were completely blue from touching them, and my white shirt I was wearing turned blue all over. Will the cold soak remove this? Im heistate to soak them because I like the way they fit right now.

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The itchy fibres do get a little easier to live with after wearing them for a while. You could also pull out the worst of the woody fibres. A cold soak won't prevent the jeans from crocking. It will lessen it a bit as some indigo will be removed in the wash, but the Hawaii's will still turn everything blue for a long time afterwards.

Hawaii's are for masochistic denim nerds only.icon_smile_wink.gif

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i'm curious, are the sugar cane 1966 really made in the US as the tag says . . . and where would they be made . . . also assuming the denim is japanese? if anyone has any info/thoughts I'd love to get more info on them . . . thanks.

img10451598333.jpeg

img10451598328.jpeg

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I wouldn't get the Made in USA version if I were you though they are really made in the US. I think those models were made because a lot of japanese people are infatuated with American made stuff.

I still think these Samurai's are the craziest jeans ever:

http://www.rakuten.co.jp/d-stock/540681/620212/

Saw them on d-stock a while ago and I was like wow...looks insane and must be a bitch to wear.

Edited by super on Nov 6, 2005 at 02:17 AM

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god I never knew so much went into a good pair of jeans until I started researching it! I'm designing a collection of mens jeans for my final graduate collection argh! I'm learning loads from what I'm reading is there definite denim labels or detailing I should look at when trying to make the perfect pair of jeans!?icon_smile_big.gif

Hi I'm designing a denim range for my final collection at University and I'm reading with interest all the comments on denim and jeans, as I'm only now realising how much goes into a perfect pair of jeans can anyone tell me what details you would always look for when purchasing jeans and whats important to you?

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Quote:

i'm curious, are the sugar cane 1966 really made in the US as the tag says . . . and where would they be made . . . also assuming the denim is japanese? if anyone has any info/thoughts I'd love to get more info on them . . . thanks.

img10451598333.jpeg

img10451598328.jpeg

--- Original message by the black arm on Nov 5, 2005 11:02 PM

Yes, they are really made in the US, but from Japanese denim.

See http://www.sugarcane.jp/standard.html for details and some photos of the US shopsite.

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i'm curious, are the sugar cane 1966 really made in the US as the tag says . . . and where would they be made . . . also assuming the denim is japanese? if anyone has any info/thoughts I'd love to get more info on them . . . thanks.

img10451598333.jpeg

img10451598328.jpeg

--- Original message by the black arm on Nov 5, 2005 11:02 PM

Yes, they are made in the US, but from Japanese denim:

http://www.sugarcane.jp/standard.html

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those samurai jeans are dope, saw them awhile back, but for $500? that's a lot, can't read japanese but I wonder why it's so expensive. The denim is thick and the pattern somewhat look like the hawaii's

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Wow, those Samurai jeans are amazing.

How do they achieve the striations in the denim?

Do they just weave warp threads that have been dipped a different number of times?

If it's that easy, I wish more companies would do it.

Prefiero morir de pie que vivir siempre arrodillado

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Only 250 pairs were made (each one is numbered) and they are pretty much unobtainable now, except maybe on the secondary market.

There are, however, other natural indigo jeans available (none as heavy as 17 oz/sq yard, though, as far as I'm aware). Some that come to mind are by Pure Blue Japan, Burgus, Studio D'Artisan.

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I really like canes and are looking to buy a pair. can anyone (ringring) summarize the difference between the standards, edo, hawaiis, and okinawas? thanks.

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Just curious as I really want to buy a pair, but after wash, what's the measurement of the leg opening after wash? I hope they are not as tapered as APC new standards. Thats the only reason I got rid of those. I like the opening of the old bootcut APC, similar to the Rescues, are they the same? Talking about the 1947 model by the way.

thanks

tons of stuff for sale now on ebay: corpus, hollywood ranch, levi's premium, vintage etc.

http://search.ebay.com/_W0QQsassZtriggerkid

Edited by poly800rock on Nov 14, 2005 at 08:07 PM

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I really like canes and are looking to buy a pair. can anyone (ringring) summarize the difference between the standards, edo, hawaiis, and okinawas? thanks.

--- Original message by red on Nov 9, 2005 07:31 PM

Hey Red,

You can basically divide Sugarcane jeans into 2 parts. Firstly the standard 501 styles, which are focus on being true historical reproductions.

Then there's the jeans that fall under their Satokibi section, where Sugarcane add extra dimensions to just being straight 501 repros. eg. Sweet Sorghum/cotton mix, natural indigo from different geographical cultivation's, patterned pocket bags, embroidered pockets etc.

Sugarcane Standard Jeans:

The standard series are high quality 501-style repros. Synthetic indigo dyed. 60% USA & 40% Zimbabwe cotton. Ringspun, rope dyed, shuttle loomed. From around 13.75oz-14.25oz. Construction is pretty much as you'd expect from a 501 repro, including the lovely rolled chainstitched hems done on Union Specials.

SC411945 - Left hand twill.

SC411947 - Right hand twill, slim 'cowboy' fit.

Sugarcane 'Made in USA' jeans. Here's an example of Sugarcane going to extraordinary lengths in it's reproductions - sewing them in the USA (denim is imported from Japan). Otherwise, they are very much like the Standards.

SC411955 - also available as a limited number of zip fly jeans using deadstock Scovill zippers. 14.25oz denim

SC411966 - button fly 14oz. Slim fit, more of a boxy waist than the 47's.

The Okinawa's,Hawaii's and Edo's have been made in a few variants. If you do a search on here you'll find they have been discussed quite a bit - and if you can pull up photos of each style, you'll see for yourself the different pocket bags, embroideries etc.

Most of the fittings are like 47's, slim-ish five pocket jeans. Although one of the Edo's (SC40501) is a cinchback and the SC40300 Okinawa is a Lee 'cowboy' style.

Most are available dry or one wash. Some are available in vintage-style washes.

The Satokibi series can be very roughly summarised as, natural indigo, sorghum/cotton mix jeans. Although the Okinawa's are available in several dye finishes like persimmon, mud, tea, as well as indigo. Mostly the construction is pretty standard 501 style sewing, although notably different are the Hawaii's SC40400's which feature hand felled seams (very laborious) and single lockstitch hems.

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Those $450 Samurais are sold-out in all sizes? anberiivurabu

Great explanation, ringring. Can you tell where is the cotton in dartisans from?

Quote: god I never knew so much went into a good pair of jeans until I started researching it! I'm designing a collection of mens jeans for my final graduate collection argh! I'm learning loads from what I'm reading is there definite denim labels or detailing I should look at when trying to make the perfect pair of jeans!?

It all depends on your price point and the style you're trying to accomplish. For a classic vintage style I guess you can copy old Levis or the brands we're discussing here. For a modern style who knows...

Quote: How do they achieve the striations in the denim?

I don't know but I think they combine different thicknesses.

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