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Denim Repair

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with a little professional help even the most horrifying blowout can be fixed

before with what looks like homemade reapirs

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after taken to japanese tailor

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Not sure how good an example this is but tear mender fabric cement can be useful but particularly when combined with stiching

waywt143he9-1.jpg

Picture005-1.jpg

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There's a lot of crotch repairs in this thread, but I haven't found any info on repairing hems. Is it possible? If so, how would I go about fixing them?? The hems on my sams have ripped apart, and I don't know how much longer they'll hold. Here's some pics:

CIMG6757.jpgCIMG6750.jpgCIMG6746.jpg

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This was just posted in another thread, it might be a solution:

sgf006suso.jpg

An extra piece of fabric, here with selvedge, is used to make the back of the hem stronger. Could just do someting like that.

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It's not extreme, but this is my favorite repair.

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I have to admit I never thought of patching it from the inside. The woman that did this had plan for the rest of the bag if it started to fail, but I never got to try it out.

i'm going to try this out, did she do this by hand or by machine?

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i'm going to try this out, did she do this by hand or by machine?

i would say w/ a machine unless she has ridiculously amazing sewing skills by hands.

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i'm going to try this out, did she do this by hand or by machine?

I don't know, but I will ask her the next time I'm in her shop.

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There's a lot of crotch repairs in this thread, but I haven't found any info on repairing hems. Is it possible? If so, how would I go about fixing them?? The hems on my sams have ripped apart, and I don't know how much longer they'll hold.

Hem repair:

ec40_3.jpg

I guess all you would have to do is take the chainstitch off and sew back and forth like crotch repair, then have it chainstiched again...

Here's some ass repair too:

8bab_3.jpg

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quick question about putting in a patch to stop a crotch blow out: does the patch have to be denim? i could use another material, but am afraid that it will be too weak to withstand the level of wear.

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quick question about putting in a patch to stop a crotch blow out: does the patch have to be denim? i could use another material, but am afraid that it will be too weak to withstand the level of wear.

use spider silk strands--strongest fibers known, natural or manmade

p.s. i like the double entendre in the title of this thread

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quick question about putting in a patch to stop a crotch blow out: does the patch have to be denim? i could use another material, but am afraid that it will be too weak to withstand the level of wear.

I'm sure a thick herringbone cloth would be strong enough to withstand wear and if you found a nice blue to compliment the jeans it could be as good or better than patching with denim.

p.s. i like the double entendre in the title of this thread

I just got this

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The stitching method mentioned in the 45rpm method is a lock stitch so called because you stitch two intertwining thread both over and under the cloth like so

320px-Lockstitch.png

This seems to be the stitch used in most of the professional repairs seen so far.

I was under the impression this could only be carried out by a sowing machine but the same stitch can be performed with a 'sewing awl' not certain of how this works exactly but i believe they come with instruction.

awl.jpg

This seems most commonly used for repairs of more robust materials like leather canvas etc

Does anyone with experience know if such a method could be applied to denim or wether major repairs should only be carried out with a machine?

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I use that awl for sewing my leather goods. It's pretty easy to use, but using a regular needle and the lockstitch method may be a little hard. It's hard to explain, but the end of the thread (not attached to the spool) goes through one side of the fabric and stays there. With the needle/spool side, you make a series of loops that go through to the non-spool side. Then you thread the extra string through the loop, pull the loop out so that the string is still in the middle, and repeat the process.

It's a lot more confusing than it sounds. My awl came with instructions on how to use it, and I'd scan it if I had it with me. In short, if you're hand sewing, I'd just go with the normal method, and then just "retrace" the stitching by filling in the gaps between the stitches. I'm sorry if none of this makes sense, it'd be a lot easier if I had pictures. :(

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i think it would be insane if you tried the 45rpm style invisible repair by hand, if not downright impossible. i'd say either a) use a machine (which uses lockstitches), or B) take it to a tailor. the only handstitched repairs i've seen that look decent are deliberately rustic, like knee patches etc.

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I've ripped the knee of my 55 501s after using them like 5 days, any advice on how to repair them as invisible as possible?

50155akw9.th.jpg

50155bok8.th.jpg

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Olle either take them to a tailor or a clothing repair place or read the 45rpm method on the previous page but do the stitching by hand.

Looks like a pretty small hole perhaps this doesnt require patching. Repairs dont always need to be invisible.

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IMG_0252.jpg

IMG_0256.jpg

used white thread on one side and blue tread after realizing i should have used blue in the first place. oh well, i love home repairs. i might try red contrast stitching next time depending on location of repair.

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Can any of the Philly people suggest a place for getting some crotch repair done in the city?

I'm on the fence about whether to do it myself or take it somewhere.

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Guest DUM

don't know if anyone remembers the ass blowout in my Skulls but Gordon fixed them for free and they're holding up great.

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6tv07cy.jpg

Rear left pocket hole from wallet snap

6k7qf03.jpg

Side of that same pocket (left)

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Bottom of right rear pocket

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Crotch repair I was lazy on, will probably have to re-do later...

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Various crotch repairs. None very good. I need to try to patch it up with my mom's sewing machine..

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Rear right pocket that I need to repair, not sure how I am going to do that (result of carrying my ULock in it.)

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Another shot of it...

6sqq43n.jpg

Corner of that same right side pocket.

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im really diggin the jagged lines you used to repair the pockets... it adds a real 'homemade' touch to it imo.

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73nenht.jpg

Rear right pocket that I need to repair, not sure how I am going to do that (result of carrying my ULock in it.)

you need the new SEXIH03 cyclist jeans

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Before shinichi is inundated with requests perhaps he could comment on repair or providing thread?

i got in touch with shinichi recently about a repair kit for my skulls as well. i was sent everything needed for a small scale repair; a 3x3" swatch of thin denim and plenty of thread (#6 style for inseam and #20 style for everything else.) also here are pictures of my first repair from the evo thread... didn't notice this thread before... the denim patch used was from a pair of nudies. the denim provided by skull is on the thin side and seems more suitable for fixing up holes rather than reinforcing a particular area.

01.jpg

02.jpg

03.jpg

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How do you guys sew it all up? Put the needle through, flip jeans over, put it back in, flip it over, put it through, repeat x million ?

When I am not in possession of a sewing machine it's such a pain in the ass :(

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How do you guys sew it all up? Put the needle through, flip jeans over, put it back in, flip it over, put it through, repeat x million ?

When I am not in possession of a sewing machine it's such a pain in the ass :(

I have only done a very small repair on my back pocket and it was fairly painful on the fingers to push the needle through thick denim. I'm impressed by how much youve actually repaired by hand.

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that's what thimbles are for!

I have only done a very small repair on my back pocket and it was fairly painful on the fingers to push the needle through thick denim. I'm impressed by how much youve actually repaired by hand.

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I realised this afterwards as if sewing wasn't unmanly already now I'm wearing a thimble?

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I realised this afterwards as if sewing wasn't unmanly already now I'm wearing a thimble?

sewing unmanly? there is nothing more manly than being able to do shit yourself, and not having to rely on others.

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