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ziggerzagger

Current and Future Trends

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Hello denim aficionado's,

I have to give a presentation on current and future trends for denim mainly on fabric and finishes/washes.

Any help will be greatly appreciated

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Good luck with your homework assignment!

Nice one Cotton Duck - my sides!

Its part of an interview for a new job. I have my presentation ready but I wanted to make sure I wasn't missing any important trend.

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Then why don't you share what you have already and then ask us if you missed something?

Another thing you might consider is that for as long as superdenim has been around the only thing people on here are interested in is breaking in raw jeans themselves.

So much for your trends in washes and finishes.

Oh yes, some people still tend to like darted backpocket jeans that looks like they have been dipped in a bucket of bile...

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Then why don't you share what you have already and then ask us if you missed something?

Another thing you might consider is that for as long as superdenim has been around the only thing people on here are interested in is breaking in raw jeans themselves.

So much for your trends in washes and finishes.

Oh yes, some people still tend to like darted backpocket jeans that looks like they have been dipped in a bucket of bile...

Fair comment regarding superdenim but all the brands that are mentioned also do some quality jean finishes.

Surely when looking at the raw denim you must look at what is also on offer in the washed versions?

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Fair comment regarding superdenim but all the brands that are mentioned also do some quality jean finishes.

Surely when looking at the raw denim you must look at what is also on offer in the washed versions?

Most people on here consider a "quality finish" the ones that come closest to naturally worn in jeans, and while some of the brands that are discussed on here are indeed getting better at that, most of what they make with regards to hardwash jeans is still atrocious...

There are some brands who do indeed make "real" looking hardwashes, so call that at trend if you want, some brands are getting better at it.

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you were required to submit a presentation on denim washes for a job?

what are you applying for? Abercrombie and Fitch?

anyways as some sort of token contribution, read this

517eNU4Xt7L._SL500_AA240_.jpg

gives a brief history of denim (washes included!!!) and some good pictures

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you were required to submit a presentation on denim washes for a job?

what are you applying for? Abercrombie and Fitch?

anyways as some sort of token contribution, read this

517eNU4Xt7L._SL500_AA240_.jpg

gives a brief history of denim (washes included!!!) and some good pictures

Just ordered it - £10 including delivery - thanks.

Presentation is for UK based company - I know how to achieve all types of washing on denim and also dyeing - I just wanted to make sure I wasn't missing out on any current or future trend.

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"Trends" are the antithesis to the spirit of superdenim, and really, style is inseparable from individuality, so recommending overarching trends is of limited relevance. But I'll play along.

The overall trend is toward more traditional dressing and less denim (smart casual ubiquity, the tie and blazer Dior style, and skinny denim in general are becoming burnt out and there is growing demand for alternatives), therefore your trend to pitch; hybrids with the traditional wardrobe.

fantastic%20man%20acne%20jean%20gentleman%27s%20gert%20jonkers.jpg

Acne x Fantastic Man, pleated trouser cut jeans

denim_v.jpg

Denim suits for Jil Sander SS09

00120m.jpg

00110m.jpg

Acne x Lanvin SS09, blended cotton fabrics and light weight denim used for shirting, outerwear, shorts, trousers and blazers

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Just ordered it - £10 including delivery - thanks.

Presentation is for UK based company - I know how to achieve all types of washing on denim and also dyeing - I just wanted to make sure I wasn't missing out on any current or future trend.

Orly? Tell me the specific difference between rope and hankdying. I'm Interested!

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-Completely white horizontal stripes of indigo-less denim, about an inch thick throughout the entire jean.

-Washing out area's in cookie cutter like shapes (stars, snow flakes, etc.) for an allover print denim.

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Orly? Tell me the specific difference between rope and hankdying. I'm Interested!

I was talking about garment dyeing.

So you really want to know the specific difference between rope and hank dyeing? I think you already know but I will try to answer this.

I presume you are talking about Indigo dyeing - hank dyeing was the original method of Indigo dyeing - cotton fibres spun into a yarn and then many yarns tied into a hank (like a tied scarve of yarns) then it is dipped into the dyebath.

Rope dyeing for indigo is the commonest method for denim production - the spun yarns are twisted into rope like lengths and then dyed continuously on a dyeing range around 12-24 at a time.

The specific difference i beleive is that you get more indigo penetration using the original hank dyeing method than the rope dyeing method - this means more contrast is achieved quicker after wear/washing. This is my understanding but I am ready to be shot down.

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think you got it check this shizzz

Hank Dyed

The history of indigo in Japan originates back to the Edo period (mid-1700s) in the Bichu region. This traditional artisan technique is unique in that the indigo dyeing method used is not controlled automatically by machine. It is not “rope-dyed”, but “hank-dyed”. This means the dipping and oxidation process of the cotton yarn is done by hand by one designated man, known affectionately in Japan as “a living national treasure”! There can be as many as 30 dips into the indigo bath, and a beautiful natural irregularity of the caste and patina occurs due to human touch

Loop-Dyed Denim or Rope

Original Indigo denim was dyed using Loop Dyeing Machines. This is a process using rare and antique machines which feed a rope of cotton yarn through vats of indigo dye and then back out and up to the roof of the factory. It allows the indigo to oxidize before the rope returns down to the next vat. Evisu denim has a minimum of 16 dips and in some styles has 30 dips, hence the deep indigo color.

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-Completely white horizontal stripes of indigo-less denim, about an inch thick throughout the entire jean.

-Washing out area's in cookie cutter like shapes (stars, snow flakes, etc.) for an allover print denim.

That is soooooooooo last year

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whole jeans constructed of red line selvage....denim on the inside

quote me in your presentation but at least give me credit

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think you got it check this shizzz

Hank Dyed

The history of indigo in Japan originates back to the Edo period (mid-1700s) in the Bichu region. This traditional artisan technique is unique in that the indigo dyeing method used is not controlled automatically by machine. It is not “rope-dyedâ€, but “hank-dyedâ€. This means the dipping and oxidation process of the cotton yarn is done by hand by one designated man, known affectionately in Japan as “a living national treasureâ€! There can be as many as 30 dips into the indigo bath, and a beautiful natural irregularity of the caste and patina occurs due to human touch

Loop-Dyed Denim or Rope

Original Indigo denim was dyed using Loop Dyeing Machines. This is a process using rare and antique machines which feed a rope of cotton yarn through vats of indigo dye and then back out and up to the roof of the factory. It allows the indigo to oxidize before the rope returns down to the next vat. Evisu denim has a minimum of 16 dips and in some styles has 30 dips, hence the deep indigo color.

I have that thing bookmarked, super useful little guide

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