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The Great Outdoors

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I know a few of you guys do some hiking, mountaineering and exploring so has anyone got any recommendations for decent techwear for outdoor pursuits? Could be clothing, bags, equipment, etc.

Also, do you guys prefer synthetic or natural base layers?

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i value odor resistance over dry time because i'm a good weather hiker, so i prefer merino. if you're into hardcore mountaineering/survival type stuff the fast drying synthetics are better at keeping hypothermia at bay.

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Merino stays warm when wet, though. I have shied away from synthetics because I sweat too much for them to stay reasonably wearable on multi-day trips. Cotton kills. 

'Smartwool' can often be found on sale, and Costco also has decent merino base layers from time to time for cheap. I have started to wear Veilance and Outlier shirts now that they are old enough to fray and have holes. I usually pack a merino t-shirt and then a long sleeve to put on over top. Wool toque for taking breaks up high and in the evening, Arc'teryx down and shell, Fjallraven or Outdoor Research pants, Salomon boots.

I like ultralight gear: Hyperlite Mountain Gear backpack, MLD trailstar tarp shelter, Enlightened Equipment quilt... there is a plethora of excellent lightweight gear being produced by small cottage manufacturers based in the US (and elsewhere) these days. REI/MEC do pretty well for more conventional and available equipment at a more accessible price point.

 

 

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So I've been putting my Acronym gear through some hikes over the last few weeks. Unsurprisingly the Stotz (P24A-S) were horrible in warm weather, i lasted about an hour in them before i had to change into shorts.The shorts (Acronym SP3-X) were excellent though, even under really heavy rain i didn't feel they were unpleasant to wear. Last weekend i tried out a pair of P24A-DS on a challenging hike with a lot of inclines and declines in very warm weather. The pants were awesome, the stretch in the DS made movement effortless and i didn't feel too warm or uncomfortable in them at all, even more impressive considering the P24A's are pretty big pants with a lot of material.

Bootwise i'm rocking the Salomon Ultra-X2 Mids and they're super comfortable, pretty lightweight, great flexibility, grip and decent ankle support, and they're GoreTex. Apparently the Ultra X series run a bit thin so better suited for people with thinner feet like me. For anything short of serious mountains, they're a great boot imo. I had to size up a whole size for best fit though.

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A subject near and dear too me. I’m an advocate of the wind shirt method: base layer, then a wind shirt to create a microclimate, topped off with insulation. 

 

Most modern day insulation layers have enough DWR that you seldom need a hardshell (the most over rated garment in your wardrobe albeit the sexiest). In fact unless it’s really wet, I find most of my fleece jackets suffice.

 

As for boots, I prefer fast, light, and easy to dry rather than waterproofing that never holds out. Of course if you are in arctic conditions, or a climate that will actually give you frostbite, by all means opt for the most waterproof boot you can find. Otherwise, embrace the suck, wet feet won’t kill you, and an extra pair of sox is lighter than wet boots in the morning.

 

Wool > Synthetic. Camping hammocks rock. Life is better in the outdoors!

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On 8/7/2017 at 2:59 PM, Cornuto said:

As for boots, I prefer fast, light, and easy to dry rather than waterproofing that never holds out. Of course if you are in arctic conditions, or a climate that will actually give you frostbite, by all means opt for the most waterproof boot you can find. Otherwise, embrace the suck, wet feet won’t kill you, and an extra pair of sox is lighter than wet boots in the morning.

Can you (or anyone really) suggest some boots?  The now discontinued Nike SFB Trainers used to be my go-to, but alas I've outworn them and can no longer buy them.

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3 hours ago, piece keeper said:

Can you (or anyone really) suggest some boots?  The now discontinued Nike SFB Trainers used to be my go-to, but alas I've outworn them and can no longer buy them.

Try the SFB field 6.  Great support and grip.  I just got my SFB trainers, they're really comfy.  Looking for the black cw, I don't want to dirty up my khakis.  I've yet to hike in them tho. 

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20 hours ago, Flipflop214 said:

Try the SFB field 6.  Great support and grip.  I just got my SFB trainers, they're really comfy.  Looking for the black cw, I don't want to dirty up my khakis.  I've yet to hike in them tho. 

Oh yeah, actually I tried out the SFB 6 for a couple days and found them too rigid, especially in the toe box, so I returned em haha.  I was too used to the freedom and flexibility of the Trainers.

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^ I mean they're boots - should be a bit stiffer than the Trainers. I've been on the road in the Field 6" for the past month and can find almost 0 fault. Exactly what I've been wanting for a while, and no precious-ness.

Of course, if they were primarily for approach / mountaineering purposes, I'd go another direction. Am finding the versatility and aesthetic pretty unbeatable tho.

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the field 6" is great and i love mine but i would never hike in them. they're fashion boots.

for actual hiking salomon is unbeatable. the quest 4d is my favourite.

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How are they "fashion boots"?! Don't get me wrong, they're versatile enough to wear with techwear and other shit but they do perform as intended. Unless your perception of hiking is walking up a wet concrete hill, then yes.. field 6 is not going to perform well.  Visvim 7 hole are fashion boots. They're completely night and day. 

 

...

if you're straight up doing mountaineering (I'm exaggerating), I would go with what Ink is suggesting... I guess for a normal non technical hikes I'd suggest the field 6 

Edited by Flipflop214
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Only difference between the Field 6" and the fully AR 670-1 compliant model is leather and a couple extra eyelets...Outsole and ventilation are all the same otherwise. Definitely not fashion boots in the pejorative sense.

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1 hour ago, Inkinsurgent said:

the field 6" is great and i love mine but i would never hike in them. they're fashion boots.

for actual hiking salomon is unbeatable. the quest 4d is my favourite.

 

1 hour ago, Flipflop214 said:

How are they "fashion boots"?! Don't get me wrong, they're versatile enough to wear with techwear and other shit but they do perform as intended. Unless your perception of hiking is walking up a wet concrete hill, then yes.. field 6 is not going to perform well.  Visvim 7 hole are fashion boots. They're completely night and day. 

 

...

if you're straight up doing mountaineering (I'm exaggerating), I would go with what Ink is suggesting... I guess for a normal non technical hikes I'd suggest the field 6 

The Quest 4d also comes in their "Forces" sub-brand for miltary/LEO in triple black/coyote/od green. 

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3 hours ago, Appleseed said:

^ I mean they're boots - should be a bit stiffer than the Trainers. I've been on the road in the Field 6" for the past month and can find almost 0 fault. Exactly what I've been wanting for a while, and no precious-ness.

Of course, if they were primarily for approach / mountaineering purposes, I'd go another direction. Am finding the versatility and aesthetic pretty unbeatable tho.

How's the waterproofing on these boots? thinking of giving them a go this winter

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16 minutes ago, AnomalousTautology said:

How's the waterproofing on these boots?

No GTX liner, so it depends on how you prep them and what you're comparing too. They've got a gusseted tongue, but the non-AR 670-1 compliant models are just synthetic suede and canvas. If you're one of those people that wants a waterproof liner and wears gaiters when hiking, then these probably aren't for you. 

Like I alluded to before; if in the backwoods for days on end, I'd go with another boot. But for tromping around the city (and throwing in a random day hike here and there), they're great (but the leather versions would be more suited to wet winter conditions).

Edited by Appleseed

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I find the original SFB sole to be more flexible and comfy than the updated version. But the updated has a deeper, more aggressive lug pattern so it's a tradeoff.

I know everyone here seems to think the Hoka Tor Mid looks clunky, but I don't think they're bad on foot, and they're pretty much the most comfy boot I've ever owned, and I've owned a lot of boots. I also have had good luck with Merrell boots, thinking about picking up a pair of the new Moab's for this winter.

To be honest, I've hiked in Nike Free runs with no issues, love light fast footwear.

 

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1 hour ago, Cornuto said:

love light fast footwear.

 

100%. If I'm out for <4 hours, I'm usually just in trail running shoes

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Thanks everyone.  Point taken on boots being inherently stiffer.  I just meant that I'd been used to hiking in Salomons, trail running shoes, and the Nike SFB Trainers that the SFB 6 felt like a prison, but perhaps that would've changed if I broke them in longer?  I think the SFB Trainers were the perfect shoe for me, and I've put probably over a thousand miles on em, so I was looking for something more similar to that.

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2 hours ago, piece keeper said:

perhaps that would've changed if I broke them in longer?

I, for one, have noticed almost no break-in (and this seems to be a touted-advantage of the Nike Field boots by most of .mil people). There's always a couple of hours / day for my arch and heal to adjust from sneaker to boot (and vice versa) - but....

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9 hours ago, Flipflop214 said:

How are they "fashion boots"?! Don't get me wrong, they're versatile enough to wear with techwear and other shit but they do perform as intended. Unless your perception of hiking is walking up a wet concrete hill, then yes.. field 6 is not going to perform well.  Visvim 7 hole are fashion boots. They're completely night and day. 

 

this being the 'great outdoors' thread i assumed hiking meant 8hr hikes on unprepared trails under a self-sustaining load. for that, the sfb's don't offer the rigidity and support needed. for a 2 hr walk through a park they'll do fine (and they'll look much better than traditional hiking boots) but that seems a regular 'techwear' context to me.

 

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9 hours ago, Inkinsurgent said:

8hr hikes on unprepared trails under a self-sustaining load

Literally the use case the Field boot was developed (and incorporated by our armed forces world-wide) for, tho. I do think there's better options, especially if you want WP lining, tho-

 

(and to clarify, the Field boot has made some significant changes since the SFB, which was referenced in the ^last)

Edited by Appleseed
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11 hours ago, Inkinsurgent said:

this being the 'great outdoors' thread i assumed hiking meant 8hr hikes on unprepared trails under a self-sustaining load. for that, the sfb's don't offer the rigidity and support needed. for a 2 hr walk through a park they'll do fine (and they'll look much better than traditional hiking boots) but that seems a regular 'techwear' context to me.

Given that I've done a few multi-day backpacking trips in just the SFB Trainers, I think the SFB 6 would be mighty fine with more rigidity.  I've always found "traditional" hiking boots to be sub-par actually as they're often really heavy.  What happened to that adage "one pound on the foot equals five pounds on the back"?  Seems like a lot of hiking boots disregard that and end up making anchors.

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there's always a tradeoff between weight and rigidity. salomon and lowa are really good at making very lightweight yet rigid boots that have all the benefits of 'traditional' boots without most of their drawbacks. half of modern mid top hikers are essentially beefed up trail runners anyway.

edit: i think the real question here is when is nike finally going to reintroduce that goddamn 8" zip model

Edited by Inkinsurgent

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shopping?q=tbn:ANd9GcTgnbqJn-YMDkAzLBMcQ

These have been my goto for backpacking, though they say size .5 up and theres no 13.5, so i may switch over to some nike terra kiegers

 

air-zoom-terra-kiger-4-mens-running-shoe

 

Anyone backpack/hike these? 

 

Just got a granite gear crown60 pack, so far so good. Quite light and comfy, a nice step up from REI flash65 to a simple UL pack that still has some comfort features to it. Can be had for 150$ right now. Also glad to see packs coming in non zany outdoor brand colors. 

 

Granite-Gear-Crown2-Backpack.jpg[/IMG]

 

 

Edited by EG562

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15 hours ago, EG562 said:

Anyone backpack/hike these? 

Have been using the Terra Kiger 2's for a few seasons, the 'sticky rubber' sole (I don't know how different the TK3s are) has definitely worn a bit quicker than I expected. I don't baby them, and they've definitely been chewed up by lava rock, etc. TK3 looks like it might have improved upon some of the weak areas along the midsole / toebox area. Will probably pick up a new model whenever the next iteration hits-

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On 8/29/2017 at 8:08 AM, Appleseed said:

Have been using the Terra Kiger 2's for a few seasons, the 'sticky rubber' sole (I don't know how different the TK3s are) has definitely worn a bit quicker than I expected. I don't baby them, and they've definitely been chewed up by lava rock, etc. TK3 looks like it might have improved upon some of the weak areas along the midsole / toebox area. Will probably pick up a new model whenever the next iteration hits-

Is the main reason you bought them for comfort I assume? 

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11 hours ago, SoraL said:

Is the main reason you bought them for comfort I assume? 

Well, more for the low weight / slim profile. They fit quite well, but they're not ultra marathoners - wasn't looking for something super comfortable or stable.

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Guys need some advice.

Doing a trip to Vancouver/Seattle/Portland in late February and planning to go up to Whistler, as well as some hiking here and there.

Was eyeing the Hoka One One Ultra Tor Hi boots, but is it really necessary to have waterproof boots? Don't want to spend that much for only a couple of weeks wear, especially since I live in warmer climates usually..

Would I be able to get away with my Red Wing leather lace up boots ?

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