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booya

Dry Cleaning

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But you have to wear them 365 days without washing!!!

Shit, I though it was 6 months? Now all my denimz are worthless...:(

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I was told that by a cleaner. Perchloroethylene was the first chemical to be labeled carcinogenic and isn't officially banned anywhere in the US. This is still the primary chemical used, no?

it's banned in CA and NY.

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I dry cleaned my A.P.C. new cures a while ago. Worst fucking idea ever. I only did it because A.P.C.'s website said so.

They shrunk a whole heap (and didn't stretch back out) and the feel of the fabric is just gone (not just the starch).

I had gone a year and 3 months without washing them (but hardly any wear due to the fact I have to be in a suit during the week) and the smell was just too much. I was living in HK at the time and the humidity really gets to it).

what you are describing is a wash. just because you take something to a dry cleaners doesn't mean they are drycleaning them. you have to specify you want something drycleaned if it isn't dryclean only, otherwise they will wash. under no circumstances would dry cleaning shrink anything. it's completely impossible with the exception of wool and cashmere and that's only if they used excessive temperature for excessive time. also, it is VERY unlikely that ONE dry cleaning would take away from the stiffness of the jeans.

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^ True in theory, but in practice a small amount water often gets into the dry-cleaining fluid, which needs to be carefully filtered to be got rid of. As you know, in dry-cleaning the same chemicals are used over and over again, simply being filtered in between, and, when necessary, topped up as the fluid evaporates. Perchlorethelyne (and its close cousins) are "hydro-phylic" and gradually absorb water from the atmosphere, and also from the clothes put into it (which are often not completely dry to begin with). Also, garments are usually pre-treated ("spotted") with water-containing fluids to remove various water-based stains. If the dry-cleaner is not careful, or lazy, or just trying to save money, he or she will not change the filters or not bother to monitor the water content. If the water content gets high enough, you will see some shrinkage in cotton clothes, typically puckering along the seams. This is less a problem in modern systems, which are completely sealed and self-monitor, than it is with older ones.

The alternative to "perc" is hydrocarbon (petroleum) based fluid, which is actually a throw-back the 19th century when drycleaning was invented. When you see signs advertising "organic" dry-cleaning, this is generally the chemical they are using. This is a bit disingenuous, in my opinion, since it is based on the notion that petroleum, being a hydrocarbon, is an "organic" chemical in the strict sense of the word.

I used to work in a dry-cleaner as a summer job when I was a teenager. Not terribly entertaining work, I can tell you...

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Superfuture I need your help.

Here's the deal:

I took this (http://www.bblessing.com/shop/47175.html) Raf Simons S/S 08 shirt to a dry cleaning location in California over summer, and they somehow broke and lost some of the inserts within the shirt (If you can't see them, they are about three-quarters of the way down the shirt - two on the front, and two on the back. They are stitched into the shirt and say "Raf Simons" on them). Now, I am in New York. In a horrid attempt to be sly, the cleaners unstitched the seams concealing the inserts, removed some of the broken ones, and put the remaining halves of the inserts where the whole inserts used to be - some of them upside down (This is confusing, I know. It's much easier to see with pictures). The woman in charge has not been responding to phone calls, has not responded to e-mails, and did not show up when we were supposed to meet at the dry cleaning location. It has been well over 30 days, and I'm fed up with this. How would I go about getting my shirt back (which I can barely wear anymore since it is too cold) and getting money for the destroyed article and, essentially, wasting of my time? Shit is expensive and I need mah clothes.

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bring the receipt to the dry cleaners and if you get no satisfaction, go to the better business bureau.

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better business bureau will not produce anything fruitful

drycleaners will get put on their `blacklist`(which nobody cares about) and you`ll still be down a raf shirt

this must have been the shittiest dry cleaner lol

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^you're right. robbing them and vandalizing their store is your best bet as even if you don't get your money back, you'll feel better. or, pay it forward and ruin someone else's raf shirt.

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The owner is never at the cleaning location, and I'm not in the state. I had already tried to meet up with her numerous times before I moved, but she did not show up (traffic was her excuse).

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^shit, i dunno. i'm very selective even in NYC with who I go to. if I bring something in, i make them have a look at it if it has unusual construction to ensure they don't look like they've never seen something like it before.

for future refernce, just handwash or woolite or something. still think it's worth a call to BBB or the local business district if it was outside of la proper.

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hiring fukinese assassins to take her out would probably be cheaper than that shirt.

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One of the worst months of my life was working in a dry cleaner. Problem is, dry cleaners run on tight margins (you won't get super rich cleaning clothes). She's gonna duck you (and doznes of other former clients) 'till the End of Days. They move pretty quick in those joints, not much time to fuck or un-fuck something. Gotta keep things moving. Get online and trash her rep on any L.A.-based consomer/shopping site you can find. As for the BBB, only worth something if she's a member, and I bet she isn't. Caveat emptor.

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from my experience, your pretty much fucked.

i had a sweater that i took in to get dry cleaned and when it came out, it was so discolored, i couldnt even recognize the sweater anymore.

after a long 2 month dispute, i got nothing out of it.

you can try shitting on them online and in your community, but in the end, its lost effort.

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does anyone have any tips on cleaning expensive designer clothing after wearing it several times and getting dirt on them?

do any of you just clean them yourselves at home or take them to the dry cleaners and trust them not to mess up?

i just brought in my balmain biker sweats to my local drycleaners near me, my friend recommended it to me and it got pretty good reviews online, so i decided to give them a try, after i got my pants back, they totally butchered my pants, there was lint left over on them, and they added a new soap stain on them...i was furious, not sure weather to trust the dry cleaners again after this

2jcu0bt.jpg

i live in the LA area, so if anyone can recommend any superb drycleaners or tips, would be appreciated, and feel free to share your stories

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you take sweats to a drycleaner? drycleaner = chemicals = bad. Wash your own clothes.

didn't wanna fuck up a pair of balmain pants washing it myself

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if you are rich enough to buy balmain sweatpants, you shouldn't be taking clothes to a shitty local dry cleaner anyway

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if you are rich enough to buy balmain sweatpants, you shouldn't be taking clothes to a shitty local dry cleaner anyway

im not, i was recommended to take it there, and it cost me 7$ to dryclean it

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not a dry clean question but what the hell. need an atom bomb method to remove set stains that are very old. i've tried oxiclean and the baking soda/vinegar combo. both have worked a little, but i want it spanking new again.

shirt is a banker dress shirt. stains are on the white cuffs and collar.

Edited by swooc

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