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The WTF are u doing with your life thread

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tentpole, can't you just go over to the continent and pretty much study for free? if you're so worried about debt, surely that is an option.

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tru! i think tuition in germany is cheap... i think. that would be nice, but i feel like having to learn another language might slow me down a few notches in the education game tho. i am interested in taking at least one year of uni out abroad however...

thanks for the the positivity folks.

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Started looking into graduate school. WVU doesn't have a graduate program in what I am studying so im gonna have to go elsewhere and the application process seems super scary. Its about two years off for me so I probably shouldn't worry too much.

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tentpole, can't you just go over to the continent and pretty much study for free? if you're so worried about debt, surely that is an option.

 

So many ppl in England do not worry about debt because ... they know they will not repay it anyway, so if you can handle the fact that you will not earn over £21000 per year, you can be totally fine like fashion textiles students or music. 

 

Im a bit worried too but I know i'll have to travel around to find a good place for my job, im not scared to move abroad again anyway, if you are willing to move around, you'll find your place.

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got a big boy job doing software development =]

 

congratulation ed =]

 

I just got a marketing internship with aesop. 

Edited by jackg

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study graphic design in college right now, dont really know what to do after.

i wanna be a graphic designer in the near future and maybe go to university to master it more,
but look like a hard ass job with rare opportunity to find jobs ect.

Edited by aymerikmd

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got a big boy job doing software development =]

 

Congratz ! Enjoy your next shopping spree !

 

congratulation ed =]

 

I just got a marketing internship with aesop. 

 

Woop that's nice to hear that, is it a 6 months-long (or something) internship or on during your holidays? 

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thanks for the kind words. just for the next 3 months. a day with the international marketing team and a day with the Australian marketing team.

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i graduated with a design degree (media/graphic/web/etc) in 2010 and went on the hunt for agency work, but besides a four month internship at a product design firm, it was a struggle to find any legit jobs. an old friend from middle/high school eventually offered me a job at his car dealership and i jumped on board immediately—being an in-house creative director seemed better than an intern or jr position at an agency. I've been at the company for ~20 months now and gained a ton of experience so far: creating a brand, dealing with vendors, art directing freelancers... basically having creative freedom and a decent-sized budget. but in the end, i've been working in a silo—i'm the one creative in a team of four. the quality and efficiency of my work is plateauing because I'm only getting feedback from salesmen and GMs (who i really enjoy working with but really are in a different mindset, professionally). 

 

all of this, plus the drama of mixing work with friends, plus the fact that i can't ever see myself engaging with "car culture" although i really do appreciate them as design objects, is why i'm going back on the job hunt... I'm leaving my current position as creative director to go find an entry-level job at a design agency, preferably branding or web. it's really sad to leave a company that i was so deeply rooted in, but i feel like i'm back on the right career path. currently preparing my resume and portfolio; applying this week; hopefully getting hired in october...

 

i should prob just copy paste this all into my cover letter

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Anyone know how to successfully transition from one professional field to another?

I've been working as a paralegal for the last 4 years since graduating college in 2009. Originally, the idea was to go to law school, but after working with lawyers and seeing what law school has to offer (nothing but $110,000 of loan debt at a minimum), I've decided its time to make some changes and exit.

I've worked with a few friends and reworded my resume to emphasize things like project management, client/account relationships, instances where I've helped or contributed to ideas, making and/or saving the firm money, etc. I'm more curious to see what level jobs others may have transitioned to and from, the types of skills they emphasized, how they expanded their networks, and any overall pointers others who have been in my position may have.

Additionally, I've been studying for the GMAT and considering business school as a way to navigate through all of this.

tl;dr - want to transition to a new profession and am looking for advice on how to do so.

Edited by AngularDeath

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thought it might be time for a check in after a year and a half.

 

left my job of three years and starting a new one monday. same field and position but with a different brand. i was on a nice upward trajectory that plateaued sharply after some serious upper management mistakes + a culture of nepotism in the company. i began my job search about a year ago with a very cocky attitude thinking i could easily secure a job thanks to my skill set and connections.

 

what a humbling year it has been. applied for lots of jobs trying to work for cool brands, went on a ton of interviews, got frustrated, stopped looking, and picked it back up and finally secured a job. however, rather than trying to work somewhere "cool", i am doing what jack donaghy described as "going deeper into the crevasse" and working with an even more-mass market brand than where i was before, focusing my efforts on stacking as much money as humanly possible in order to fund my other endeavors. 

 

as tough as this past year was for me, it helped put things into perspective as to what is actually important to me in life. i picked up several new hobbies (yoga, DJing, starting boxing next week) and realized that i won't actually take any satisfaction from work until i am working for myself. i appreciate my girlfriend, friends and family even more for supporting me through a very selfish year. i was very wrapped up in material things but after amassing a pile of expensive clothing and pissing out a lot of champagne and cognac i have new goals: home ownership, more world travel, improving my health, supporting my friend's endeavors, and affecting things on a cultural level in my city.

 

tldr: i got a new job

i'm feeling this on a hunnid grand (except the world travel part)

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This is pretty idealistic but really rang true with me.

"How to do what you love"
http://www.paulgraham.com/love.html#f2n

I'm finishing my degree this year, can't wait, less motivated the closer i get to finishing, have some big projects to do which will be a struggle. I'm not intending to utilise my degree in the short term future so i guess that is a big reason behind it all.

Enjoyed the shit out of the start of this year, made myself a better, fitter, funner and better person. Got told by some people i care a lot about that i am one of the best people that they ever met and they loved me. this was great but conflicted with romantic life at the time. Karma is comin round lately though.

Next year intend to work 60hrs a week in hospitality and get a bank then go live in denmark, basque country, japan, brazil and sf/ny with friends i made on exchange for as long as possible.

Edited by jaac

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for a while parsons was ruining my life but then i took a semester off and worked intense fucking hours full time at an espresso bar in the chelsea market and now i can't fucking wait to have school begin ass fucking me again

 

but life still feels meaningless often

what i actually do with my life is hang w/ my cat my roommates live on the internet and spend too much money on nyc restaurants

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two years ago, i left australia to serve mandatory national service in singapore, where i was born. i slid through all that bullshit and forced my way into just doing clerical duties for my service. i was too proud to want to do anything useful since i put it in my head that i didn't want to do anything with this country and for hating the fact that i got ripped off a golden period of my life to really push it as a pro footballer (i was breaking into a team at the time of the call-up). in hindsight, i should have taken advantage of what was in front of me, i could have come back with experience as a firefighter instead of one as a 9-5 man.

 

i got a lot of shit to catch up on now...back into university next year, a license (i should have fucking done it back in high school), and working back the frame of being a footballer, a summer job, friends. sometimes it's all too overwhelming, i feel like i'm being pulled into different directions.

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currently at college doing an 'access to

Higher education' course (higher education being uni)

wanting to move to london and study fashion journalism there, not sure which uni though, been in contact with all 7 uni's up and down the uk that offer my desired course.

I honestly never wanted to go back into education, infact I shuddered at the thought.. yet here I am, on my way and loving every minute.

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starting my first 'real' semester at uni, 'real' because i've started and stopped three times and have a zero GPA and less 30% completion rate. 

 

feels really good though, cut back to just working one day a week so i'll still earn a bit of cash. going to do an associates in journalism while also studying japanese and then go study / teach abroad for a year or two in japan before resuming bachelors studies. i paid for the first installment of my schooling payment plan, paid for my car to get an oil change / check up, and even though i'm practically broke i'm satisfied with my (very basic) wardrobe at the moment and the direction i'm heading. 

 

feel like now that i'm not working as much, i'll have less desire to spend the money i'm making on stupid shit (stupid because i can't really afford it) like food and alcohol and save a bit and cop some jawnz on the side. start cooking more. start running more. 2013 was about setting everything up and now i'm getting shit done. 

 

lastly, among my credit courses i'm enrolled in a painting class. i can't fucking wait to start painting.

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^ you don't need a journalism degree to do journalism.

 

sincerely, a journalism student

it helps though, does it not? tell me more journo student?

aside from this, with every day that goes by, I see certain restraints in journalism, restraints that don't attract me. maybe I could go down the design route, I just don't know.

mind is well and truly open.

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with journalism i think your calling should definitely be to write. like always cloudy said, you can still do journalistic work studying design - just find proper internships and get experience doing so and eventually your work will be equally credible as someone who studied / went to school for journalism. if you're looking to work for a publication, there is almost always a suggested predisposed approach that aligns with their agenda or aesthetic.

 

i wanted to take a more diy approach with my interest in it, and focus less on working for publications and more producing my own work and kind of working freely in whatever field interests me. just something supplemental to have paired with whatever i'm going to actually major in. 

Edited by insted

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shit, I meant to pos you insted.

ive just literally finished a discursive piece on fashion and art combined, I do enjoy doing the research.

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it helps though, does it not? tell me more journo student?

 

 

It helps to get your hand held through the industry, the essential skills you need need (like how to stay on top of your email/do research and obtain information that may not exactly be accessible through google alone/how to bridge those connections with people like editors who will pay you to do work/how to do your taxes) but by and large your portfolio, and your most recent work will make the case for you to be eventually 'hired' as a staff writer/reporter than what you were studying in undergrad. Yes a journalism degree from a reputable university is a signifier to an employer that you will probably find it easier on your first month on the job than someone else, but experience is a much better teacher.

 

Do you want to be a journalist? I mean a real journalist, not a #fakeimportant mansplainer who contributes to Thought Catalog, has 1,000 followers on twitter, works an 'internship' (slave job) that's only quasi-media related, and eventually wind up doing PR for a start-up or social media or some other bullshit. A journalist has no social life, follows around public relations people, spends all day on Gmail/the phone, and does NOT have a balanced work-life schedule. Oh, and job security is virtually non-existent, you're constantly battling Buzzfeed for internet eyeballs in an attempt to justify the $22/hour you'd be making (that's being generous), all while getting spammed for nearly every spelling error that shows up in your copy because you're also doing the job of copyediting your work, a position that existed in ancient times (2003.)

 

It's important to really define what it is you want to be doing. I want to work at a place like Buzzfeed one day; I don't want to compete with grad students and career journalists for a staff job at the Washington Post, at least not yet. I want to cover things I'm interested in, not municipal politics.

 

If you want to be a journalist, go start doing journalism. You have a Twitter account right? Get one. Get a smartphone. Get a camera (an iPhone 5 or equivalent camera is fine now, by the by), and learn how to compose a picture like the ones you see on A1. Get a legitimate website (your "inspiration" tumblr doesn't count. Nobody gives a fuck that you know how to wear pants), write every day no matter what even if it's two lines about your bullshit roommates eating your peanut butter. You have to write. And you have to read as much as possible. Subscribe to actual magazines and pay attention to the people writing the things you read; they're your industry peers and you should address them as such. Disagree with an oped? Call the writer out on Twitter in a professional manner. Have a discussion with a real journalist. Email them. Let them know you exist, even if it's in a "I'd love to do what you're doing" type of way. It's nearly as important as being able to string a lede together in 4 minutes, as it is to be recognizable, in name, style, beat, and writing ability.

 

Don't fake anything. Nothing is more obvious than reading a piece where the writer themself doesn't understand the subject. Work. There are thousands and thousands of people who want to do what you want to do.

 

I'll never forget doing corporate relations for the GOVERNMENT (a PR mouthpiece job where I wrote press releases for journalists and worked with them directly, but I was really the anti-journalist, framing stuff) and seeing how many applications I was competing against when I got hired. It was approaching four digits. And this was for a summer student temp job.

 

I don't mean to come off as pessimistic (even though I really am), but I've seen the industry for what it is. And yes, if you work hard enough, there is a place for you in it, and in 2014, it's growing. But there's a lot of bullshit lurking, especially at the entrance gate. Ever work a 10 hour shift for free? I have. And I nearly became homeless because of it. That's another thing; save. Your. Pennies. I know a lot of people on sufu are trust fundies who get their tuition paid for, and that's great, but you have to realize the terms of engagement with internships. By and large, they're a crock. I was very fortunate to learn the hard way (through debt and having to pay for my way right from the jump) that if I was going to actually do this, I needed to figure out a way to sustain myself. And I did. But that doesn't mean I got asked to photocopy things and get coffee for the staff of a national magazine for 3 months before I clued in that I wasn't learning anything and was essentially the bitch boy. You'll find those. And you'll also find one or two people who see what's happening, take you under your wing, and mentor you. That's the true value in an internship; the connections you'll make. But despite what your faculty, peers and the companies handling internships might tell you, you can bridge those connections anywhere, at any time. Hang around. Pay attention. More people than you might realize pass you every day.

 

Okay I'm mad rambling now. tl;dr figure out what you want to do in media (find specific people doing what you want to do and MIRROR THE FUCK OUT OF THEM.), learn how to take pictures, write every day, spend at least a half hour a day straight READING. ARTICLES., get twitter, get a real website/portfolio (an excellent opportunity to learn simple web design/coding, a skill that's increasingly more valuable), get a camera and shoot everything, email journalists, participate in journalism, and write as much as fucking possible. Figure out the true value of your time, and from there, go forth amongst internships. But if you're legitimately good at something, unless it's for a favour or a labour of love, never give it away for free. You're a business, man.

 

.02

 

 

EDIT: Dug up a post from Justin Ling that you should absolutely read if you're serious about this freelance rap shit (er, journalism) http://demarchy.ca/post/44971169975/freelance-journalism-the-money-the-job-the-mouse

Edited by its always cloudy

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It helps to get your hand held through the industry, the essential skills you need need (like how to stay on top of your email/do research and obtain information that may not exactly be accessible through google alone/how to bridge those connections with people like editors who will pay you to do work/how to do your taxes) but by and large your portfolio, and your most recent work will make the case for you to be eventually 'hired' as a staff writer/reporter than what you were studying in undergrad. Yes a journalism degree from a reputable university is a signifier to an employer that you will probably find it easier on your first month on the job than someone else, but experience is a much better teacher.

Do you want to be a journalist? I mean a real journalist, not a #fakeimportant mansplainer who contributes to Thought Catalog, has 1,000 followers on twitter, works an 'internship' (slave job) that's only quasi-media related, and eventually wind up doing PR for a start-up or social media or some other bullshit. A journalist has no social life, follows around public relations people, spends all day on Gmail/the phone, and does NOT have a balanced work-life schedule. Oh, and job security is virtually non-existent, you're constantly battling Buzzfeed for internet eyeballs in an attempt to justify the $22/hour you'd be making (that's being generous), all while getting spammed for nearly every spelling error that shows up in your copy because you're also doing the job of copyediting your work, a position that existed in ancient times (2003.)

It's important to really define what it is you want to be doing. I want to work at a place like Buzzfeed one day; I don't want to compete with grad students and career journalists for a staff job at the Washington Post, at least not yet. I want to cover things I'm interested in, not municipal politics.

If you want to be a journalist, go start doing journalism. You have a Twitter account right? Get one. Get a smartphone. Get a camera (an iPhone 5 or equivalent camera is fine now, by the by), and learn how to compose a picture like the ones you see on A1. Get a legitimate website (your "inspiration" tumblr doesn't count. Nobody gives a fuck that you know how to wear pants), write every day no matter what even if it's two lines about your bullshit roommates eating your peanut butter. You have to write. And you have to read as much as possible. Subscribe to actual magazines and pay attention to the people writing the things you read; they're your industry peers and you should address them as such. Disagree with an oped? Call the writer out on Twitter in a professional manner. Have a discussion with a real journalist. Email them. Let them know you exist, even if it's in a "I'd love to do what you're doing" type of way. It's nearly as important as being able to string a lede together in 4 minutes, as it is to be recognizable, in name, style, beat, and writing ability.

Don't fake anything. Nothing is more obvious than reading a piece where the writer themself doesn't understand the subject. Work. There are thousands and thousands of people who want to do what you want to do.

I'll never forget doing corporate relations for the GOVERNMENT (a PR mouthpiece job where I wrote press releases for journalists and worked with them directly, but I was really the anti-journalist, framing stuff) and seeing how many applications I was competing against when I got hired. It was approaching four digits. And this was for a summer student temp job.

I don't mean to come off as pessimistic (even though I really am), but I've seen the industry for what it is. And yes, if you work hard enough, there is a place for you in it, and in 2014, it's growing. But there's a lot of bullshit lurking, especially at the entrance gate. Ever work a 10 hour shift for free? I have. And I nearly became homeless because of it. That's another thing; save. Your. Pennies. I know a lot of people on sufu are trust fundies who get their tuition paid for, and that's great, but you have to realize the terms of engagement with internships. By and large, they're a crock. I was very fortunate to learn the hard way (through debt and having to pay for my way right from the jump) that if I was going to actually do this, I needed to figure out a way to sustain myself. And I did. But that doesn't mean I got asked to photocopy things and get coffee for the staff of a national magazine for 3 months before I clued in that I wasn't learning anything and was essentially the bitch boy. You'll find those. And you'll also find one or two people who see what's happening, take you under your wing, and mentor you. That's the true value in an internship; the connections you'll make. But despite what your faculty, peers and the companies handling internships might tell you, you can bridge those connections anywhere, at any time. Hang around. Pay attention. More people than you might realize pass you every day.

Okay I'm mad rambling now. tl;dr figure out what you want to do in media (find specific people doing what you want to do and MIRROR THE FUCK OUT OF THEM.), learn how to take pictures, write every day, spend at least a half hour a day straight READING. ARTICLES., get twitter, get a real website/portfolio (an excellent opportunity to learn simple web design/coding, a skill that's increasingly more valuable), get a camera and shoot everything, email journalists, participate in journalism, and write as much as fucking possible. Figure out the true value of your time, and from there, go forth amongst internships. But if you're legitimately good at something, unless it's for a favour or a labour of love, never give it away for free. You're a business, man.

.02

EDIT: Dug up a post from Justin Ling that you should absolutely read if you're serious about this freelance rap shit (er, journalism) http://demarchy.ca/post/44971169975/freelance-journalism-the-money-the-job-the-mouse

I really need to get my arse into gear regarding my portfolio, nothing has been 'added' as such, but I gotta take my maths GCSE again due to it being shit (rest is fine), so I have an extra year to get my head down and think.. but how mathematics comes into journalism regarding uni applications, I dunno! suppose universities are inching that 'bar' upwards a little each year for a collection of reasons.

Thats where I get a tad 'wishy washy' regarding my possible future in journalism. writing is my niche I guess. I like it.. do i love it? er, sometimes, I suppose..what I happen to be writing on at that particular time is the basis to the answer. I was just sitting down thinking about how restrictive journalism may be initially and if I could deal with them specific boundaries as such, then my mind was wandering and I thought maybe more hands on route, somewhere my nature can flourish. This is aint a kanye-type rooftop boast, but I DO regard myself as creative.. always been drawing, and I feel like I have alot of 'ideas' of the creative spectrum to give. I make a half-decent researcher when I pull my finger regarding college, and I truly LOVE researching, could do it all day.

I dont actually have Twitter, about the only one I dont have an account to. And I dont read half as much as I should. Fantastic advice though iac, nice one bud.I just did a little simple discursive at college. Gimme yer email and ill send it over to you, and you can have a look when you got 2 secs (1500w).

Edited by Arwhyayen

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I really need to get my arse into gear regarding my portfolio, nothing has been 'added' as such, but I gotta take my maths GCSE again due to it being shit (rest is fine), so I have an extra year to get my head down and think.. but how mathematics comes into journalism regarding uni applications, I dunno! suppose universities are inching that 'bar' upwards a little each year for a collection of reasons.

Thats where I get a tad 'wishy washy' regarding my possible future in journalism. writing is my niche I guess. I like it.. do i love it? er, sometimes, I suppose..what I happen to be writing on at that particular time is the basis to the answer. I was just sitting down thinking about how restrictive journalism may be initially and if I could deal with them specific boundaries as such, then my mind was wandering and I thought maybe more hands on route, somewhere my nature can flourish. This is aint a kanye-type rooftop boast, but I DO regard myself as creative.. always been drawing, and I feel like I have alot of 'ideas' of the creative spectrum to give. I make a half-decent researcher when I pull my finger regarding college, and I truly LOVE researching, could do it all day.

I dont actually have Twitter, about the only one I dont have an account to. And I dont read half as much as I should. Fantastic advice though iac, nice one bud.I just did a little simple discursive at college. Gimme yer email and ill send it over to you, and you can have a look when you got 2 secs (1500w).

 

occupation: creative

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my girlfriend is a journalist and is actually in the US for a year working at a business journal in colorado. i'm not sure what its like over there, but here (australia) its so competitive for jobs after graduating from uni (unless you studied engineering) that many grads often take months to find work and are unemployed in the meantime or are notoriously 'underemployed'. anyway, she applied and took a position that no one else in the state wanted - a tiny, rural newspaper in the absolute middle of nowhere that paid almost nothing to write about the local primary school's sports day, an old 'famous' koala dying and petrol prices going up and down. not exactly thrilling writing, but she stuck with it and after 2yrs another opportunity came up which then lead to a new job offer by fairfax media (australia's biggest media company) and then an offer in colorado. as mentioned above, throughout the whole process she has stayed incredibly active online - through her blog, facebook, twitter and linkedin. if you don't have a (professional) online presence, no one is going to know about your work.

tldr: we all gotta start somewhere.

edit - i should say i am incredibly proud/jealous of her, as she's only 23 and has been passionate about journalism for a number of years whilst i'm almost 27 and still sorta floating around with a psych degree.

edit x2 - not sure if journalism is for you, you seem to contradict yourself a lot and if you have a portfolio but nothing has been 'added' then it isn't a portfolio - its nothing.

Edited by conqueror

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i think the point is, as far as journalism (and several career options) goes/go - you need to grind, grind, and grind. it's not going to be flashy, it's going to be bitter and brutal. honestly, taking a journalism course or minoring in journalism is really not a bad idea at all, because it teaches you how to properly structure your research and how to formulate opinions without sounding biased. also you get basic copy/editing insight, a few courses in media, and some computer courses. 

 

as far as a major in journalism - i don't know, i mean a degree is a degree, but i don't know. i think a great idea if you want to set yourself up to be a writer or anything field specific is to get a minor in it, and couple it with a more broad major. that way you get the advantage of casting a wide net, and you have some special skills related to what you want to do.or get an entry level internship and really prove yourself (which will already require an associates at least, so idk, whatever you think works best). journalism happens to work p well as an associates because it implies critical thought and developed research skills. not saying it's the best option, i happen to think it makes a lot of sense. although i think you're better off doing an associates in something first to at least see if you like the coursework, rather than going ahead and declaring a major/minor. idk if you can do that where you live, not sure how the degree plans work. if you can take a few classes here and there before finalizing on what you are fully studying, i would definitely recommend playing around and getting a feel for what you like.

Edited by insted

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what is your point?

 

dressed by the internet is one thing

occupation by the internet is completely stupid

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