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just got accepted to my second masters today

 

dual M.ARCH/MS.RED 

 

good lookin out appleseed

 

#blackcardera

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question for mr.invincible (or anyone else who can advise):

 

I'm currently studying arch. engineering, which I'm really enjoying, but looking at my future curriculum it doesn't look like I'll be learning as much as I'd like about the design aspects of architecture.  Do you think it would be realistic (or even possible?) to enter an m.arch program after obtaining my bachelor's?  I'm thinking that going that route would be the best for me, plus I'd have a technical background to fall back on.

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question for mr.invincible (or anyone else who can advise):

 

I'm currently studying arch. engineering, which I'm really enjoying, but looking at my future curriculum it doesn't look like I'll be learning as much as I'd like about the design aspects of architecture.  Do you think it would be realistic (or even possible?) to enter an m.arch program after obtaining my bachelor's?  I'm thinking that going that route would be the best for me, plus I'd have a technical background to fall back on.

 

yes, realistic and possible

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question for mr.invincible (or anyone else who can advise):

 

I'm currently studying arch. engineering, which I'm really enjoying, but looking at my future curriculum it doesn't look like I'll be learning as much as I'd like about the design aspects of architecture.  Do you think it would be realistic (or even possible?) to enter an m.arch program after obtaining my bachelor's?  I'm thinking that going that route would be the best for me, plus I'd have a technical background to fall back on.

 

totally and i would have gone that route too. 

 

i think the only downside to that is the contents for your admission portfolio, which you can easily make up for if you do one of those summer programs at UCBerkeley, GSD, UCLA, or even here at Columbia. I suspect being in engineering you wont get alot of designs out. However,  If you don't do the summer programs it's not a total rejection. Ive seen many portfolios with just sketches and other random shit. but definitely visit archinect.com and search around as you are preparing to apply.

Edited by mr.invincible

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The issue of developing a portfolio was exactly my concern for going that route.  At first I was considering minoring in architecture but the workload would be astronomical considering how fast-paced the curriculum at my university is.  A summer program seems like a very good solution.

 

I've been browsing archinect.com for a month or so now.  Since i'm nowhere close to being an actual architect right now I can't contribute much to the threads, but reading through them is helping me get a sense of how the academic and professional worlds of architecture function.

 

Thanks for the advice everyone!

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it's not just obscene tuition, it's kids getting degrees in worthlessness with no desirable skills or mobility

 

i'm not saying everyone should study STEM but you should think twice before majoring in art history with no relevant internships and poor grades

+1

people forget that the fields not directly related to material production was historically exclusive to the aristocrat/gentry class. who else besides ballers can fund a life that devotes it's time to studying art and literature? it's so redundant of undergraduate ba's saying how useless their degree is; of course it is! even my young cousin who sells shitty non-rare magic cards on ebay knows the current society is geared towards economy and industry. the order from above is: make, don't think.

 

a firm i interned at a while ago relegated all these inexperienced BA's to the sales division because they so convincingly spoke of their 'superior analytic and communication skills.' mediocre grades in a psychology or journalism major just says you can get sit still and get through assessments. what's not evident to them is the fact that undergrad material is so easily obtainable and self taught, specially with online communities focussing on them. i gatecrashed this political science seminar once and was introduced to this really senior guy doing a masters; a friend told me how he was one of the smarter dudes in the cohort even though he took some unrelated studies 15 years ago.

a boy scout sash is more valuable than ba and (some) bsc certificates. we need more people who can build skyscrapers for oil princes and not know why.   

 

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yeah. fuck knowledge and culture outside $$$$$.

Even though what roundhouse wrote was pretty tongue-in-cheek, I don't think that's the point either way: it was more "don't pursue art & culture as a secure career path" rather than "fuck knowledge and culture outside $$$"

Edited by Deux_Oiseaux

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one out of a hundred will follow this advice and do something worthwhile. the other 99 will jerk off and play xbox all day, because that too will make them happy.

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Doing Bachelor of Political, Economic and Social Sciences at University of Sydney, starting in March 2015

Just got done enrolling, major in political economy, optional major in film studies (For now) 

Already picked up some reading, and managed to lose my copy of the Wealth of Nations in one day

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anyone who's going into first year or is in first year have as much fun as possible, it's easy as fuck and doesn't matter that much

 

knuckle down in the second year

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if something in the liberal arts captivates you enough that you're willing to make some sacrifices, i don't see why it's disagreeable. most liberal arts students i know, including myself (one of my degrees will be a BA), just sort of want to do their own thing and pursue their own interests as much as possible in life. this may be aristocratic, but why should that matter? just don't have a family and don't be involved romantically with someone who demands a lifestyle outside of your means post graduation. maybe this is an easier thought for me to accept than others, though. 

 

I think you are missing the point. There is absolutely nothing wrong with living your life the way you mentioned. The problem is that in the US, getting said BA can cost up to 200K, which will end up handicapping you financially for life while not providing you with any marketable skill. Unless you attend a very well regarded college, I don't think paying more than 2-3K a year for liberal art studies is a smart financial option.

 

I know quite a few people who attended very prestigious colleges, but are head deep in student debt while struggling to built a career because they choose a useless major (english, woman studies, etc) while some of their classmates who made better choices are building very fulfilling careers (and in many cases making bank). 

Edited by Kasper

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Re: Discussion on useful/not useful majors and stuff

This spring ill be finishing my BA in Math (minor in stats/music), which sounds weird, but BA vs BS was that I have way more freedom to take classes i'm interested in (i've taken english/sociology/music for multiple semesters), plus BS is essentially prep for grad school, which I probably wouldn't go to for math. Granted math is still interesting to me and I enjoy it, there are definitely a lot options and easy ways to get more marketable skills but kids aren't often pushed in those directions because college is such a huge industry at this point and getting tuition money matters more than leaving kids in debt to the institution. But the huge change is that a bachelors is not the way to a decent job the way it was for many baby boomers, yet it still is marketed as such. 

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Ideally Universities' role is not only to set you up for a career, but also to create citizens. However, if you are pragmatic you will not pay tens of thousands of dollars to study something that isn't going to get you your money back. Unless you're from a rich family.

 

I think that as a society we need to move towards msking university attendance as accessible as possible and making the degree that graduates leave with as useful as possible.

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nvm lol  

 

Edited by haploid

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I originally wanted to try for a masters in Architecture after I finished my BS in Arch. Engineering, but now that I'm getting some work experience in the field I might just stick with structural engineering. I like the work enough (I'll probably like it more once I get out of the basic stuff and into advanced structural design), but the 8-6 life doesn't leave much time for my creative pursuits.

 

Some days I get really into my own projects, be it writing or design or whatever, and get a small panicking feeling that this is what I really want to do and I'm not in the right major and I'm going to be unfulfilled etc, but I think most of these creative projects I have going are just things I need to do once to get out of my system, not things to build a career out of.

Edited by Schoon

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About to graduate in March with a BA in Business Economics. No clue what I'm gonna do after that except hopefully work a relevant job. My resume is pretty shitty too so gg I guess.

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About to graduate in March with a BA in Business Economics. No clue what I'm gonna do after that except hopefully work a relevant job. My resume is pretty shitty too so gg I guess.

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Ideally Universities' role is not only to set you up for a career, but also to create citizens. However, if you are pragmatic you will not pay tens of thousands of dollars to study something that isn't going to get you your money back. Unless you're from a rich family.

 

I think that as a society we need to move towards msking university attendance as accessible as possible and making the degree that graduates leave with as useful as possible.

 

and then... politicians.

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