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PeterJ

What are you listening at right now

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upon closer inspection you must be insane

country house

the universal

he thought of cars obviously

dan abnormal

entertain me

yuko and hiro

the good version of to the end

its like a blur greatest hits CD

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you think so? great escape and parklife are my 2 favorite blur albums
upon closer inspection you must be insane

country house

the universal

he thought of cars obviously

dan abnormal

entertain me

yuko and hiro

the good version of to the end

its like a blur greatest hits CD

yo

The Great Escape has little to no soul. It is a plastic album conceived by a depressed, material, and simultaneously genius Damon Albarn. By all breakdown, its hit after hit after hit, but the problem is, the narrative is too self-interested and many of the songs are overproduced, leading to the album to have this cold, distant, and frankly uninteresting tone all throughout. "He Thought of Cars" "The Universal" and "Yuko and Hiro" are really the only good songs on the entire album, the rest being toss-off's that the b-sides for TGE could've and still trump to this day. Parklife on the other hand is completely focused, has no errors or bumps in its delivery, has held up the test of time, and continues to be easily one of my most favorite albums ever. But the trilogy that Modern Life is Rubbish, Parklife, and The Great Escape inhabit is one that truly ends on a poor note because of the pressure for Blur to only produce the two former albums once again. I can listen to TGE at any point of the day because Blur are probably my most favorite band, but in the grander picture and musicology of the band, its a blemish of mediocrity.

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i'd say i agree, and that the reasons you don't like the album are some of the reasons i do (overproduced, cold, distant, and frankly uninteresting tone). to me its those qualities that make tge true britpop.

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i'd say i agree, and that the reasons you don't like the album are some of the reasons i do (overproduced, cold, distant, and frankly uninteresting tone). to me its those qualities that make tge true britpop.

See, if I wanted true Britpop, I'd be listening to Ocean Colour Scene or Menswear, something that was completely a product of the music scene after Blur/Oasis/Pulp made a name for themselves. In terms of cold/distant/frankly uninteresting, it gets no better than This is Hardcore or Be Here Now. I consider those two the death knell of Britpop, and since Blur completely changed tact with Blur and were silent for the end years of Britpop (late-'97 to '98, into '99), they completely disassociated themselves with the sound, and specifically The Great Escape. This is Hardcore is an amazing album as opposed to Be Here Now because it was actually embracing that sound because of the state Pulp were in at the time, Be Here Now is just a testament to how Oasis really couldn't write songs outside the Beatles/Stones/Inspiral Carpets vein without sounding like utter knobs, as compared to their endearingly cheesy knob persona for their first two albums. Shit man, I could write a whole series of books on this.

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See, if I wanted true Britpop, I'd be listening to Ocean Colour Scene or Menswear, something that was completely a product of the music scene after Blur/Oasis/Pulp made a name for themselves. In terms of cold/distant/frankly uninteresting, it gets no better than This is Hardcore or Be Here Now. I consider those two the death knell of Britpop, and since Blur completely changed tact with Blur and were silent for the end years of Britpop (late-'97 to '98, into '99), they completely disassociated themselves with the sound, and specifically The Great Escape. This is Hardcore is an amazing album as opposed to Be Here Now because it was actually embracing that sound because of the state Pulp were in at the time, Be Here Now is just a testament to how Oasis really couldn't write songs outside the Beatles/Stones/Inspiral Carpets vein without sounding like utter knobs, as compared to their endearingly cheesy knob persona for their first two albums. Shit man, I could write a whole series of books on this.

yes you can. do it, its interesting stuff. maybe write a music blog, i'd read it.

also, have you seen the documentary about him remaking "Monkey: Journey to the West" ?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/index.html?curid=8854521

ETtDvHcEQH4

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yes you can. do it, its interesting stuff. maybe write a music blog, i'd read it.

also, have you seen the documentary about him remaking "Monkey: Journey to the West" ?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/index.html?curid=8854521

ETtDvHcEQH4

Nah, I have Monkey, and the music itself is great, but I don't find it holds my attention considering that Damon Albarn has put out immaculate records like Demon Days and The Good, The Bad, & the Queen in recent memory that immediately trump Monkey. Maybe if it comes to the US, I'd see it to get the full experience, but otherwise its meh for me.

i wouldn't ♥

neither would I

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kila_kila_kila.jpg

I love the boredoms and have just been checking this out.. Super Aesome.

EDIT: Also, I went to see Deerhunter the other night here in Vancouver.. What a show. Wow.

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basia-bulat.jpg

Basia Bulat - Oh, My Darling

definitely my favorite album right now, have been listening at least once a day for the past 2 weeks

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