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denim update....apc and nudie pics

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haha, ya i just bought a pair for the winter was curious how they would look in a few months. They are solid black but seem to bleed pretty easily, almost blue looking.

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Is there a much larger selection in the store than on the website?

I'm going to see if I can stop by next weekend to see for myself, but I am very impatient...

Edited by 134 on Oct 15, 2005 at 01:50 PM

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this is kind of off topic, but seems the best thread for some jeans porn.

woodi-evisu.jpg

5 years old fake thai evisus washed 4 times, they belong to my friend. the selvedge is fuzzy, i.e not real.

indigo + wear is all you need, the pics don't show the dark blues very well, but these have some serious contrast.

teisco.gif

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Nice pics everyone.

What happens to the creases (esp. honeycombs) when you wash your jeans? Do they just go a bit soft then reform again in the same place once they're dry and starched/worn?

The important thing before I report in... my position.

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When I bought My APC new stanards form the SOHO store I never got an APC badge!!!Unfair!!I'll post pics soon!!!

ahhh.....ahahahaha..............hgahahahhaahha......fashion................sex..................drugs............................girls.....uhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh.........sneakers..............................................

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Quote:

When I bought My APC new stanards form the SOHO store I never got an APC badge!!!Unfair!!I'll post pics soon!!!

--- Original message by richardb on Oct 16, 2005 07:10 AM

same here

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wow... u cant even compare these two brands... nudie is more conservative than evisu.

Evisus is radical... i used to love evisu, but two many people have evisus... if i was thinking of getting evisus, i would get some bondage just to be radical!!!

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Quote: What happens to the creases (esp. honeycombs) when you wash your jeans? Do they just go a bit soft then reform again in the same place once they're dry and starched/worn?

they fade because the indigo has faded from the creases.....if the honeycombs, wiskers, ect....are your natural fold and crease lines then i would assume that they would continue to do so after you wash em.....thats what my apc's are doing....btw, i gotta take better pics soon. after a couple days of wearing my newly rinsed apc's....they are starting to get better contrasting then when they were originally taken out of the wash.....

btw, my thread has been succcesfully jacked.....lol

F**K HYPE

solecollector.com

getlifted.net

overstand.net

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I know why they fade. I asked if the folds and creases (ESPECIALLY THE HONEYCOMBS, because in this case the folds are quite complex) will reform in the same way. I think if they are washed for long enough that they would probably reform noticeably differently.

The important thing before I report in... my position.

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if you give them like a full on machine wash no they will not refold in the same place.

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Nudie=Evisu

Interesting concept... In a way i think he has a point but maybe he didn't mean to make it...

Nudie have done very well on their dry denim and in particular dry selvage, with many people in the public arena thinking they have somehow rediscovered the wheel.

Evisu did this same very thing through clever marketing, with their "unique" idea of using narrow width shuttle looms.

They have been many brands around using dry selvage denim far before either Nudie and Evisu, however, they both get incredible credit for ther respective products. Lets face it raw/dry denim is how denim was always worn, not even 20 years ago.

Lesson here boys and girls is that marketing makes the market...

I hope indigo doesn't cause cancer...

... could you hand me the dental floss

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anyways......ill get this back on topic....here are those rinsed apc's after i wore them a bit more, after wearing them around for a while, i found that the contrasting started to come out much better....and look they have honey combs.....lol....fantastic.....im so glad i rinsed em....too bad i wore em when they were still wet so they stretched pretty easily...oh well...when they get the hot water wash it will be much better.....couple more months and these should be ripe for the picken....

eq48jd.jpg

eq48kn.jpg

F**K HYPE

solecollector.com

getlifted.net

overstand.net

Edited by kixslf on Oct 17, 2005 at 02:54 AM

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How come your APCs always look so light in all your pics. Is it the lighting/flash, or are your jeans really that light blue?

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yo can you post a pic of yourself wearing these? I wanna see how slim they are.

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kixslf

Those APCs are one wash off raw right, worn for four months...

Unless the lighting is deceiving that denim looks like it is a 2 dip perhaps 4 dip at the most.

Im not familiar with APC... is this how all their denim is like?

I hope indigo doesn't cause cancer...

... could you hand me the dental floss

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^Could you elaborate on the "dip" process?

I read that Sugar Cane was 32 dip, but what does that mean?

The amount of times its dyed?

Prefiero morir de pie que vivir siempre arrodillado

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I've washed my pair of APCs once in warm water with laundry detergent, and they look much darker than that.

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You are right that dip process is the amount of times it is "dyed", (i just posted a little message on another thread about dipping lol)

32 seems excessive though, the most I have ever really used was about 18 and this was excessive. Most commercially available denim is about 4-10 times. But the other thing to remember is that 32 dips at one place may get the same amount of indigo bound to the fibres as a 10 dip at another place. It really depends how good the technicians and equipment is.

Regarding your question

dipping is a process that is virtually unique to indigo dying. It is necessary because indigo is insoluble in water, so the indigo has to be reduced (makes it soluble) so it can be used as a dyestuff. Furthermore, indigo and cotton do not bind well to each other so only a little indigo will actually penetrate the fibre each time the yarn is dipped.

So the process is the yarn (warp) is formed into a rope and pulled through a dying bath. it is then systematically removed from the bath excess indigo removed and left to oxidise. This oxidisation makes the indigo insoluble again and therefore bound semi-permanently to the cotton.

This process is repeated lots of times to produce sequentially darker shades. It is interesting to note after about 10 dips in a reasonable dyehouse the yarn will be nearly totally saturated... Therefore any further dips will merely oxidise indigo on the surface of the fabric and not be of benefit to the fabric's colour at all.

Note though that there are other methods less modern as the rope dyeing procedure, like hank that may need more dips than the standard.

edit - just as a sidenote, i would be very interested to see if anyone actually makes hank dyed denim though, would cost a fortune.

I hope indigo doesn't cause cancer...

... could you hand me the dental floss

Edited by johninger on Oct 17, 2005 at 06:30 PM

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Interesting man, so the yarn can only take so much indigo. Like the human body can only use so much vitamin C, the rest you will just piss out. Makes sense.

I have a denim swatch here that says 16 dip. I have also heard of 24/32 dip. Do you think it's overkill when they do to many dips? Maybe thats why high quality denim bleeds so much onto shoes, furniture etc.....plus of course, it hasn't been washed.

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yeah you are right andewhall.

Like i said the yarn is saturated at about 10 dyes in most dyehouses i have ever worked with.

from then on the indigo that is being oxidised at each step would just sit on top of the fabric and like you said bleed straight off it, obviously more does bind to fibre each time but point of diminishing returns is at about 6 dips i guess.

As you may have picked up Indigo and cotton binding is very unstable.

I think it is overkill. For instance the most famous mills that everyone talks about here would use maximum (very maximum) of 16 dips unless some designer insisted cause firstly it will not improve the denims colour qualities at all and secondly handling this all the way through the manufacturing/retailing process is difficult.

Jeans like nudie raw ralph is sulphur topped to give that black look. They would be maximum of 6-8 dips but also have sulphur (black dyestuff). The APCs that i have seen on this site look no more than 2-6 dips. Kurabo, one of the main narrow width producers in the world produces majority of 2 dip denim for their flagship selvage stuff.

The crazy japanese brands like sugarcane seem to do this as a way to distinguish, because bleeding is considered an erroneous dye process rather than something to be proud of (ie. either bad oxidising process or wrong concentrations etc.)

I would be interested to talk to you about those swatches are they selvage do they bleed on a wet handkerchief, if they are selvage is the whites of the selvage bled on...

I hope indigo doesn't cause cancer...

... could you hand me the dental floss

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