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so twisted

Lofts?

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Hello all - This isn't really fashion oriented, but I know there are some users on here that have a good sense of interior design and products. So with that - I just rented a brand new loft in NY and I'm looking for ideas and products for putting up walls that stray from the traditional sheet rock / construction type. Anyone have any experience in this? Ease of installation is important, as is cost and design. Was thinking perhaps frosted glass, metal, wood, whatever... Any help would be very appreciated. Thanks.

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I think I saw a feature in this months CITY magazine on wall alternatives -

had some really cool designs.. one was made of paper (fire resistant) and

is around a foot deep and can be extended up to about 25 feet.. could be

perfect for you loft..

and by the way, i'm jealous.

dig.

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I also remember a few years ago at PS1 during the summer series they had these walls where it was thin strips of wood woven through posts. Cool effect.

Don't know how important sound quality is to you?

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I also remember a few years ago at PS1 during the summer series they had these walls where it was thin strips of wood woven through posts. Cool effect.

Don't know how important sound quality is to you?

--- Original message by lost on Aug 24, 2005 08:52 AM

Thanks for all the help. Sound quality is somewhat important though it doesn't have to be crazy. I do have a girlfriend who sleeps over most nights and we'd like to have some privacy when we sleep. I can post pics of the space if it will help. The unit is not complete yet - it's in an old rocket factory that was completely gutted and rebuilt. Let me know, and thanks for the input. I value all of it.

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sounds like a cool pad...

I would do something focusing on texture...for instance covering an entire wall in sandpaper. Like all different types so it doesn't look too uniform. Or for the real supertalk treatment, buy some raw denim straight from the textile manufacturer, sew it together, and cover your walls with that.

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I also remember a few years ago at PS1 during the summer series they had these walls where it was thin strips of wood woven through posts. Cool effect.

Don't know how important sound quality is to you?

--- Original message by lost on Aug 24, 2005 08:52 AM

Thanks for all the help. Sound quality is somewhat important though it doesn't have to be crazy. I do have a girlfriend who sleeps over most nights and we'd like to have some privacy when we sleep. I can post pics of the space if it will help. The unit is not complete yet - it's in an old rocket factory that was completely gutted and rebuilt. Let me know, and thanks for the input. I value all of it.

--- Original message by so twisted on Aug 24, 2005 09:26 AM

if you mean sound isolation from neighbors by 'sound quality' then you cannot really do anything about that unless you are willing to put up another layer of drywall or something at the very least. It is a common misconception that throwing egg-crate type material on the walls will keep outside noises out and inside noises in. this is just not true.

If by 'quality' you mean reflectivity on the inside of the loft (less echoy) this can be solved with some damping material on the walls, ceiling, and/or floors. It doesn't take much to make a difference. drapes of thick material help. rugs help. anything that is dense and soft.

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You can do sliding partitions or dividers to separate rooms as well. If your handy they're not too hard to make. You can also make a large leaning mirror to cover a large portion of the wall.

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I also remember a few years ago at PS1 during the summer series they had these walls where it was thin strips of wood woven through posts. Cool effect.

Don't know how important sound quality is to you?

--- Original message by lost on Aug 24, 2005 08:52 AM

Thanks for all the help. Sound quality is somewhat important though it doesn't have to be crazy. I do have a girlfriend who sleeps over most nights and we'd like to have some privacy when we sleep. I can post pics of the space if it will help. The unit is not complete yet - it's in an old rocket factory that was completely gutted and rebuilt. Let me know, and thanks for the input. I value all of it.

--- Original message by so twisted on Aug 24, 2005 09:26 AM

if you mean sound isolation from neighbors by 'sound quality' then you cannot really do anything about that unless you are willing to put up another layer of drywall or something at the very least. It is a common misconception that throwing egg-crate type material on the walls will keep outside noises out and inside noises in. this is just not true.

If by 'quality' you mean reflectivity on the inside of the loft (less echoy) this can be solved with some damping material on the walls, ceiling, and/or floors. It doesn't take much to make a difference. drapes of thick material help. rugs help. anything that is dense and soft.

--- Original message by soultek on Aug 24, 2005 12:22 PM

Sorry - didn't really read that all the way through before posting. Sound from the neighbors shouldn't be an issue as: the walls are thick concrete. I really meant privacy within the bedrooms we're going to make.

Acoustics in the loft - not really concerned with.

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oh, so you're building bedrooms inside the loft. That's a little different. First I would recommend putting ceilings on your bedrooms. manytimes people leave the ceilings off in loft bedrooms. Without the ceiling there isn't much you can do.

Use good drywall. That stuff has a rating for how good it will block sound.

also, do not put the drywall on the same frame as the adjoining bedroom. Have two frames that 'float' from each other. The more mechanically coupled the wall is between the living spaces, the less effective the wall will be at blocking sound. A mechanically coupled wall will almost act like a big speaker because it is not super rigid or dense (like your concrete outer walls). this is why double paned windows kick ass. You want two parallel surfaces with space in between and not mechanical coupling between them.

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yo might want to check a magazine called: Wallpaper

lots about interior design, furniture, etc.

-don't hate, appreciate-

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definitely check out Ready Made magazine.

they have a lot of dope ideas for not too much cash in there..

http://www.readymademag.com/

-k

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