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Iron Horse

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Everything posted by Iron Horse

  1. Iron Horse

    Tanuki Japan

    "Just use the plastic bag trick." Peak 2019.
  2. Iron Horse

    Happy Jeans - Tcb 20s contest thread

    I need this in my life. Mmmm...vestbak...
  3. Iron Horse

    Shoes that look better with age...

    Hozho makes some interesting boot bling:
  4. Iron Horse

    Denim Blunders, Reflections and General Nonsense.

    ^^ Also, the chest pockets are chorecoat-sized and too big, and there's a pocket watch pocket but no angled hole in the placket for the pocket watch chain to anchor to. I've been seeing that a lot lately. Not that the vast majority of people are using watch pockets for a pocket watch, but if you're going to do a repro style then go for the gold. Case in point:
  5. Iron Horse

    Denim Blunders, Reflections and General Nonsense.

    Maybe it's to prevent your arm from getting sunburned while driving?
  6. Iron Horse

    Denim Blunders, Reflections and General Nonsense.

    Going for a repro modern thing, are they? Pocket on the right is at the right height for a repro shirt (at or just under the third button), pocket on the right is like most modern shirts.
  7. Iron Horse

    Denim Blunders, Reflections and General Nonsense.

    Dude. Haven't seen one of those since like 1996.
  8. Iron Horse

    Shoes that look better with age...

    This happpened to my RW875s after the stitching started to split. I put some Vaseline in the split areas of the moc and no rain got in again. YMMV though!
  9. Iron Horse

    Denim Blunders, Reflections and General Nonsense.

    Looks like the White Oak Draper looms have a new home:
  10. Iron Horse

    Denim Blunders, Reflections and General Nonsense.

    It's gone by a number of terms, from extension neckband to storm collar, tab collar, and more. At some point in recent history somebody started calling it a "chinstrap" and that stuck, but it it shouldn't go over the chin, just to clarify.
  11. Iron Horse

    Shoes that look better with age...

    Yeah, it’s too bad, they’d match your style well Aries!
  12. Iron Horse

    Shoes that look better with age...

    Speaking of engineers, my new Lofgrens in black CXL.
  13. Iron Horse

    Freewheelers, Bootleggers Reunion, Bubo, etc.

    Now that I look in the mirror, the diaper butt is more pronounced when I’m standing up normally. But I really don’t mind it or hip flare; I just embrace the repro look.
  14. Iron Horse

    Freewheelers, Bootleggers Reunion, Bubo, etc.

    I know you’ve been dying to see my rear in jeans, so here’s what my FW43s look like from the back:
  15. Iron Horse

    Denim Blunders, Reflections and General Nonsense.

    I have a Cushman cigarette pocket shirt where the cig Pocket has been moved up so that the buttons align; it’s not what the original Big Yank shirt was like, but it’s not a bad adjustment: Big Yank cig pocket shirt debut in 1930, before the introduction of the premium Flyer model with ventilation holes and front shoulder yokes: The Flyer:
  16. Iron Horse

    Denim Blunders, Reflections and General Nonsense.

    If it fits! I’d love to make my own version of this, maybe after my next couple of products are out.
  17. Iron Horse

    Denim Blunders, Reflections and General Nonsense.

    The Samurai shirts' pockets are based on ones from a vintage 1930s-40s Uncle Sam cigarette pocket shirt, basically their take on the cig pocket shirt after Big Yank led the way starting in 1930 with their Flyer model. AFAIK, Uncle Sam kept using this pocket style into the '60s: Here you can see how it functions as a pocket-on-pocket design, with the cigarettes meant to go on the top pocket and thus kept away from a sweaty chest:
  18. Iron Horse

    Freewheelers, Bootleggers Reunion, Bubo, etc.

    The 43s look fine to me!
  19. Iron Horse

    Denim Blunders, Reflections and General Nonsense.

    I usually give them a warmish soak. Who knows, maybe people in the store were trying it on.
  20. Iron Horse

    Denim Blunders, Reflections and General Nonsense.

    I bet that would kill it in Denver. Like next-level Zubaz.
  21. Iron Horse

    The Leather Jacket Thread

    A place to discuss leather jackets, finally. I've got a few on my radar, including Rainbow Country's single rider (Sears Hercules repro) in veg tan horsehide: Or High Large Leathers' Guthrie model (Lee Cowboy repro) in horsehide: Or this Sugarcane adjustable collar horsehide half-belt:
  22. Kurt Chen at Faith Co. in Taipei does the closest I've seen to TCB/Sugar Cane factory hemming. Might send him a DM on Instagram.
  23. Iron Horse

    Mister Freedom

    Well, at least the apology is sewn onto the shorts beforehand.
  24. Iron Horse

    Shoes that look better with age...

  25. Iron Horse

    Denim Blunders, Reflections and General Nonsense.

    Pedro, you could likely chime in on this, but from what I gather, for most families wash day was on Monday and lasted until Tuesday or even Wednesday. I've been reading about this lately after taking another look at a second-hand pair of Sugar Cane jeans I got from Japan. The previous owner had obviously washed them in very hot water as the patch was pretty well fried, but also because the weft was so white and the denim/fades had a different look and feel to it, and there was little in the way of damage or blowouts aside from an unraveling hem. Since then I've been washing with soap powder and hot water but also reading more about how laundry was done in the past. Here are some descriptions from the 1930s, for example: https://www.findmypast.com/1939register/the-home-1939-laundry "On a Sunday evening, copper and dolly tubs might be filled with cold water in preparation for wash day. Clothes were sorted and segregated into woollens and cottons and colours and whites. As modern day biological detergents were not available in 1939, exceptionally dirty clothing like overalls would be left to soak overnight with soap flakes added. White shirts and blouses would stand overnight in cold water containing a "blue" whitener. At the start of wash day the electric copper was turned on, or a coal fire was lit under the brick copper to ensure that the water in the tubs was hot enough. A dolly peg, (an item resembling a four or six-legged wooden stool, out of which a wooden "T" piece protruded), would be used to agitate the items that had been soaking overnight. Rotating the dolly peg in this way was a physically demanding and tiring affair. The washing process itself involved lifting the items from the cold soak and wringing or mangling each item before transferring them, with more soap flakes, into the copper for boiling. Items that remained soiled, even after an overnight soak, were rubbed on a scrubbing board before being transferred to the copper. A clothes mangle, a hand operated machine consisting of two rotating rollers (which presented a quite serious potential hazard to anyone not paying attention), would be used to squeeze out all the excess water. Clothes would then be hung out to dry on a clothes line, or laid over a clothes-horse next to the kitchen or living room fire." Would jeans like these have gone through the same process?