ChiTownHustla

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About ChiTownHustla

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  1. Did you go to my yakitori recommendation in Yoyogi-Uehara (Fuku)? What'd ya think?
  2. Nice, I was just in your hood for two weeks in March (was staying at the Sheraton Miyako in Shirokanedai near Meguro). You (or your parents) must be rich haha
  3. How long are you planning on being in Tokyo for? What about Japan? I was there for two weeks a few months back, and bought the Suica+NEX card from Narita for 3000 Yen (which was a great deal, and is for foreigners only). I also bought a JR unlimited ride 7-day rail pass before I got to Japan (these are only available outside Japan, check JR's website for details). I activated this pass during my last 7 days in Japan...I basically used it to travel from Tokyo to Osaka/Kyoto/Hiroshima/Himeji/back to Tokyo/and back to Narita. It'll run you $300, but it was definitely worth it in my case. It works on all JR lines, which includes the Narita Express, as well as the entire Yamanote Line (train that makes a giant loop around Tokyo). For food reviews, I used to use www.bento.com a lot...just about everything we tried that was highly recommended (had a star) was amazing. There is an english language website that has point to point subway directions, but I can't remember the name of it right now.
  4. Weird question, but are you a dude or a chick? lol Your avatar pic is a chick, but you sound like a dude. :confused:
  5. I bought a very very detailed dual language map of Tokyo before my 2-week trip there, but honestly I didn't use it much at all. What I did use was my iPhone. Relying on finding an open wifi network is frustrating, and I could never find one when I needed it, so I just ended up get some data on my iPhone. I would get like 20MB at a time and would only use it for Google Maps (don't waste data on Safari, email, any other apps). The iPhone was really useful for find subway stations, stores, and which direction I was walking with using the compass. It wasn't really that expensive either. I think 20MB lasted me almost a week and cost $30 or so (don't quote me on the price, I don't remember exactly, but it wasn't too bad at all). My iPhone is locked with AT&T, so I'm not sure if international data rates are more with other carriers. EDIT: Here's a link from AT&T's website. Spending $59.99 on 50 MB of data might be the best value you get for spending only $60 in Japan. If you only use maps, the 50MB should last you your entire trip. I always used to check for wifi before launching maps, just in case I could avoid using data. I'd say I found an unlocked wifi network about 5% of the time, so it's worth checking first. http://www.wireless.att.com/learn/international/roaming/iphone-travel-tips.jsp Consider Purchasing an International Data Package: If you are traveling outside the U.S., purchasing a Data Global Plan will significantly reduce the cost of using data abroad. To add an international data package call 1-800-331-0500. $24.99/month: 20 MB Data Global Add-On gives you 20 MB of usage within more than 90 countries $59.99/month: 50 MB Data Global Add-On gives you 50 MB of usage within more than 90 countries $119.99/month: 100 MB Data Global Add-On gives you 100 MB of usage within more than 90 countries $199.99/month: 200 MB Data Global Add-On gives you 200 MB of usage within more than 90 countries
  6. Born and raised in Houston. Magnolia is a nice hotel downtown. As far as food goes, I'd say it's the most worthwhile thing for tourists to do. Houston isn't a tourist town, and I wouldn't waste your time going to NASA (far north and really boring), or even Galveston (beach). IMO Houston is the definitely a top restaurant city in America. Try Goode Company for BBQ (it's near Rice Univ), and Lupe Tortilla for beef fajitas. Chicken & waffles at the Breakfast Klub for brunch downtown. Go to Ruggles Bakery for their white chocolate bread pudding...it's very legit. Shopping in Houston mainly revolves around the Galleria (as far as malls go, it's probably the best shopping mall in America). Houston doesn't have a downtown outdoor shopping street (ie: 5th Ave, Michigan Ave, etc), so the Galleria is pretty much our version of that. If you're into sneakers, check out Premium Goods (it's really close to Goode Company BBQ, so you can hit up one after the other). There's also A-Front on Washington Ave. None of the other sneaker stores in Houston are even worth checking out IMO. And yes, you definitely need to rent a car (think Los Angles, but somehow even more spread out).
  7. Yep, with autofocus. Here's a link: http://www.abesofmaine.com/item.do?item=CN5018&id=CN5018&l=FROOGLE
  8. While it's true that kit lenses aren't the greatest, I still think they're worth getting if you're new to SLR photography. Reason being, it's a pretty low-cost zoom lens, and nice to have in your collection. I also purchased a 50mm f/1.8 lens for just $100. It's Canon's best value by far...just about everyone SLR shooter has this one in their collection. I just wish I had this camera when I was in Japan in March...
  9. Funny you say that, cause when I made that statement, I was specifically thinking of Indian food in my head. IMO, the Indian food in Austin is some of the worst in the country, even for a city its size. Clay Pit is pure garbage. Shalimar is even worse. You're right about Vietnamese though, I have had some good pho on the north side.
  10. Sweet vid! The 5DMKII is definitely a sick camera, but in terms of video quality, the new Canon T2i/550D is just as good. I just copped it for $899 with the kit lens and am loving it so far. I'm still an amateur (as you'll see), but here's the first video I shot with it: http://www.vimeo.com/11096005
  11. I'm original from Houston, and spent 4 years in Austin for undergrad at UT. Austin does have a lot going for it, but I honestly think it's slightly overrated (great for college though, I just wouldn't want to live there right out of college). People from Houston love to say how Austin is "dry heat" compared to Houston, but IMO that's BS...both cities are godawfully humid in the summertime. Great good if you like texmex, BBQ, and brunch. Not much at all in terms of authentic international cuisine. Sure there are so bougie ethnic eateries, but nothing like you'd find in NY, Chicago, LA, Houston, etc. Not very racially diverse either. Apart from the university population...Austin is predominantly white and Mexican.
  12. Just copped...new for $440 (no tax, no shipping).
  13. I had yakitori and plenty of other places, and Fuku was BY FAR the best. I, too, thought it was hard to mess up grilled chicken, but this stuff is out of this world. I never knew chicken could taste that good. Don't want to hype it more than I already have, but definitely check it out and report back...
  14. This might be the best recommendation I've given anyone about Tokyo. If you're looking for Yakitori, you HAVE to go to Fuku. Quite possibly the best value in Tokyo. It's away from the hustle and bustle, but still really close to Shibuya (near the Yoyogi-Uehara train stop). The building is unmarked from the outside, but just look at the map and ask around when you're close if you can't find it. I think we ended up spending not even $30 a person and left stuffed (I actually ended up going again on my last night in Tokyo). Note: They are closed on Wednesdays. It's also a pretty small restaurant, so you might want to have your hotel concierge call ahead for a reservation. Here's a link: http://www.bento.com/rev/2420.html
  15. Not a photo, but I did just get this new DSLR (Canon T2i)...here's my first attempt at 1080p video: http://vimeo.com/11096005