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Found 8 results

  1. superfuture

    evoque + drgitlin

    01 | superfuture started in 1999. how old were you then? [drg] 23 and still living in London. [evoque] 21 and in an undisclosed location. 02 | how did you first discover sufu? [drg] I have a feeling Elle sent me there when I was on the search for proper denim, some time around 2005. By this point we were living in Lexington, KY, which at that time was quite the dead zone when it came to things like selvedge, tier 0, or anything else that might get the nerd or otaku a-twitching. [evoque] It was so long ago that I can't accurately remember. 03 | there are plenty of shopping experts on supertalk. what's your specialty? are you a pro? [drg] I've been around a while at this point, and you pick some stuff up. Some time early on in the retail trenches with Diesel in the mid-90s taught me a lot about denim. (Protip: wash your jeans, it adds patina and no one likes the smelly kid!) I used to rock a lot of Stüssy, Futura Labs and Maharishi, although for the past few years its been a near-constant diet of Veilance and Acronym. [evoque] By necessity, I've had to be a specialist in women's techwear and sneakers, but I also have a fondness for designer handbags and shoes, as well as for architecturally interesting womenswear by designers like Sharon Wauchob, Maria Pinto, and of course Rei Kawakubo and Junya Watanabe. 04 | reputation is everything in an online community. how's yours going? do you ever get neg repped? [drg] Not sure; too old to care these days. [evoque] Can't let the haters get you down, right? 05 | online forums are all about the members, threads and posts. who and what keeps you addicted? [drg] The Acronym and Veilance threads, mostly. [evoque] WAYWT, the bag thread, and the Acronym and Veilance threads, naturally. 06 | supertalkers are based all over the planet. have you met any IRL? [drg] A couple here and there. [evoque] Reader, I married him. 07 | are you fast and furious / slow chilled and controlled / or bitter and twisted? [drg] Depends on the time of day. [evoque] I contain multitudes. 08 | the internet is full of crap. with over 3.2 million posts since 2003 has supertalk been a credible contributor or a major culprit? [drg] On the one hand there's plenty of knowledge out there now as a result. On the other, kids use words like "jawns" which I don't even understand. So perhaps, as someone once said with regards to the US experiment with democracy, "it's too soon to tell." [evoque] As a time capsule into its particular intersection of fashion and culture, supertalk's definitely going to be a treasure trove for future Internet historians. 09 | if supertalk got accidentally deleted would you be devastated or relieved? [drg] I'd be upset. [evoque] Though there are more outlets focused on women's techwear and sneakers nowadays, I'd still be devastated to lose a familiar hangout. 10 | if you could nominate another superstar who would it be? [drg] @TaoSpace [evoque] By unanimous decision, @TaoSpace @evoque @drgitlin photo credit @sophiesahara on instagram
  2. superfuture

    evoque + drgitlin

    01 | superfuture started in 1999. how old were you then? [drg] 23 and still living in London. [evoque] 21 and in an undisclosed location. 02 | how did you first discover sufu? [drg] I have a feeling Elle sent me there when I was on the search for proper denim, some time around 2005. By this point we were living in Lexington, KY, which at that time was quite the dead zone when it came to things like selvedge, tier 0, or anything else that might get the nerd or otaku a-twitching. [evoque] It was so long ago that I can't accurately remember. 03 | there are plenty of shopping experts on supertalk. what's your specialty? are you a pro? [drg] I've been around a while at this point, and you pick some stuff up. Some time early on in the retail trenches with Diesel in the mid-90s taught me a lot about denim. (Protip: wash your jeans, it adds patina and no one likes the smelly kid!) I used to rock a lot of Stüssy, Futura Labs and Maharishi, although for the past few years its been a near-constant diet of Veilance and Acronym. [evoque] By necessity, I've had to be a specialist in women's techwear and sneakers, but I also have a fondness for designer handbags and shoes, as well as for architecturally interesting womenswear by designers like Sharon Wauchob, Maria Pinto, and of course Rei Kawakubo and Junya Watanabe. 04 | reputation is everything in an online community. how's yours going? do you ever get neg repped? [drg] Not sure; too old to care these days. [evoque] Can't let the haters get you down, right? 05 | online forums are all about the members, threads and posts. who and what keeps you addicted? [drg] The Acronym and Veilance threads, mostly. [evoque] WAYWT, the bag thread, and the Acronym and Veilance threads, naturally. 06 | supertalkers are based all over the planet. have you met any IRL? [drg] A couple here and there. [evoque] Reader, I married him. 07 | are you fast and furious / slow chilled and controlled / or bitter and twisted? [drg] Depends on the time of day. [evoque] I contain multitudes. 08 | the internet is full of crap. with over 3.2 million posts since 2003 has supertalk been a credible contributor or a major culprit? [drg] On the one hand there's plenty of knowledge out there now as a result. On the other, kids use words like "jawns" which I don't even understand. So perhaps, as someone once said with regards to the US experiment with democracy, "it's too soon to tell." [evoque] As a time capsule into its particular intersection of fashion and culture, supertalk's definitely going to be a treasure trove for future Internet historians. 09 | if supertalk got accidentally deleted would you be devastated or relieved? [drg] I'd be upset. [evoque] Though there are more outlets focused on women's techwear and sneakers nowadays, I'd still be devastated to lose a familiar hangout. 10 | if you could nominate another superstar who would it be? [drg] @TaoSpace [evoque] By unanimous decision, @TaoSpace @evoque @drgitlin photo credit @sophiesahara on instagram View full record
  3. superfuture

    TEKsevenZERO

    01 | superfuture started in 1999. how old were you then? I was 29, old enough to know better! 02 | how did you first discover sufu? I think I was looking for info on denim jeans, and quite surprised to find a whole community of jean nerds with an obsession like mine, so there are more poor souls out there fascinated with left hand versus right hand twill and ‘atari’ etc. I live now predominantly in the supertechwear section 03 | there are plenty of shopping experts on supertalk. what's your specialty? are you a pro? Def no, I have a bit of a mantra that I wait for sale time and if I do not manage to get what I want at a good less than retail price, then it was not meant to be. I don’t care what anyone says on here but there is very little indeed in the way of clothing that is actually worth the RRP let alone the crazy stupid prices some are prepared to spend on in the aftermarket. I am not the normal SUFU size either so that puts me right on the outer edge of anything fitting and the whole sizing thing really gets my goat, if manufacturers, labels brands etc simply displayed in inches, or cm the actual size then we’d stand a decent chance of getting the fit right! Plus I no longer have the disposable income as I used to, so that makes me very selective these days. 04 | reputation is everything in an online community. how's yours going? do you ever get neg repped? I’m not sure how one quantifies 'good rep’ and really does not matter to me at all, I feel I should get neg rep sometime for being a black sheep sometimes and sarcasm doesn’t translate too well on the interwebs, folk really can at times (ok, alot of the time) take themselves waaaay too serious on here. 05 | online forums are all about the members, threads and posts. who and what keeps you addicted? It’s very interesting to find a disparate bunch of individuals that share a common interest and seeing how they express that is rather intriguing, however there has been a surge in the uptake of the whole techwear ‘fashion’ that has brought in a slew of folk who obviously devour the culture like fast food, it’s apparent from the questions and comments that they have not had the patience and dare I say, etiquette to read up the couple of hundred pages of a thread, there’s alot of good reading and info in there. I don’t know if I’ve actually contributed any where near enough as I should, but I try to be down to earth. It's the progressive nature of the supertechwear that brings me back, to see innovation in the way textiles and technology merge and take from the past and move into the future then trickle down into the everyday is great. I try to sometimes give an alternative view or angle as I find it all too easy for some people to buy a whole outfit by the same brand and throw it on like a catalogue image, that's way too easy and, um boring in my view. I like to throw something dirt cheap and non-desirable on with other more favoured articles, but I do have to say I have no real brand allegiance. As far as I'm concerned if it looks good I'll buy it regardless of price, status or reputation. I have no issues with wearing a pair of ACRNM pants with a £2.50 supermarket branded tee! I'm not keen on brand snobbishness. After all, inspiration – especially in the techwear realm, derives from work & military surplus doesn't it? Fashion and style can be two very different things despite the incestuous relationship they have, when all is said and done when is a pair of denim jeans and a white tee not going to still look good. Timeless classic. 06 | supertalkers are based all over the planet. have you met any IRL? I haven’t but really should, there are some great folk I’ve met virtually and I ought to pop over to CZ and say hello to a couple of the headz there! - Also a quick train journey to London for a cuppa with the ACR crew there and if I’m ever in DC then there’s an expat there who it’d be great to have a chinwag with and maybe have a spin in a Veyron 07 | are you fast and furious / slow chilled and controlled / or bitter and twisted? Oh I can be all of those and none, I aspire desperately to be slow, chilled and controlled but only really feel that way when I return to Sweden and am among the lakes and trees, far from the madding crowd. 08 | the internet is full of crap. with over 3.2 million posts since 2003 has supertalk been a credible contributor or a major culprit? It’s not just the internet that full of it, just switch in the news! - ummm…I think supertalk can be quite cathartic, and guilty of both, I seriously think that it encourages a voracious consumptive nature that I find irksome, to the end that I am trying to shed most of my stuff to declutter, but it is also an absolute goldmine of really good info and some really inspirational autodidactic artisans, you know who you are. I know I'm full of crap sometimes! 09 | if supertalk got accidentally deleted would you be devastated or relieved? I’d be devastated to lose the contact aspect but I also loved the days when the culture of clothing was a fully lived in part of life, rather than an adopted thing because it is the latest fad promoted by some famous for 15 minutes pop culture idol. It’s a nice place to decompress. My history is that of old school hip hop so that is where it started proper for me back in the early 80’s, but that came out after the rise of the casual scene while at school, the whole terrace culture that was all word of mouth, sheesh, I remember when I first saw a girl wear trainers (sneakers) and you knew there and then that there was a tectonic shfting, history was being made, but I digress... 10 | if you could nominate another superstar who would it be? I'd live to hear from the double act of DrGitlin and his wife evoque, it'd be great to have a lady's view on things. @TEKsevenZERO
  4. superfuture

    TEKsevenZERO

    01 | superfuture started in 1999. how old were you then? I was 29, old enough to know better! 02 | how did you first discover sufu? I think I was looking for info on denim jeans, and quite surprised to find a whole community of jean nerds with an obsession like mine, so there are more poor souls out there fascinated with left hand versus right hand twill and ‘atari’ etc. I live now predominantly in the supertechwear section 03 | there are plenty of shopping experts on supertalk. what's your specialty? are you a pro? Def no, I have a bit of a mantra that I wait for sale time and if I do not manage to get what I want at a good less than retail price, then it was not meant to be. I don’t care what anyone says on here but there is very little indeed in the way of clothing that is actually worth the RRP let alone the crazy stupid prices some are prepared to spend on in the aftermarket. I am not the normal SUFU size either so that puts me right on the outer edge of anything fitting and the whole sizing thing really gets my goat, if manufacturers, labels brands etc simply displayed in inches, or cm the actual size then we’d stand a decent chance of getting the fit right! Plus I no longer have the disposable income as I used to, so that makes me very selective these days. 04 | reputation is everything in an online community. how's yours going? do you ever get neg repped? I’m not sure how one quantifies 'good rep’ and really does not matter to me at all, I feel I should get neg rep sometime for being a black sheep sometimes and sarcasm doesn’t translate too well on the interwebs, folk really can at times (ok, alot of the time) take themselves waaaay too serious on here. 05 | online forums are all about the members, threads and posts. who and what keeps you addicted? It’s very interesting to find a disparate bunch of individuals that share a common interest and seeing how they express that is rather intriguing, however there has been a surge in the uptake of the whole techwear ‘fashion’ that has brought in a slew of folk who obviously devour the culture like fast food, it’s apparent from the questions and comments that they have not had the patience and dare I say, etiquette to read up the couple of hundred pages of a thread, there’s alot of good reading and info in there. I don’t know if I’ve actually contributed any where near enough as I should, but I try to be down to earth. It's the progressive nature of the supertechwear that brings me back, to see innovation in the way textiles and technology merge and take from the past and move into the future then trickle down into the everyday is great. I try to sometimes give an alternative view or angle as I find it all too easy for some people to buy a whole outfit by the same brand and throw it on like a catalogue image, that's way too easy and, um boring in my view. I like to throw something dirt cheap and non-desirable on with other more favoured articles, but I do have to say I have no real brand allegiance. As far as I'm concerned if it looks good I'll buy it regardless of price, status or reputation. I have no issues with wearing a pair of ACRNM pants with a £2.50 supermarket branded tee! I'm not keen on brand snobbishness. After all, inspiration – especially in the techwear realm, derives from work & military surplus doesn't it? Fashion and style can be two very different things despite the incestuous relationship they have, when all is said and done when is a pair of denim jeans and a white tee not going to still look good. Timeless classic. 06 | supertalkers are based all over the planet. have you met any IRL? I haven’t but really should, there are some great folk I’ve met virtually and I ought to pop over to CZ and say hello to a couple of the headz there! - Also a quick train journey to London for a cuppa with the ACR crew there and if I’m ever in DC then there’s an expat there who it’d be great to have a chinwag with and maybe have a spin in a Veyron 07 | are you fast and furious / slow chilled and controlled / or bitter and twisted? Oh I can be all of those and none, I aspire desperately to be slow, chilled and controlled but only really feel that way when I return to Sweden and am among the lakes and trees, far from the madding crowd. 08 | the internet is full of crap. with over 3.2 million posts since 2003 has supertalk been a credible contributor or a major culprit? It’s not just the internet that full of it, just switch in the news! - ummm…I think supertalk can be quite cathartic, and guilty of both, I seriously think that it encourages a voracious consumptive nature that I find irksome, to the end that I am trying to shed most of my stuff to declutter, but it is also an absolute goldmine of really good info and some really inspirational autodidactic artisans, you know who you are. I know I'm full of crap sometimes! 09 | if supertalk got accidentally deleted would you be devastated or relieved? I’d be devastated to lose the contact aspect but I also loved the days when the culture of clothing was a fully lived in part of life, rather than an adopted thing because it is the latest fad promoted by some famous for 15 minutes pop culture idol. It’s a nice place to decompress. My history is that of old school hip hop so that is where it started proper for me back in the early 80’s, but that came out after the rise of the casual scene while at school, the whole terrace culture that was all word of mouth, sheesh, I remember when I first saw a girl wear trainers (sneakers) and you knew there and then that there was a tectonic shfting, history was being made, but I digress... 10 | if you could nominate another superstar who would it be? I'd live to hear from the double act of DrGitlin and his wife evoque, it'd be great to have a lady's view on things. @TEKsevenZERO View full record
  5. superfuture

    max power

    01 | superfuture started in 1999. how old were you then? I was 15 back then. 02 | how did you first discover sufu? In 2007 or 2008 I first read about Nudie Jeans and it was the gateway drug into raw denim. In 2009 I joined the mynudies forum but learned very quick that there's better denim out there as well as a better forum where it is discussed. I was lurking a few months before joining as I was a bit intimidated by the experienced users there. superfuture and mynudies user Beautiful_freak was a great promoter of SuFu, so I decided to join in October 2010 by sharing some of my faded jeans and pictures of Levi Strauss' birthplace. 03 | there are plenty of shopping experts on supertalk. what's your specialty? are you a pro? I am by no means an expert, but know a thing or two about denim (especially Samurai and Iron Heart) and shoes/boots. I know a lot about fading jeans however, it's what got me hooked back then and still is most entertaining, to see how a fabric evolves over time and share it with fellow people. I can also give sizing and washing advice and know some cuts, so I always like to give advice to new members. My other interests are records, whisky and tattoos. I think I would rather think of me as an expert in these subjects, but besides the tattoos thread in superculture I don't share them here. 04 | reputation is everything in an online community. how's yours going? do you ever get neg repped? I can't complain, there's some very friendly users that give positive reputation, mainly for my faded jeans. I am not a very stylish person so most rep comes for fades or WAYJDT (What are your jeans doing today)-posts. And I got a few points through the old rep system. 05 | online forums are all about the members, threads and posts. who and what keeps you addicted? There's always a period when my interests shift towards my other interests, but the community always keeps me coming back. There's a core of enthusiasts that are passionate about their gear which makes it fun to come back every now and then to keep in touch. Also there are many great contests and world tours happening, I also like to read older threads with this content. The OOE Yofukuten world tour being the finest so far, in my opinion. Besides that, I think that the denim blunders thread is often very entertaining, reaching political dimensions sometimes just to come back to very profane matters. 06 | supertalkers are based all over the planet. have you met any IRL? I have met a few indeed, and all were great guys. Beautiful_freak, Volvo240thebest, Atzec, Almostnice, Kayodic and Blue Nemo come to my mind immediately, but I think there were more (also from other forums). It was always a good time and a good opportunity to be nerdy. 07 | are you fast and furious / slow chilled and controlled / or bitter and twisted? Sometimes bitter, but I think online I'm pretty chilled. 08 | the internet is full of crap. with over 3.2 million posts since 2003 has supertalk been a credible contributor or a major culprit? Most of it is super useful information and there are very well informed regulars here. 09 | if supertalk got accidentally deleted would you be devastated or relieved? You often need to lose something to fully understand its value... so I'm certain I would be devastated a while as this place has played a part in my life for almost 7 years now. 10 | if you could nominate another superstar who would it be? It has to be Maynard Friedman, we need to know more about this guy. Beautiful_Freak is a close second as he's a super active user for many years. Max Power
  6. superfuture

    volvo240thebest

    01 | superfuture started in 1999. how old were you then? Back then I was 19. 02 | how did you first discover sufu? I think I'd discovered sufu around 2010. I started to wear raw denim in 2009, and I think I found sufu because of some internet searches related on "how often should I wash my jeans". I'd been a lurker for a couple years at least and I've been an active member since 2012 I think. I only hang around the superdenim sub forum. 03 | there are plenty of shopping experts on supertalk. what's your specialty? are you a pro? I am not a pro! Just an average guy who likes to wear his denim. I am a musician and I work as well in music management. I play traditional and early music on wooden flutes and I work as director of a chamber music festival in Italy. My specialty would probably be everything involved with Japanese brand TCB. TCB is a small factory brand from Kurashiki in Okayama prefecture of Japan. They're specialized on reproduction of workwear from the 1920's to the 1960's. I bought my first pair of TCB jeans in 2012, just a couple of months after the brand was created. I believe I've been one of their first overseas customers. Since then I've become quite a fan of the brand and also a friend of the founder of TCB Hajime Inoue. Through my enthusiasm and sharing evolution pics of all my TCB jeans and jackets I think I've helped the brand to spread a bit outside of Japan. 04 | reputation is everything in an online community. how's yours going? do you ever get neg repped? I don't care much about reputation. I do care about good manners and I see the rep system as a tool to keep the people well behaved on forums. 05 | online forums are all about the members, threads and posts. who and what keeps you addicted? Raw denim, vintage style inspired by 1920's to 1960's, Japanese vintage inspired brands, leathercraft, fine boots. I like to see how clothes are worn, and I appreciate people who put together a well thought outfit, not necessarily composed by a bunch of expensive and exclusive clothes only. I also love vintage cars, especially Volvos (hence my nickname), photography, tattoos, and music of course, though the music I listen to won't appeal to the 95% of the sufu crowd, being mostly hardcore, pure drop traditional music, early music and classical music. 06 | supertalkers are based all over the planet. have you met any IRL? I come from Italy, where the raw denim community is really small. Only a couple of my real life friends know and wear selvedge jeans, and none of them live in my area. There are only a few Italian regular posters on sufu, but I've never met any of them. I did meet a couple posters outside of my country on various tours. One of them has become a good friend IRL as well. 07 | are you fast and furious / slow chilled and controlled / or bitter and twisted? Definitely slow, chilled and controlled. 08 | the internet is full of crap. with over 3.2 million posts since 2003 has supertalk been a credible contributor or a major culprit? The supertalk community is big, there are some knowledgeable people and some wankers as well hanging around here. 50/50? 60/40?!? 09 | if supertalk got accidentally deleted would you be devastated or relieved? Neither probably. Let's say I would be devastated and my bank account would be relieved! 10 | if you could nominate another superstar who would it be? Another simple guy who likes to wear his denim well and hard, Max Power. volvo240thebest
  7. superfuture

    danii

    01 | superfuture started in 1999. how old were you then? In 99 I was 18, I wore black oversized BDUs and black hoody most of the time, spending time with my skate crew and listening to french rap. 02 | how did you first discover sufu? When I first dicovered sufu, the website was not accepting any new users so I had to wait some time to get my login credentials. Even when I grind the supertechwear all the time, the thing that brought me here was one of the early denim world tours. 03 | there are plenty of shopping experts on supertalk. what's your specialty? are you a pro? Not an expert at all, I miss a lot of times and have to go through a return process quite often. 04 | reputation is everything in an online community. how's yours going? do you ever get neg repped? Reputation is everything! I think I am going pretty good, but note that I post in supertechwear exclusively, I bet I will get more negreps if I posted in the main WAYWT or some other topics I do not even understand what they are about. 05 | online forums are all about the members, threads and posts. who and what keeps you addicted? Even when people are creating discord, facebook, skype, whatsapp groups, superfuture will always be the best place to discuss techwear. Most people participating in the new media are noobs who just jumped on the trend and have zero authenticity and knowledge. 06 | supertalkers are based all over the planet. have you met any IRL? I met Polaris, supertalkers are rare in Czech republic. I know there are others but since we share interest we met. So shout out to sufuers in here/visiting Prague, let me know if you want to meet fellow deckers. 07 | are you fast and furious / slow chilled and controlled / or bitter and twisted? fast and controlled and twisted 08 | the internet is full of crap. with over 3.2 million posts since 2003 has supertalk been a credible contributor or a major culprit? As I mentioned earlier there are some OG posts I do not understand at all, but overall there is less shitpost than on the new media. I like to check all the conversation in topics I follow and with sufu it's doable, compared to the new media. 09 | if supertalk got accidentally deleted would you be devastated or relieved? Hard to tell. I'd like to think I would be neutral about it, but I met some good online buddies here, had fun, gained knowledge and build my reputation empire. It would be a huge loss. WTB: superfuture x loopwheeler t-shirt (L/XL) so I have a souvenir. 10 | if you could nominate another superstar who would it be? TEKsevenZERO Danii published 29/05/2017
  8. Demna Gvasalia Reveals Vetements' Plan to Disrupt the Fashion System In an exclusive interview, Demna Gvasalia, head of the Vetements collective and newly appointed artistic director of Balenciaga, talks to Imran Amed about a new operating model designed to fix the ‘broken’ fashion system. BY IMRAN AMED FEBRUARY 5, 2016 18:10 PARIS, France — Up until now, much of the attention on Vetements, the design collective led by Demna Gvasalia, has focused on the creative earthquake the brand orchestrated in Paris over the past few seasons, with a product-focused approach rooted in digital culture and a raw, unpolished aesthetic, and buzzy fashion shows held at Le Depot, a famous sex club, and Le Président, an off-piste Chinese restaurant. But Gvasalia, together with his brother Guram who acts as chief executive, is not stopping at creative provocation alone. Starting this year, they plan to roll out a completely different operating model designed to streamline the production cycle, take advantage of pre-collection timing and elevate the creative output of their fledgling label. Here, we learn how and why they think it is going to work. Imran Amed: How did you first get interested in fashion? Demna Gvasalia: Well, I grew up in Soviet times in Georgia, which meant that me and my friends, we all had the same clothes. It was such a unified society that was deprived of information and of many things, which probably pushed me from early on to discover certain excitement in things that I didn’t know. Then we had the civil war in Georgia, where we had to leave the place where I grew up. We had this gypsy lifestyle for around 7 years, finally moving to Germany. So, I really had to adapt to a lot of situations and people within a short period of time, to be adaptable, to know how to integrate. I really wanted to study fashion at the time — it was my ideal, but in Georgia people didn’t really believe fashion was a profession, and especially, it was not a profession for a guy to study. It was some weird, capricious thing for rich kids and was not considered a job. I moved to Düsseldorf because my family moved there, and studied International Economics in Georgia. I was supposed to start working at a bank in Germany but that prospect was so depressing. I realised that I would be the most unhappy person in the world. So, I went to Antwerp to try and enter the Academy there. I didn’t really know much about it and the whole Belgian avant-garde that had happened. I went literally because it was the only school I could afford. At the time it was 500 or 600 euros a year, I think because it was a state-owned school. That’s how I got to Belgium and studied fashion. IA: But it sounds like you were interested in fashion from the beginning. DG: I was interested in fashion, I just didn’t know much. Some people came to Antwerp and knew everything. At the entrance exam, one of the panel asked me who I knew from the Belgian generation of fashion designers and I just said Dries van Noten because that was the only name I actually knew and could pronounce. The person who asked me that was Walter van Beirendonck, who was part of the Antwerp Six. To me, he was just a weird guy with a beard and rings. He ended up being one of my teachers and I actually worked with Walter after I finished at the Academy. IA: How did your training at the Academy shape you as a designer? DG: In many ways, we had to learn things about ourselves to discover our own aesthetic and what we liked. They try to push creativity — it’s not a very technical school. No one really explains how to construct a tailored jacket, you have to find out about that yourself, which is a hard process but it absolutely pays off. By discovering it on your own, you actually learn a lot more about it than if someone explains to you how to do it. So that was a blessing in disguise. There was a lot of influence from this whole Belgian aesthetic: and the deconstruction, and Margiela and Dries. I mean we studied works and the names and methods of work that we heard about every day. So naturally it had an impact on me. But I cannot say that during these four years that I actually found my aesthetic — I don’t think so. I think I really started to understand what I liked and what I didn’t like afterwards, when I actually started working in fashion. IA: What did you work on with Walter? DG: When I worked with him, it was on menswear, but at one point I just realised it was a bit limited for me. I decided to do something for womenswear and I applied for jobs etcetera. One of the options I had was Margiela, so they called me and I moved to Paris to do womenswear for the first time. IA: What was it like to work in that mythical place? DG: It was exceptional. That period of my life was probably the most formative in terms of fashion. My real studies, where I learned about clothes, was working at Margiela, especially in this kind of transitional period after Martin left; when the company was trying to modernise its DNA and find ways to continue its history. For me it was like an MA in fashion. When you’re a student at a fashion academy, it’s all really theoretical. Here it was real, it was something that people made — that people wore. The most amazing thing was actually discovering the archives and looking at how the pieces were made and learning the way that the clothes were designed. I saw the pieces that were done at the beginning of Margiela at the beginning of the 1990s. It was investigative fashion. They took a shirt, they took it apart, and they made a new one out of it. This whole idea about understanding the core of what you are doing, to make something new. They needed to take a shirt apart to make a new shirt. They didn’t come up with a new garment that didn’t exist. It became a method of working for me. You really needed to understand the construction of the garment and to kind-of be in love with it in order to make something out of it. That’s something I learned there. IA: Why is that important to you? DG: A garment is a product. It’s not made to be in a museum. It’s meant to be in somebody’s wardrobe. But then again, you need to like what you do. You don’t just need to like your job, but you need to like the product. I don’t want to compare it to an artist working on an artwork — but it’s the same. You are kind of subconsciously in love with what you do, and I think as I am working on a hoodie, I love to work on that hoodie. That’s what enhances your ideas and your creativity. IA: After three and half years at Margiela, you decided to leave. Why? DG: It was so intense; this challenge and possibility of actually being there and learning there, but it was too much. At one point I realised, either I am going to stay there for the rest of my life like some people do, or I’m going to discover other parts of fashion that I didn’t know. Margiela is a very specific company with a very different way of working. It’s not a classical model like the old houses. I wanted to see the other side, the more corporate side and the luxury product, because Margiela, for me, wasn’t really a luxury product, it was more investigative fashion rather than about the product itself. That’s when I had an opportunity to go to Vuitton, which was a complete contrast. I did two collections with Marc Jacobs, from the moment I arrived, and then I did two collections with Nicolas Ghesquière. It was good timing because I could work with Marc and see his way of working and then work with Nicolas, which was very different. IA: How would you compare their ways of working and what did you learn from those designers? DG: Vuitton is such a big company and there are so many possibilities — technical possibilities. A huge atelier and everything. The sky is basically the limit of what you could do. Working with Marc was very different and a lot of fun. His way of working is about fun. Making a collection, but not doing it for six months. He would make the collection two or three weeks before the show. It was a very spontaneous way of making fashion. Nicolas was a perfectionist. It was about working in detail. We could fit the same jacket 20 times before getting the perfect one he wanted to have. That was a very different approach and it was important for me to see and understand, to take elements from all those things and re-appropriate them, and to build up my own methodology. IA: That’s a pretty fortunate set of circumstances there, working with those designers, in those houses. DG: I must say that I was really lucky to work with all the people I worked with. I learned an immense amount and different ways of doing things. I mean Marc, and Nicolas, and Margiela — and before that Walter. There were so many different things to learn. At one point I realised I wanted to be in a position to develop something on my own and to really have my own creative expression somewhere, and that’s when the Vetements idea was born. IA: Let’s talk about that moment, when Vetements was first seeded. DG: It was conceived basically between me and a couple of my friends. We would meet and share our opinions about the industry and what was going on, and what we agreed on and didn’t agree on. The pre-collection, the collection, all the things that we had to do. We thought the same way and shared [something] aesthetically as well, so we thought, why don’t we put something together in our spare time? I could have continued doing that job for another 20 years. It was quite a fortunate position to be in, but I felt like it wasn’t enough. There was something else I wanted to do. It was not to do something commercial at all. It was really just to not get creatively frustrated and to do something we liked aesthetically. It was not supposed to be a concept or a statement, but really to make clothes, not for ourselves but for girls that we projected on that we liked, and for our friends. We started doing it on the weekends, at night, after work — just as a fun project. My brother Guram knew that we were working on this. At one point, he thought there was definitely a market for this so we should try to sell it. It was really his initiative to commercialise it, make a showroom, invite buyers, etcetera. This is how it all started in my bedroom. IA: I have rarely seen a brand gather as much momentum in such a short time. Why do you think that happened? DG: Well, I think the way we work is very intuitive. We don’t force things. We always work on one garment at a time, and for example, if we spend more than 20 minutes on it, we just cancel it because it doesn’t feel right. On the other hand, I think I am quite fortunate to have Guram working on the business. The way he does market research is very different because its very closely linked to the creative process and what we do. He would never come to me and say, “We need to do that because that’s what the market asks for.†He will do his utmost to sell what we believe in as a brand, what we create. If next season we do a capsule, I know he will be behind it and try to sell it to the client. IA: You expressed a shared sense of frustration with the industry among the wider Vetements team. What types of things were you talking about? DG: Well, basically the frustration was with the cycle. The creative cycle that didn’t really coincide at all with the production side, and the demands and the number of pieces that we had to make. The pieces became kind of soulless, you know, because they had to be made, but didn’t really have a reason to be. That was the most frustrating part for me. You need to have a jersey top because that’s what the market requests — I can’t do a jersey top at that very moment, you know? Our idea was to make things that we really felt confident about and wanted to see people wear. I wasn’t doing that in any of my previous professional experiences. IA: What do you mean? DG: At Margiela, of course, it was all very conceptual and had to be a very different concept every six months. It was about a certain statement. At Vuitton, it was about the product and clothes that were meant to be worn, but it was not necessarily clothes that I wanted to see people wear. My idea from the beginning in fashion is that it is about the product and it’s about the clothes that people need to be wearing. That’s the biggest compliment for a designer, to see people wearing your clothes, not to be in a fashion book. I didn’t really feel satisfied at that time with what I was doing. IA: How much of that, do you think, came from needing to say something of your own? DG: A lot of it came from that, and because I realised we could do something on our own and it would be saying something different and in a different way. Not necessarily new or avant-garde — not at all — that was not our idea. What we do is nothing new, it’s just things that people want to wear. That was my creative motivation and the motivation of the people that I started with. I knew that it was a risk. It’s always a risk to do something like that, but I felt it was right to do that. IA: Yes, at the end of the day, fashion is a business and you have to create things people can integrate into their lives. DG: That’s the goal. I mean as a fashion designer, in my opinion, that’s all you want to do. Not to create a fairytale — that’s not reality — but to make that hoodie they want to wear or that dress they need to have. It’s like product design. For me, it’s nothing to do with the conceptual. I mean, fashion used to be like that. It was very conceptual; it was a statement, especially in the ‘90s, which is great and shaped fashion for what it is now. But actually today, the reality is that there is so much stuff available from which you have to choose, that the biggest challenge is to make something that people choose. IA: In the sea of stuff out there, how do you think people pick what they want? DG: You can make an amazing dress and embroidery with high-tech materials and it’s “wow,†it’s really “wow.†Sometimes I see things and I’m like, “Wow, how did they do this?†But then again, is this really important enough? Because, I mean beyond the effect, the actual practicality [matters too]. Being ‘down-to-earth’ with clothing is something I really missed as well. At Margiela, it’s always supposed to be conceptual because that’s the DNA of the brand. At Louis Vuitton, it was very different. It was a luxurious product and had to be beautiful fabric and the cost — a t-shirt for 1,000 euros — I thought that was crazy. How do you make something that people already know, but they still want to buy because they don’t have one? This is the challenge we have to face every six months, which is an exciting challenge for a designer I think. That’s what motivates me. Every time we are having a fitting and we are trying things on we say, “Ok, what do we do with this one now to make it wantable?†That’s hard. It’s much harder than decorating something with beautiful material and shapes. IA: What do you think of the fashion system today? DG: What is not working is the fact that there is no relationship between the creative vision and the commercial vision. I think they are very separated, yet they are very dependent on each other, because the commercial vision needs to pay for the creative vision’s existence, in a way. This dependency creates an unbalanced relationship because the market dictates what creativity needs to do, in order to sell. It tells you we need so and so, five trousers, and 10 dresses — we need this and that. All of this information comes from commercial teams and merchandising. It’s like you have a blank sheet or a collection plan you have to fill out every six months that was given to you by some commercial person, who based their research on previous seasons or on competitor brands that have nothing to do with you. You have no choice — whether you are the creative director or a designer on the team. You also don’t have time to really analyse and think about what you’re doing. You have to be a machine of ideas that produces new things every three months. The whole industry runs so fast because we need to deliver something new to the store every two weeks so the client isn’t bored. They don’t want to wait for six months, so we have the pre-collection, the pre-pre-collection, and the main collection, which nobody is buying, so it all just ends up on a sales rack. The creative part needs to be much more in advance of the market, and to offer something that is not out there, to challenge it and to make the market want it. The whole system just doesn’t work anymore. This whole vicious circle turns and turns at a very fast speed and kills both the creativity and the business. Most of them survive on making bags and perfume at the end of the day. Ready-to-wear, which is the platform and the base of fashion, is really in the shadow today, with a few exceptions. IA: How does digital play a role in some of these problems? DG: Digital speeds everything up because the information is available so fast. We can shop online and we see things online and want to have them as soon as possible. You know, there are pre-orders online and people buy things that have never been produced. We didn’t even buy fabrics yet for some of the pieces at Vetements that have already sold out on the online stores, which is quite crazy. I mean, of course there are good parts. It’s easy to be exposed and you can promote your product and talk to the audience — a larger audience — and transmit your creative message or commercial message. But at the same time it’s very dangerous because it’s very fast and it’s uncontrollable and that’s where I think every brand needs to have some strategy to control that, or some tools to keep it under control, otherwise it’s too risky. IA: How is Vetements responding to these various challenges? DG: We are still trying to figure out our way of doing things. From the beginning we agreed that we would only produce two collections a year and we would not engage ourselves into making pre-collections. At the same time we had to confront fabric deliveries and the whole production chain from having a thread, weaving it into a fabric, making a pattern, making a garment out of it, putting a label on it and selling it to someone. This whole thing is the biggest challenge to us as a young brand. So going forward, at Vetements we are shifting the seasons and not showing during the main season, but only showing our main collection during the pre-collection timing in June and January, which for us would solve a lot of issues in terms of production cycle. IA: How do you see this working? DG: Well, it’s linked to the delivery and timing of the fabric. We now have to wait at least 10 weeks for the production of fabric, which means clothes are being made really late and delivered really late and then their life cycle in the store is so short that there is basically no time to sell them. By showing in March, and delivering the clothes in September, the clothes can only be in store for two or three months before they go on sale. The idea is to show it in June, after men’s fashion week — between men’s and couture in Paris — and for the winter season at the end of January. This means the collection will be delivered, at the latest, in June, which makes the life cycle of the product in the store much longer. At the same time, it makes it easier for the factories that actually have to produce it. Another very important factor is that for the stores, the biggest budget they have to spend on the collection is during the pre-collection period, not in the main collection period. About 80 percent of the budget for most of the stores is for the pre-collection timing in January and June. IA: But this doesn’t address the need of getting the clothes to the customer as soon as possible. DG: Well, that’s a big problem and pre-production [could be] the answer. But pre-production is also very risky. You need someone to be very good at fore- casting, because it’s not going to be the same clothes they bought last season. You need to predict that because it’s quite an important cash flow issue. You need to provide the fabric beforehand and to do this you need to invest a lot of money beforehand — to take a bet. I think it’s much easier to do this for companies like Vetements because we’re small even though we have 135 stockists. It’s still a limited quantity that we produce and it’s much easier because it’s quite a direct relationship with the buyers and with the commercial team who can help. So it’s easier to do this when you’re small and you have these kinds of quantities, rather than when you have a big corporate structure where it’s much harder to move things around. IA: Isn’t it actually easier for a company like Vuitton to do, because they are a vertically integrated retailer, with no wholesale? DG: That’s true. Once you have your own retail it actually simplifies everything. But by the time you have your own retail, at that scale, it’s really a lot of risk to take. I mean, you really need to make sure it’s a product that works, because at the end of the day, what matters is who buys the clothes in the store. You can influence your own retail but you can’t influence the people who come in and buy the clothes — so that’s the tricky part. We can take the risk to do partial pre-production, to order two kilometres of fabric that we will use in the season after as well. It’s okay to do that even though there’s some cash flow involved and we spend some extra money that in the normal model we don’t need to spend. IA: If you decide to do your show between men’s and women’s couture, won’t you be the only one doing a show then? How will you get media attention? DG: It’s risky. I’ve talked about this with people from the press and they’re worried there would not be enough exposure or enough journalists to come to the show. But at the end of the day, the reason is for people to be able to buy it and have it in their wardrobes, more than being exposed in terms of media. So that’s a priority for us and that’s why we thought we will do it anyway, even if it’s outside of the frame. It’s something that’s right for us. IA: When will you start working this way? DG: This season we are doing it as usual and we’re going to show in the beginning of March. We are introducing a men’s collection as well. Due to our aesthetic that has a very masculine origin, we have a lot of male customers that buy our clothes, which are not really made for male customers. We are fitting on girls, we’ve never fitted clothes on guys before. At the end of the day, we decided to do it at the same time as women. So we are going to have a show that is half/half women and menswear. But we are going to show it in March and then the next season will be a big challenge for us, which is a traditional season, and the challenge will be to make the collection in three months to meet our target to do a show in June. IA: Balenciaga, on the other hand, is one of the most prestigious houses in the world, but it’s part of the old system that you seem to be rejecting. How are you splitting your time between the two? DG: I split my time in half basically. The good thing is both of them are in Paris and my studios are 25 minutes away from each other so practically it’s a reasonable situation. I work two and a half days at Vetements and two and a half days at Balenciaga a week. At the end of the day I have never felt so creatively calm as I do since I started to do both jobs. It’s basically about structuring yourself and surrounding yourself with the right people that you can trust and delegate. That’s how it’s happening for now and I am quite happy with the way it goes. In March it’s going to be quite crazy because I have to do two shows within three days; we’re going to show Vetements on Thursday and Balenciaga on Saturday. So, I only have one day in between which I think is probably going to be one of the craziest times I’ve ever had in fashion. But I am up for it. This interview has been edited and condensed. source: http://www.businessoffashion.com/articles/intelligence/demna-gvasalia-reveals-vetements-plan-to-disrupt-the-fashion-system