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Tender Co. Denim

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Thanks for the support guys. I'd like to keep this thread tender-focused as possible! Please PM me about hems and repairs!

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great to see your post Satchell. Sorry to hear you were laid off.


those jeans are an ongoing work of art. 


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I recently bought a tender belt - any recommendations on care?

 

it doesn't seem like it needs much attention at the moment. Probably won't for a while [?]

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Steffen has a few photos of his belt at:

 

http://www.denimworldchampionship.com/forums/topic/sgt-pinback-ih-634-lb-loom-breakers-16-5oz-raw-indigoindigo-duck/page/5/#post-4644

 

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He suffers from an acute addiction to Duck, and was very jealous of Morten's Barge Canvas jacket.

 

Bill! (Rodeo), Is this belt available anywhere?  I really like this buckle.

 

s

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^fixed up by email swixo, thank you! 

 

^^satchel, your jeans are stunning- I'd expect nothing less. Best of luck with Science & Kindness- I'll be sure to recommend you.

 

Sorry for the continuing lack of updates. The upcoming Autumn-Winter production is the biggest yet and has had me running around frantically trying to organise everything. Coming along nicely, though, and we're now off on holiday in the woods for 3 weeks:

 

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Just received a lovely mail from a customer on the 3rd birthday of his wallet:

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it's a beautiful colour, I think, and a much subtler variation across the leather than any of the leather goods I've worn in myself.  Mine tend to go very dark quite quickly, but this gradation is really beautiful I think. Just goes to show how personal these items become, and how different from one use to the next. 

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nice little piece just went up on PORT, which is worth a general browse if anyone doesn't know it. Chris Chasseaud, who wrote this, also does The Nomadic Gentleman, and he put something up there a while ago too. Lovely guy and a good read  :)

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Do we get a sneak peek at the F/W? Can't wait to see what you've made.

 

I'd second that question :) Oipolloi have put up the woad dyed butterfly shirt, which looks excellent. I might need to visit them to check it out 'in the flesh'.

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Do we get a sneak peek at the F/W? Can't wait to see what you've made.

Don't see why not! Thank you for asking  :)

Things will be going out to shops from this week onwards, with coats showing up as it starts getting cooler.

 

These photos were taken by Rory Cole on medium-format film, and came out really nicely I think. I've included a few landscapes too, hope you don't mind the self-indulgence!:

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Garment details and some stories to follow, please just ask if anyone has any questions!

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^ :D  glad you like it!

 

Here's some photos of the first new style to come through: Type 127 jeans. These are a slim tapered cut, tapered to the knee, and then tapered again down to the ankle. They're a slightly lower waist than 129, but by no means a low waist, and considerably slimmer throughout than 130. They got a really good reaction from stockists, so they'll be showing up around and about in various versions. For the moment, though, they're on the Stores and at Meadow in Malmö, Sweden.

 

Here are some pictures of my own pair, size 6, about 2 months of daily wear from rinsed. No wash yet, but a jump in the river a few weeks ago:

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and here they are on:

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and a couple of bonuses of woad 127s in inimitable Meadow style:

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A few quick photos courtesy of House Fil Melange in Tokyo of some special order Sheep's Head chocolate mugs. These are based on a traditional French double-handled cup, and simpler coloured versions will be showing up soon, but FM asked for a more whimsical version!:

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Very interested in the 127's. What's the leg opening on a size 3? 

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^thanks for this cb. Here are full measurements of 127 size 3 (rinse or woad denim):

 

Waist: 33.5"

Thigh (2" down from crotch, perpendicular to outseam): 11"

Knee (13" down from crotch, perpendicular to outseam): 8"

Leg opening: 7"

Inseam: 36"

Front rise: 10"

Back rise: 13.5"

 

Hope this helps- please let me know here or by email if you have any other questions.

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A great photo just in of Georgette, chicken of a great friend of the brand, inspecting a ticking bandana, and plautus head 'ball' and button keyrings, along with some other very nice pocket paraphernalia:

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Happy to introduce a new craft and a new name today- Chris Daunt is a wood engraver, and we've been working together on some really lovely stuff! Here are some photos:

 

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Chris engraves in Box wood, which he selects personally at the log stage- he engraves into end-grain, and uses Box as it has a very tight, even texture. 

 

I asked Chris to do some sketches based on some of the images that have gone up on the website over the years. Here are the first drafts:

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We settled on 3 images, which get transferred onto wood blocks, and then painstakingly engraved, entirely by hand:

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Finally, here's a finished block:

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These blocks are inked:

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and set up in Chris's lovely antique Albion press:

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giving a lovely clean print:

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these prints were then enlarged, showing up all the delicate detail of the hand engraving, and hand screen printed onto new Type 355 Tshirts, ecru or dyed with woad or ochre:

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What updates did you bring to the new shirts?

 

They're cut on the same basic pattern as before, but this time with no rib anywhere- the cuffs and bottom are hemmed with a really deep fold, which gives them a really nice weight, and the neck has a narrow hem all round, which keeps it very flat and minimal. I'll post some worn photos of my own Tshirt asap. I'm out at the factory today, sorting out new wool-cotton horizontal herringbone overshirts, in Type 420 tail shirt and the new Type 450 high-back shirt. Came out really nicely! More soon...

 

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a nice long interview piece went up a couple of days ago on The Sartorial Guide. It's not a site I knew but I've spent quite a bit of time clicking around it since- very well put together and highly recommended!

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Happy belt:

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Less than 6 months old, but it got an inadvertent river wash and then a sun dry and a re-grease, which all darkened it a lot. The curve (as above) is crazy  :)

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For something totally different (and not entirely on-topic, I hope no-one'll mind), Oi Polloi have just published a piece Deborah wrote in their excellent Antiques Clothes Show series. I put something up in Shoes That Look Better With Age, a few months ago, but this is a much better write up after quite a bit of research.

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That's a great article, I find the buried shoe thing a bit disturbing/scary, don't know why, I've heard about it before and maybe other objects too. I guess so long as it's not body parts it can't be that bad , the shoe does remind me of Side Show Bobs feet somewhat . I did an Antique Clothes Show blurb for OP also, it was about an old pair of Clarks but it was a bit off the cuff, yours is by far the most interesting so far and your home looks great too. Over and out.

Edited by jgpp63

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I got delivery from William yesterday, including this lovely ochre dyed horizontal herringbone tail shirt in a 50% Cotton 50% Wool mix! 

 

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Beautiful shirt Mvk,

here is a shot of a few Tender items including a 428 short sleeve shirt (new favorite from past season), Type 420 shirt and a unfinished wollen box cloth coat dyed with ochre.

 

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Edited by jason995511

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Looks fantastic Jason, thank you! I especially love the colours you've got on the two shirts.

 

Here, as promised, is a MAMMOTH walk through the making of some beautiful woollen fabric from the new production (including Jason's coat, above)....

 

Raw wool is delivered packed in tight bales:

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which are core tested with a drill to make sure the fibre is good all the way through (the same method as used in cheese-making):

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When the bales are opened the fibre is extremely compacted:
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so before anything else happens it has to be loosened up, through a gentle set of rollers which draw the yarn up and over through a chamber with a blower in it, which breaks the clumps of fibre into a looser structure:
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From here, the wool is blown up into a box with rotating punched discs which help to filter out larger pieces of sticks and other plant matter (remember at this stage the wool is still in the state that it came off the sheep):
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Next, the fibre is blown through a fine mist of mineral oil, which will act as a lubricant during the spinning process, and get washed out during finishing:
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Edited by rodeo bill

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Finally, in something that feels very like a Mike Nelson installation, the fibre is blown out into storage rooms. There’s a shute blowing into the top corner, and a trapdoor in the floor letting the wool down onto the carding and spinning floor below, when it’s needed. The fibre at this point is beautifully fluffy, still looks like the natural product, and smells incredible:

 

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The next stage all takes place behind safety shields, as it’s very fast-paced and involves a lot of revolving spikes, so apologies that some of the photos are a little unclear. The loose wool fibre drops down from the storage rooms above into big hoppers:
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and is drawn up through a series of carding rollers. Carding takes the mixed up fibres and straightens them out so that they’re all pointed in the same direction, preparing them for spinning. Originally it was done manually using a pair of stiff brushes, but carding rollers were introduced with other innovations in the textile industry in the early 19th Century. The rollers are covered in stiff wire pins which draw the fibre between them and part the clumps into parallel strands. Different sized rollers help further break it up:
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  • Luisa via Roma (US)
    Brand - 125 x 125