denimdestroyedmylife

arcteryx veilance

3,097 posts in this topic

Yes, I suppose you're right @shifty

I live in Vancouver where, according to the CBC,  90% of the population owns an Arcteryx jacket of some kind. 

My local Arcteryx store has a (small) wall dedicated to Veilance garments. I can see how many a dad that just likes Arcteryx would buy their pants from that wall

Edit: who cares about that dad, doesn't change the pieces.

 

Edited by AnomalousTautology
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Not sure I'd use the Cayce Pollard reference as yes- she was adversely aware of direct branding, but also had an eye for non-linear 'lines' of clothing. I'm thinking that the branding can very often manifest itself too far into the clothing itself. As witnessed of late by both Veilance and Acronym imo. To bring this idea further, I believe that in the character of Cayce, Gibson was trying to express the inherent classical-ness of certain design tropes, and how they transcend hypes, genres, buzz (Rickson pun intended), political movements, and pop/fashion culture as a whole.  

Edited by brainerd666
I'm stoopid
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2 hours ago, brainerd666 said:

Not sure I'd use the Cayce Pollard reference as yes- she was adversely aware of direct branding, but also had an eye for non-linear 'lines' of clothing. I'm thinking that the branding can very often manifest itself too far into the clothing itself. As witnessed of late by both Veilance and Acronym imo. To bring this idea further, I believe that in the character of Cayce, Gibson was trying to express the inherent classical-ness of certain design tropes, and how they transcend hypes, genres, buzz (Rickson pun intended), political movements, and pop/fashion culture as a whole.  

Yes, I do suppose that Veilance and Acronym have become more than aware of their places in fashion.

..And neither of the two can be considered a "design free zone"

Cayce was an example of classic design sure, but she was also an exaggeration of the state of branding and fashion in the early 2000s, the ubiquity of certain brands that constituted the norm, you know, the "Tommy Hilfiger event horizon" where clothing that can be no more derivative, more devoid of soul, and their presence in the environment of inescapable advertising. A point where calculated design and more and more targeted advertising is ever present (insert Francis Fukuyama quote on the "satisfaction of sophisticated consumer demands" here) and the most interesting fashion is a kind of anti-fashion. It's in Stonestreet's slept-in suit, and that shpeal Cayce has about Doretea attempt to "out minimalize" her, and the infamous Buzz Rickson's black MA-1 (which is its own ironic beast [https://www.historypreservation.com/products-page/brands/buzz-ricksons-william-gibson-collection-black-ma-1-intermediate-flying-jacket-modified-tailored-cut/]).

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AV and ACR are polar opposites. a closer analogy would be Apple. AV is a super fast growing brand that has successfully moved from a boutique context to a mainstream context because, like apple, it created a demand that didn't exist before. Consumers with a more traditional taste in clothing and a good amount of money to spend would take their money for outerwear to the same brands that make their suits and sweaters, whose traditional products have performance drawbacks that the customer simply considered inherent in the product. Of course a nice overcoat sucks in the rain. And then arc'teryx shows up and flips that paradigm, creating a demand where previously there was none. Much like nobody realized they need a tablet or a screen without visible pixels until apple came along.

I would be willing to bet that 99% of all people who own AV only own one piece, and do not 'follow' the brand or obsess over it's background and design aesthetic but simply needed a new coat or stumbled on a blazer and thought "this is different and cool". In the eyes of the average consumer, AV is somewhere on a continuum with aspesi and hugo boss. It is not driven by the same kind of market dynamics as ACR, and is very traditional from a business perspective. Much like Apple, the AV approach works because it's a excellent combination of business savvy and a design-centric product development approach. 

 

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I think I accidentally revealed Veilance 2017 F/W webpage. However, when I clicked on 2017 F/W, it shows as below link, there is nothing new..

https://veilance.arcteryx.com/ProductFind.aspx?country=ca&language=en&collection=Veilance_Collection_Fall_2017

I think they are preparing to launch of 2017 F/W and the Veilance webiste purchasing UI has been revamped. The way to show the stock and the detail pictures is different from before. More user friendly to shop around their website.

Can't wait to see what's new in 2017 F/W series.

 

螢幕快照 2017-07-25 02.15.53.png

Edited by Chiels
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On 7/21/2017 at 10:03 PM, shifty said:

Veilance is the kind of brand that isn't daunting in a fashion sense and can appeal to the average person as just nice minimal design, but people who are in the know can appreciate it for everything else that the brand has to offer as far as aesthetics and detailing. I've seen more veilance on uncool dads wearing square toed loafers than I've seen elsewhere, and while thats not the same audience that veilance has really found a niche with (like people here), I don't feel like it takes away anything from it.

Completely agree. I have a few finance bros who own veilance jackets and they don't really know much about the brand, other than what the Barney's SA told them. I think for all of these guys, they were looking for a clean, warm jacket that could be used to the office (ie. something that wasn't Moncler or Canada Goose) and veilance appealed to them. 

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