Jump to content
superdupersang

Architecture

Recommended Posts

© both, and much nonsense being said by people with a shallow understanding of both fields

^this.

the whole concept reminds me of bits from Sontag's "Illness as Metaphor.'

let things be what they are,

(though I do enjoy me some richard sennett. 'Flesh and Stone' was good.)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
© both, and much nonsense being said by people with a shallow understanding of both fields

To be fair, Koolhaas and Barthes before him managed to do "(d) None of the above" in their own fields.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Good luck with that review Franklin.

The constant appropriation of 'architect' or 'architecture' to lend perceived weight and complexity has always irked me a little bit, (no offense to Guru, RIP) and always draws strong reaction within the profession. It seems pretty lame when you (for example) do a job search for 'architect' and half the results turn up are for Systems Architect, or Information Architect, and yet in many jurisdictions a non-licensed designer can be cited and fined for calling themselves an Architect in relation to actual buildings.....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

2 things:

1. I hate people who leave after crits. If we have a 8 hr crit. And you just so happen to be first. Leaving to go home is THE biggest bitch move. If I have to stay the whole fucking time because I'm presenting last, then you better fucking stay asshole. Sooooo lame.

2. I can't get over my obsession with Junya Ishigami. Dude is so tight. Saw a lecture by him about 2 weeks ago and it was amazing. Really interesting stuff, especially from a tech standpoint, which is the best. Like that metal table?! And that 1-ton balloon?! So dope! Not to mention he does great drawings. He showed a video of the table, apparently its so thin that when you touch it, it ripples slightly. Wish I could find a video. He also had a video of the balloon where a little 2 year old walks up and lifts it over her head. So based.

http://www.iconeye.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=3544:junya-ishigami

Table:

3942393629_05fa2892ef.jpg

6-junya-ishigami-Table-via-east-asia-architecture.jpg

Balloon:

1195668218image_web.jpg

ishigami3.gif

Z18UkhGUZ8s

Other stuff:

ishigami4.gif

ishigami5.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Funny/appropriate that he worked for SANAA before starting his practice, that bottom image of the Facility looks really similar to one of SANAA's residential projects that I can't put my finger on... though I think theirs incorporated gauzy curtains as well, but a similar effect.

Beautiful stuff though.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

wished I had gone to the Ishigami one, but I thought Nicholas de Monchaux was pretty awesome. Anything with the use of GIS always lures me.

cosgrove - why don you pull a bitch move by coming in around the time you present. that way you dont have to stay 'till the end you and you get more sleep. win win

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
The constant appropriation of 'architect' or 'architecture' to lend perceived weight and complexity has always irked me a little bit, (no offense to Guru, RIP) and always draws strong reaction within the profession. It seems pretty lame when you (for example) do a job search for 'architect' and half the results turn up are for Systems Architect, or Information Architect, and yet in many jurisdictions a non-licensed designer can be cited and fined for calling themselves an Architect in relation to actual buildings.....

Cited and fined, didn't know that.

But why shouldn't we use 'architecture' to describe constructed intangible space? The social 'sciences' didn't appropriate the latter word just to seem grand, they did so only to accurately reflect their use of ideas previously thought to be the domain of the natural sciences. Speaking of 'designing' regulatory matrices and building network 'architectures' seems to be a useful metaphorical way of borrowing language to reflect the changing nature of one's task.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

cosgrove - why don you pull a bitch move by coming in around the time you present. that way you dont have to stay 'till the end you and you get more sleep. win win

10 chipboards

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

btw, if you don't mind me asking, whod you ask for your letter of rec cos?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Cited and fined, didn't know that.

But why shouldn't we use 'architecture' to describe constructed intangible space? The social 'sciences' didn't appropriate the latter word just to seem grand, they did so only to accurately reflect their use of ideas previously thought to be the domain of the natural sciences. Speaking of 'designing' regulatory matrices and building network 'architectures' seems to be a useful metaphorical way of borrowing language to reflect the changing nature of one's task.

I too don't find the use of 'architect' or 'architecture' outside of the field that agreeable. I think it's more of a personal thing. It's like getting the title without any of the work. Even now I wouldn't call myself an architect even though I'm pretty deep into the study and fully expect to enter the field. It just doesn't seem fair in my mind. But as you said, it does and should make sense to use the term to describe a certain framework that keeps a system together...But It still seems a little out of place though.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

But why shouldn't we use 'architecture' to describe constructed intangible space? The social 'sciences' didn't appropriate the latter word just to seem grand, they did so only to accurately reflect their use of ideas previously thought to be the domain of the natural sciences. Speaking of 'designing' regulatory matrices and building network 'architectures' seems to be a useful metaphorical way of borrowing language to reflect the changing nature of one's task.

Trust; I get the argument, and see the metaphor, but would have to disagree that 'sounding grand' is not a significant reason why they choose to use 'architect'. Designer and Engineer would work, even if 'designer' may be a bit too vague. Engineers just lobby harder to protect their title and status.

And calling political systems or software hierarchy 'constructed, intangible space' is QUITE a stretch. On the same lines of most archispeak, and gets nothing but an eyeroll.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Illustrative example: when news shows refer to Karl Rove and other political operatives as "campaign architects" it certainly seems like they are appropriating the essence of the title, if not the actual meaning.

That being said, of all the licensed architects and unlicensed designers/etc that I know: the gripe about non-architects who are in NO way connected to the field (ie Karl rove) is a different and much less specific dislike than those who misuse it within the field, since that's a legal/licensing issue that's pretty specific. The non-design professionals who use it more as a descriptor than a title are just, as Appleseed said, eye roll worthy.

I'm just reiterating what's already been said. I guess, but pardon me: I'm in Eugene for the day looking for an apt and. My car just died... So im sitting in a cafe waiting for roadside assistance instead. FML.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, once you become a real Eugenean, you'll be doing that on a bike and bitch only when you pop a tire. ;-)

I dunno where you're looking, and forget if your girl is or isn't with you for the next year. Lived for a year over at Broadway Place apts., decent and quiet, and relatively close to campus, without actually being part of the campus scene. Plus there's a lot of bars within stumbling distance. Was told their rents had gone up quite a bit since I was there, but....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I found a really nice seeming place in a small building owned by an old couple, apparently populated by almost all grad students, so it should be nice and quiet. Rent is higher than I'd like, but meh.

it's right around 16th and Pearl, not a bad walk, and definitely not a bad bike ride.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Right, agree that misuse of the term in a casual way gets an eyeroll - CIAS's Karl Rove example. But if used in a more formal, well-considered manner in academic writing, why not? Appleseed, political and social systems already use the language of system & environment - models of control are visualised and described in three dimensions, theorists use the words hierarchies, structures, interstitial space... I might ask the writer to justify his use of spatial metaphors, but I wouldn't instantly discount them just because they're non-architects referring to space and architecture.

Basically: agree that jargon (archispeak or otherwise) and borrowing concepts only to obscure ideas can be unhelpful and unnecessary, but if appropriately used it can illustrate ideas in a useful way.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

anyone know where i can find a selection of fujimoto-esque vector people?

venice-architecture-biennale-sou-fujimoto-architects_0.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Firstly: Dwell, meh, etc etc.

Secodly: Despite that, this still struck me in a variety of ways, (maybe just because I'm quite drunk and mildly stressed out about the possibility of never ever finding a job.)

but still.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

anyone with their finger on the architectural school pulse in europe?

gonna study abroad. ideally i'd like to hit up scandinavia. toying with aalto university (helsinki), kth (stockholm), perhaps RDAFA (copenhagen).

i'm really keen on a place with a solid studio culture / student cohort. perhaps delft is the obvious choice but i'm not as keen on the netherlands.

anyone?

edit: helsinki not scando but near enough.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

a friend of mine studied abroad in copenhagen and said that friendliness amongst students was much much rarer than in the us (or at our school anyway). she mostly made friends with other people who were studying abroad there. she also reckoned that was a regional cultural difference rather than the school itself. if that answers your question somewhat...?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

hmm, not really. looking for specific school recommendations. i know what the scandos are like, you gotta get them out on the drink, then they're friendly.

thanks though!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
a friend of mine studied abroad in copenhagen and said that friendliness amongst students was much much rarer than in the us (or at our school anyway). she mostly made friends with other people who were studying abroad there. she also reckoned that was a regional cultural difference rather than the school itself. if that answers your question somewhat...?

I'm a 2nd year MArch student who will be living a "schooling" @ DIS (Copenhagen) leaving in just over 2 weeks..

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Cited and fined, didn't know that.

But why shouldn't we use 'architecture' to describe constructed intangible space? The social 'sciences' didn't appropriate the latter word just to seem grand, they did so only to accurately reflect their use of ideas previously thought to be the domain of the natural sciences. Speaking of 'designing' regulatory matrices and building network 'architectures' seems to be a useful metaphorical way of borrowing language to reflect the changing nature of one's task.

A few things: first- being able to call oneself "architect" (in the building/design industry) is a right of passage earned from a rather strenuous, tedious, and long road pursued (and accomplished) by few that have the stamina, commitment, and motivation to take on such title... I'm just finishing my 2nd year of the MArch degree, (with an alread completed BArch + 3500 IDP hours, and 4/7 ARE sections complete)- and fuck... I'm tired, and worn out of looking/talking about building design... However, it's my life & passion, so I march on- steadfast.

As for the user who posted the very nicely written synopsis of their justification of "architect/architecture" in the nerd-alert field of computers--- here here, I agree wholeheartedly (sp?)- right on...

After being on Sufu for this long, and just now finding out about an architecture sub forum... Do I even dare to ask everyone's thoughts on deconstructivist architecture, and furthermore- algorithmic architecture???

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey Franklin, Appleseed, and any others who are in the field/in school, can I ask what your thoughts are on people who have unrelated BAs and then get MAs in architecture? How big is the disadvantage, during school and then out looking for jobs?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

^ i have plenty of them in my masters. in short, most suck. really hard.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Hey Franklin, Appleseed, and any others who are in the field/in school, can I ask what your thoughts are on people who have unrelated BAs and then get MAs in architecture? How big is the disadvantage, during school and then out looking for jobs?

how far unrelated? like bio, chem? In my opinion I don't think there's a lot of majors that are unrelated to architecture. It's so broad nowadays.

But if you're not in any art related field then doing those summer jumpstart is a good way to get a good feel and improve your senses in the field so you're not at a big disadvantage to the arch students.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Usually the unrelated majors have a much higher learning curve in regards to the software, and get pigeonholed into doing an entire project with little knowledge of technology readily available to them...

So for instance- when I'm at the stage of putting my design into the 3d world via rhino/grasshopper or whatever other 3d modeling program I use, the unrelated majors struggle to do the same in sketch up, or some other program- and since the learning curve can be big for some (or very little for others...) their boards never come out looking as good as the others that have spent 7+ years in the major

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

^^ Yes. There is a very steep learning curve. Sure, your theory or idea can be on the same level or better than someone with experience but just understand that its going to be much harder to represent your ideas. Something that may take you 3 days to figure out how to model and complete may take someone else a few hours. As you continuously do more architecture work, you get better and better at representation and understanding the field beyond just learning the software. Those things just take time and the difference is noticeable.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks everyone. That's what I figured. One more question and then I'll stop making hopeless inquiries:

Is doing a post-bac program or taking independent classes to cut down the disadvantage worthwhile, or did I just miss the boat entirely? I don't want to insult those of you who worked incredibly hard in undergrad, I know it still wouldn't be nearly as good as the full BA training, but I am finishing my BA now, double majoring so I can't add anything more, and I'd like to think there's still a way to catch up at least somewhat if I were willing to put in the time.

ps Franklin are you at 999 posts on purpose? are you about to post a sufu zombie composite?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Fwiw my undergrad is not in arch. (sociology and anthropology) and I definitely benefitted massively from taking post-bac classes and studios. The biggest thing is that they simply allow you compile a portfolio that includes some pertinent work.

As far as professional potential based on either 2 or 3 year masters programs I would say among the group of architects I know the difference between the 2 vs. 3 year folks exists, but it's overshadowed by the difference between those who have a m.arch of some kind vs. those who have a 5 year degree.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now