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Architecture

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My three most hated arch. questions from non-arch people are, in no particular order:

So, you like The Fountainhead?

So, what kind of architecture do you do?

So, you're like rich, right?

no hate Mag.

--------

Wes'll be over at GSD in the fall, I dunno if you're stuck in core classes or not Frank.

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So, what kind of architecture do you do?

When I tell people I'm going back to school for arch. their first question is always, "oh, neat - what kind of architecture are you interested in?"

eff u.

(it often continues: "I hear Green Architecture is getting pretty big, so maybe look into that?" - but this is a whole other bitchfest)

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My three most hated arch. questions from non-arch people are, in no particular order:

So, you like The Fountainhead?

So, what kind of architecture do you do?

So, you're like rich, right?

no hate Mag.

--------

Wes'll be over at GSD in the fall, I dunno if you're stuck in core classes or not Frank.

i just want to know how it's taught

gatdamn arkitakt douchebags

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to answer your question magnetic it depends on the firm

some specialize in, for example, hospitals or schools, because there are specific requirements that go along with those programs

others work more broadly, especially ones with a big staff

but i don't think most people are like "i think parks over 20 acres are the only interesting things to design"

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i just want to know how it's taught

gatdamn arkitakt douchebags

Designer douchebags.

Well Mag, in schools architecture is usually taught in 3 categories.

First you'll have your history/theory classes which focus on the main concepts behind styles/designs/where the field has been/assumptions on where its going/analysis of important architectural texts/case studies of important projects. That sort of thing. Classes will usually be focused on a specific topic, i.e. Housing, Metropolis, etc. and incorporate those various mediums.

Then you'll have your Tech classes which focus on building technologies and construction methods. These classes explore certain methods of building and emerging technologies such as laser cutting, vacuum forming, cnc milling, casting, electronics, etc. Often times these classes require intensive physical modeling and actually constructing something. These can also focus on specific materials such as concrete, wood, plaster, metal, etc. (My last tech class was about exploring the material properties of raw Zinc sheet metal).

Lastly you'll have your studio classes where you do the bulk of your design work in response to the design problem set forth by the professor. Studios usually are taught in two ways. First you'll have your core studios when you first start school which you don't have a choice in choosing your design problem really. That is part of the pedagogy of the school so this is generally where you see the interests of a specific school come to light, such as parametricism, grasshopper, digital tech, and so on. After core studios you'll have the option of choosing your professor and consequently what studio and design problem you want to investigate. These are in the later years of your studies and after all this, some schools will offer a thesis while others may not.

Also, depending on the school, there may be an emphasis on certain topics more than others. SCI-ARC is a very different school than UCLA for example even though they may teach according to the same organization. That's why it is so important to choose your school carefully. You are basically subscribing to their belief system and you have to be careful not to become a clone of someone you're not interest in.

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Pretty spot on. Depending on the school, you may find those three divisions a bit more blurred or more segregated. I feel my undergrad vs. grad experience were on fairly different ends of the spectrum, with a lot of my history/theory stuff being taught by actual Art History department types in undergrad, as opposed to lot of the tech and studio stuff being essentially the same in grad. It depends on how narrow the focus is, and I wouldn't hesitate to suggest taking the widest angle if you're just getting into it. Far too many of the recent grads I know have very little if any historical context to be able to rationalize any of their fluid-form script-making technical sklls. So be very wary about those belief systems that will be pressed into you, as they often produce myopic students that lack the fundamentals.

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yeah this is very true. I go to tulane, which is very analysis heavy as opposed to parametrics and scripting and such and as such I can rationalize the shit out of anything but my computer skills are kinda... well...

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thesis final review tomorrow afternoon. still waiting on 3d printed model to arrive.

wish me luck

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will do. boards have been done for days, base model and digital model for the print too, but our in-house 3d printer fucked it up a few days ago and then exploded or something last night, halfway through printing my friend's model... no bueno

edit - as it happens pics from the first day are here, if anyone cares. not sure if it's a public album or not

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It exploded? 3D explosion? You must have tried to print in 4D.

Pics are public. Unfortunately its just pictures of people and not really the work.

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model done, reviews done

we had the sciarc undergraduate chair by the by

he liked the project

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4 weeks left to complete a semester of studio. Why do I keep doing this to myself.

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http://www.dwell.com/articles/a-platform-for-living.html

Just wanted to post this.

Love every fucking aspect of that house. The fact that this is their 'weekend retreat' makes me want to deck myself out in ....research gear from top to bottom and live on a mountain top.

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http://www.dwell.com/articles/a-platform-for-living.html

Just wanted to post this.

Love every fucking aspect of that house. The fact that this is their 'weekend retreat' makes me want to deck myself out in ....research gear from top to bottom and live on a mountain top.

Plz click [Here]

but in all seriousness, I saw that last month, and maybe it's just the article, but they sure come off as a bunch of bored middle aged goons playing dress up in the woods.

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Not a lot of insulation in those fiberglass panels. Wonder how the place fares when it's storming outside. Really more like an alpine overnight cabin than anything else.

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Not a lot of insulation in those fiberglass panels. Wonder how the place fares when it's storming outside. Really more like an alpine overnight cabin than anything else.

you dress like hiroki nakamura - wear 6-7 layers.

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Not a lot of insulation in those fiberglass panels. Wonder how the place fares when it's storming outside. Really more like an alpine overnight cabin than anything else.

Appleseed, I will return in ten years and you will build me a house like that with insulation.

And dinosaurs.

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with tents on the deck too?

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it's ludicrous that that actually got built

but I have kinda always wanted to have a little concrete cube out in wyoming or something and be an architecture hermit

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^ where to cop?

Something from left field, in a different sense: http://www.urban-age.net/events/publicLectures/2011/05/17/the-architecture-of-governance/

"Professor Jerry Frug argues that the organization of democratic government, and in particular, the relationship between local and national governments, should be viewed as a structure. This structure has its own design, or architecture, and there are a number of alternative designs currently in vogue around the world. These designs can be analyzed and critiqued like any structural design. The lecture offers a new way of thinking about alternative structures and will propose ideas for improving the current way we organize democratic government."

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Entirely curious to see if his cross-pollination will result in either: (a) A simplistic definition of architecture, or (B) a relatively limited view of political systems.

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I'm in the middle of an all nighter before a review at noon. I'll look into this once I'm finished. I just wanted you to know I support you.

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Entirely curious to see if his cross-pollination will result in either: (a) A simplistic definition of architecture, or (B) a relatively limited view of political systems.

© both, and much nonsense being said by people with a shallow understanding of both fields

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