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Posted (edited) · Hidden by rirawin, December 20, 2011 - No reason given
Hidden by rirawin, December 20, 2011 - No reason given

Is the Undercover noodle bar any good? The lady is back home over the Christmas period and I wouldn't mind sending her on a reccy to the place. Of course, if she goes and it's shit I won't hear the last of it...

Edited by rirawin

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is the undercover noodle bar any good? the lady is back home over the christmas period and i wouldn't mind sending her on a reccy to the place. of course, if she goes and it's shit i won't hear the last of it...

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^ Sorry rira I didn't try it...just went in there, had a quick chat and look around. Also the fact that I had a bad experience with 牛肉水餃湯麵 the previous day didn't help either,

My friends and I used this. Kinda useful:

http://www.taiwannig...ubs/city/taipei

Edited by DJ_Flame

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^ Yep, 500-700 NT is a decent price. I heard of members only joints but I never been to one.

thanks bud. i've been to almost every major asian country, but for some reason i always skipped over tw bc i figure its just another hk. i have a feeling i've been pretty ignorant. lookin forward to tw!

another quick question. are there places where you can get factory overages or samples of brand name goods made in taiwan? for example, there's tons of places i kno of in hong kong where you can find clothing made in the canton region for dirt cheap. one time i got a sample polo sport snorkel jacket that would be $600 for $70.

Edited by Landy

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have been in taipei all week on superfuture reconnaissance mission. was in undercover yesterday and i think the only food on sale was 3 muffins in a glass jar... anyway wasn't really looking for noodles - but 50% off much of the stock made some of it almost affordable... nice interior [as expected].

trying to get our supertravel taipei listing in a bit better shape, taipei is one of those cities that takes a bit of time to get your head around... still having trouble figuring out what names to call the different areas...

is the undercover noodle bar any good? the lady is back home over the christmas period and i wouldn't mind sending her on a reccy to the place. of course, if she goes and it's shit i won't hear the last of it...

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are there any shops that sell tricker's or white's in taiwan?

I've not seen anyone that sells Tricker's. There are a couple of online sellers on Yahoo Auctions. You might be better off ordering them directly from the UK from someone like Pediwear (free shipping and no VAT).

The Red Wing Store sells White's as well as Wesco, Chippewa, and their own in-house brand

http://www.redwing.com.tw/

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Just came back from Taipei. Fantastic city. Very charming, it has not lost its soul (unlike Singapore in many ways). It pays if you can speak Chinese or Tai-yu, everyone is friendly and honest. Great city. Wish I was living here. I got depressed after spending 5 days there.

For a more mature crowd, do check out the cocktail bars. Barkode, W Hotel WOO bar and Marquee.

Artefacts in Dong Qu or Cha Jie sells SILENT Damir Doma and many other interesting items and brands.

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Noticed a few new places (new to me at least) last time I was out.

Filson Store - Opened up next door to Take 5.

Authentic (at Hotel V) - Address: Dunhua South Road, Section 1, Lane 177, #48, B1

They've got Whites, Schott, Danner, Filson, Alden, Naked & Famous, and Aero Leather

Tried on a pair of Alden #8 Shell Long Wings. Beautiful shoes unfortunately the last doesn't work for my foot as my heel kept slipping out. They charge 22500 NT which is about $100 more than the US. Not sure if discounts are available.

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Planning ahead... I'll be in Taipei February 2013 for a month visiting the girlfriend's family and for Chinese New Year etc. I'll be pretty bored during the day when she goes to work, as I won't have anything to do apart from walk the dog. So any Superfuturians out there down to hang out? grab a coffee? lunch? or whatever's good.

I don't expect many if any replies... but I live in hope.

Edited by rirawin

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Hello, superfuture.

I know this thread hasn't been active lately, but I wanted to see if there are any Taiwanese posters still active on here.

I just graduated high school here in the U.S. and will be going to college here in Taiwan, instead of staying in the U.S..

I am Taiwanese, and have been to Taiwan about a dozen times since I was a little kid. I decided to go to college in Taiwan instead of in the U.S. because I wanted to become completely fluent in Mandarin and be able to fully read and write Chinese.

If anyone on here has gone to University in Taiwan, what is it like?

Edited by Atrocious

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A rather strange choice, in my honest opinion, unless you are going to a top 5 university in Taiwan. You would've been better off going to a UC than going to college in Taiwan, in terms of hoping to find a good-paying job after you graduate. Your plan of becoming totally fluent in Mandarin will be hard, unless you plan on socializing with locals all the time. It's not impossible, just hard.

I spent a year in Taiwan studying abroad, just learning Mandarin. I did take a local class (taught in English) though, and can tell you that students at National Taiwan University (å°å¤§ï¼‰are pretty intense students, generally speaking.

What university are you applying for there?

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People all over East Asia have fetishes with American college degrees. You can take Mandarin courses in American colleges too, man. You can also choose to study abroad for half a year / a full year if you choose to, as well. If you don't already have a high school level comprehension of Chinese, how the hell are you going to write essays in Chinese?

If you tell me that you plan on majoring in something like English or Art History in Taiwan, I'll spit blood.

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People all over East Asia have fetishes with American college degrees. You can take Mandarin courses in American colleges too, man. You can also choose to study abroad for half a year / a full year if you choose to, as well. If you don't already have a high school level comprehension of Chinese, how the hell are you going to write essays in Chinese?

If you tell me that you plan on majoring in something like English or Art History in Taiwan, I'll spit blood.

A rather strange choice, in my honest opinion, unless you are going to a top 5 university in Taiwan. You would've been better off going to a UC than going to college in Taiwan, in terms of hoping to find a good-paying job after you graduate. Your plan of becoming totally fluent in Mandarin will be hard, unless you plan on socializing with locals all the time. It's not impossible, just hard.

I spent a year in Taiwan studying abroad, just learning Mandarin. I did take a local class (taught in English) though, and can tell you that students at National Taiwan University (å°å¤§ï¼‰are pretty intense students, generally speaking.

What university are you applying for there?

I was accepted into 文藻外語學院 (Wenzao Ursuline College of Languages) in Kaohsiung. I plan on majoring in Chinese as a Second Language.

I know it's going to be extremely difficult to become completely fluent. My parents (both from Taiwan) don't agree with what I want to do and would rather see me stay in the U.S. for my college education. I didn't apply to any colleges here in the U.S. while I was a high school senior so it's either I go to Taiwan for college or go to a Community College here in the U.S.. Plus, I don't know of any schools in the U.S. that has an option of studying in abroad in Taiwan.

I know that I have the option of taking Mandarin courses in an American college, but one of the reasons why I don't want to go to college the U.S. is because I wanted to start learning Chinese now rather than later. I've been going to a Chinese School on Saturday since I was 4 years old, but my reading level is the equivalent of a Taiwanese 1st grader while my speaking level is only conversational at best.

I have to apply to 師大 (National Taiwan Normal University) in order to improve my Mandarin speaking/reading/writing skills before I even think about going to a college in Taiwan.

Edited by Atrocious

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If your parents aren't too concerned about how fast you go to school and stuff... I'd recommend you go to CC in the US, then transfer to a nice university... THEN go study at 師大。

You already told me that you basically forgot almost all of your reading and writing skills. Aiyo, just take a community college class to learn the basics again, then move over. Don't move over to Taiwan to re-learn how to write 我最喜歡åƒçš„æ±è¥¿æ˜¯ç‚’飯ï¼That move would be a huge waste of your time, and your parents' money.

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What you're saying is right. What I'm most conflicted about is whether or not it's a good or bad idea to go to college in Taiwan or stay in the U.S.

I know that going to a cc, then transferring to a University in America is the smart, safe choice, but I don't want to let this opportunity I have to go to Taiwan right now possibly slip away.

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You are going to throw the possibility of getting an american degree to study Chinese in taiwan? Something which you can do any other point in your life? People in Taiwan are going to think you are crazy. I just spent two years there btw.

Edited by lv d0n

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well, i wouldn't necessarily think or say that i'm "throwing the possibility of getting an american degree to study Chinese in taiwan" and i know i can always learn chinese in the future.

i'll be attending 師大, which is essentially a prep school for foreign students to learn chinese before attening a "real" university later on.

worst case scenario, things don't work out for me and return to the u.s. and attend a cc before transferring to a university.

how was your experience in taiwan?

Edited by Atrocious

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Taiwan is alright if you're the partying type. There's only 5 major clubs and they get played out easily unfortunately. I studied at Shida also but you really can learn all the things with just a textbook. Foreign students go there just to party anyways. Go if you want a party experience with underage Taiwanese breezies and dropping $$ on bottles a night. But if you're a broke college student, its hardly fun at all.

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I also want to live in Taiwan in the future. My mom is from Taiwan, and I actually just spent the last two months there with my relatives. In the past I have gone in the summer with my family. But I am in the same situation as you when it comes to my Chinese speaking and reading abilities. I can speak reasonably well, but can't really read or write. I think your best choice is definitely to just stay in U.S. and get a degree first. There isn't much money to be made in Taiwan at all if you don't have a strong degree. Fortunately, I'm attending Georgia Tech (famous in Taiwan), and I'm able to take Chinese classes here as well. An American college degree is the thing that will help you the most at this point, and I honestly don't think there is anything worth doing until you have one, no matter how much you love Taiwan and want to learn Chinese. I'm basically attending college in the U.S. with the end goal of getting a good job in Taiwan.

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Taiwan is alright if you're the partying type. There's only 5 major clubs and they get played out easily unfortunately. I studied at Shida also but you really can learn all the things with just a textbook. Foreign students go there just to party anyways. Go if you want a party experience with underage Taiwanese breezies and dropping $$ on bottles a night. But if you're a broke college student, its hardly fun at all.

Okay, well I'm not going to Taiwan for the purpose of having "fun" or partying and drinking, but nice to know about the clubs. But how was your experience at Shida and taiwan as a whole?

I also want to live in Taiwan in the future. My mom is from Taiwan, and I actually just spent the last two months there with my relatives. In the past I have gone in the summer with my family. But I am in the same situation as you when it comes to my Chinese speaking and reading abilities. I can speak reasonably well, but can't really read or write. I think your best choice is definitely to just stay in U.S. and get a degree first. There isn't much money to be made in Taiwan at all if you don't have a strong degree. Fortunately, I'm attending Georgia Tech (famous in Taiwan), and I'm able to take Chinese classes here as well. An American college degree is the thing that will help you the most at this point, and I honestly don't think there is anything worth doing until you have one, no matter how much you love Taiwan and want to learn Chinese. I'm basically attending college in the U.S. with the end goal of getting a good job in Taiwan.

Wow, nice to see that there is someone else in a similar situation. I agree with you that staying in the U.S. to get a college degree is more of a "safer" option that just going striaght to Taiwan. But I can't attend a University in the U.S. unless I attend a Community College first and then transfer (assuming I do well and my grades are good enough). I'll probably be attending Shida in Taiwan for a year and depending on how much my Chinese reading and writing skills along with my Mandarin speaking level improves, I can apply to a University in Taiwan or I'll have to come back to the U.S. and attend a Community College.

Edited by Atrocious

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"Good-paying job" in Taiwan is almost an oxymoron now unless you are really exceptional in business, technology (hardware or software), or engineering in general. Most young people from Taiwan that are good at what they do, and actually get a decent salary, have already moved to the Mainland.

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i thought this thread was taipei shopping only lol

to atrocious: the grass is not always greener on the other side

ã„´going to taiwan to learn basic chinese sounds like you just want to put off doing "hard" shit and screw around

you may look chinky but you will realize you are different beyond just the language barrier

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i thought this thread was taipei shopping only lol

to atrocious: the grass is not always greener on the other side

ã„´going to taiwan to learn basic chinese sounds like you just want to put off doing "hard" shit and screw around

you may look chinky but you will realize you are different beyond just the language barrier

True, but believe me, the last thing I'll be doing in Taiwan is "screw around".

Of course I'm different, why would I think otherwise?

The only sure thing going forward for myself is that I'll only be in Taiwan for a year, depending on how well I do in prep school and if I do fail miserably, I'll most likely come back the the U.S., attend a Community College, transfer to some University (only if I do well in Community College) and get my degree that way.

I'm just not sure that going to Taiwan right now is the best option for myself.

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"Good-paying job" in Taiwan is almost an oxymoron now unless you are really exceptional in business, technology (hardware or software), or engineering in general. Most young people from Taiwan that are good at what they do, and actually get a decent salary, have already moved to the Mainland.

This man speaks the truth. Taiwan is a great place to visit and have fun. It's def not a place to learn and expect to make a decent living compared to the US (unless you're really exceptional at what you do)

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Hi any one any other new updates on taipei shopping ? Heading to taipei in a week time, hope to look for supreme , visvim and wtaps stuffs. thanks in advance

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True, but believe me, the last thing I'll be doing in Taiwan is "screw around".

Of course I'm different, why would I think otherwise?

The only sure thing going forward for myself is that I'll only be in Taiwan for a year, depending on how well I do in prep school and if I do fail miserably, I'll most likely come back the the U.S., attend a Community College, transfer to some University (only if I do well in Community College) and get my degree that way.

I'm just not sure that going to Taiwan right now is the best option for myself.

If you're set on coming to TW, then do it. You're still young and a year won't make or break you from a long term perspective. But think clearly about your motivation to study in Taiwan and become fluent in Chinese. Is it to work in Taiwan? Is it because you want to date/marry Taiwanese? Is it something else?

If it's because you want to work here, I don't recommend going this route. The unemployment rate for recent college graduates is really high. And if you are fortunate enough to get a job, expect to be paid about 700-900 USD per month which is not gonna be easy to get by on. Also keep in mind that you're competing with locals who native Chinese speakers and have semi-decent English language skills. What differentiates you from them? Your English abilities, right? But also be aware that most entry level jobs don't require English. It's when you get up to management level that you need it. I'm not trying to burst your bubble but there are some realities you need to understand before making this decision.

I went to University in the US, worked, then came to Taiwan to study Chinese at Taida for a year. I have lived and worked in TW for several years now and really love it. I am fortunate that I don't get paid like a local but I could definitely make more in the US. Moreover, I am not even close to being fluent. I speak fluently, can read/write emails, read some articles, etc but if you asked me to write a business proposal in Chinese, I couldn't do it. Not a chance. Written Chinese is significantly different than spoken Chinese. So don't think you'll become fluent just by being here. You really have to work hard. Again, I'm not trying to discourage you but just helping to set your expectations.

Anyway, good luck with your decision.

Edited by schmallo15

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Aye, that's the very reason why my Girlfriend wants to move to the UK, she graduated with an engineering degree from one of the top 3 universities in Taiwan, she went to the UK to do a Masters degree in one of the top 20 years Uni's here, her English is also very good. She's been working for a UK company for the past 2 years, but doesn't have plans to renew her working visa as she needs to go back to tie up some loose ends, selling her flat in Taipei city etc. and amongst other things before finally immigrating to the UK. Even now she's fretting about getting a "decent" job that "pays well" in Taipei City, she feels she has the qualifications and the work experience, but there isn't much out there unless you want to work for one of the big electronic companies out there such as Asus - which many of her peers have done.

She said herself, even an "entry-level" office job in the UK pays a lot more, in some cases double than any equivalent in Taipei. She also feels the job market (even though both countries are pretty bad), the UK can offer more for her.

If you think the grass is greener on the other side, it isn't.

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