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Anyone make their own clothes?

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Material: bamboo lycra

dual layer, elongated sleeves

large patch pockets on both front panels,

reversible RIRI zip.

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It was a modified stock pattern that I used as a starting point for the shirt. I changed certain things like blending sizing, modifying the yoke, using a different type of pocket, rounding the collar tips, and making the tails smaller. It made the fit more simple overall without weird details.

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I've been modifying a stock pattern too. I've changed everything though, including the shape of the armhole, the placement of the shoulder seam, the shape of the body, and the size of the neckband. It's still a work in progress.

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Quarry, where did you source your riri's? I have a project I planned for some tailored sweatpants and I wanted to get some zips.

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Quarry, where did you source your riri's? I have a project I planned for some tailored sweatpants and I wanted to get some zips.

panda

http://www.zipppershop.com/home.htm

or pacific

http://www.yelp.com/biz/pacific-trimmings-new-york

both have a decent selection and will ship if you call and place an order

I usually get mine from panda

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Going to start a new project tomorrow: tailored sweatpants. I took a few inspirations from several designer sweatpants in order to get something I want from my pair. Pics will likely be posted as progress is made and changes are likely to occur as I construct them. I really wanted to do sweatpants with a zipperfly and button closure on front but my instructor said it would be too timely given the amount of time I have left in the class. Im working with Polartec Windproof 200 fleece so its a pretty good year round fabric that is thick enough to function as sweatpants but thin enough to drape nicely. Hardware details to follow, will likely stick with YKK stuff for now.

Inspirations for this: W+H, julius, wjk, polo RL, and various other designer sweatpants.

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Guest redtag

I am not really good at handling needles, scissors, and machines so I could not make my own clothes. There are times when I draw some designs but they end up in trash bins since I am not talented at sewing.

Arms are a little big, other than that the fit is alright for first cut n sew project.

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I commend you for your first try on making this type of clothing. I also noticed the size of the sleeves but you still did a good job all-in-all. Good luck on your next projects!

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Sweatpants getting fitted:

Some details- Polartec 200 fleece in a blue/gray color, Black on black YKK zippers on front panels. More details to follow with better pictures.

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my new pair of bespoke made jeans;

drafted, designed and constructed by me; dior's 19cm inspired fit

13oz, indigo- overdye black kaihara denim - with black top stitching

36" inseam - hem left unhemmed.

inner thigh dart from center crotch point to knee (RO inspired)

button fly front

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Great fit on those, how many hours did they take?

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Great fit on those, how many hours did they take?

to cut and sew - 10 hours

to get the perfect fit/pattern - endless hours.

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to cut and sew - 10 hours

to get the perfect fit/pattern - endless hours.

Those are amazing jeans. Good job. Seriously good job. You must be tall with a 36" inseam. I like the Dior inspired fit and ro details you talked about. The denim looks awesome. Did you break them in a bit already or did they have some kind of coating? It looks like there is some kind of sheen.

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Just bought a Singer industrial!

The lady that sold it to me makes bike accessories for a couple companies. Serendipitous.

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my new pair of bespoke made jeans;

drafted, designed and constructed by me; dior's 19cm inspired fit

13oz, indigo- overdye black kaihara denim - with black top stitching

36" inseam - hem left unhemmed.

inner thigh dart from center crotch point to knee (RO inspired)

button fly front

Where did you get rivets? Every place I've been carries anything you can possibly imagine except jeans rivets.

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Where did you get rivets? Every place I've been carries anything you can possibly imagine except jeans rivets.

there's this shop in my city they carry all the sewnig supplies u can imagine and they happen to have gromets, rivets, jean buttons, snaps, eyelets everything you can imagine. im not sure if they ship and you should see if theres anything similiar where your located, its 'leather and sewing supplies'.

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I'm buying the tools for a first go at some jeans and shirts. Will look like shit, but I have to start somewhere.

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material is bamboo from mood NY, Its definitely too heavy but overall i'm pretty happy with the way this one turned out and the fit is perfect...now looking to source light weight cashmere cotton jersey blend for the final product. waiting on cuttings from a mill in china with low minimums but the price is usd55/kg FOB which seems a bit high for jersey....

if the quality is there, I'll probably end up paying it though because I won't be able to meet 1000 -1500 yd minimums from others .

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Received sample cuttings this week from many various mills and sources for knits and woven articles, averaging a few packages a day full of headers from sources I found through searching thoroughly at some lists of textile trade show exhibitors like Premiere Vision offering relax styles in cotton type, knits and linen fabrics. I arranged an email which I sent out to numerous mills with request for knits and wovens with wool blends and linen blends. Although a broad request, I tried to narrow it the best I could with no specific experience with international textile trade language in regard to a certain product description/specs, like a specific comp, const, width or weight. I simply made a request specific to my minimum and target price for a few styles I am working on, including a pair of trousers which I intend to be made from a suitably light blend of linen and cotton. I also found out that other mills had jersey in stock for bulk in prompt delivery in many colors. Some offering quantities ready in all the colors from 300 mts up. Some others requesting a minimum for bulk 500 yards per order 150 yards per color) etc.

Starting a new project for a pair of twisted trousers made from a nice coated cotton/linen now as I continue other projects near finalization since I have received all these wonderful fabric options now that I could use now. I will try update as the projects moves forward.

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just a heads up before you go ahead with any purchasing..

do you have a factory lined up that will support your mimimun order runs? theres not much money in it for the factories when they are doing the small runs so they will either reject you or charge you a tasty premium. - you are not their favourite type of customer as they want returning trade and easy (many unit) jobs..

most jersey factories for example run on a 300 minimum per style

of course you can find some small factories that will do low minimums, but it just doesnt work out sales wise.

i reccomend clear budgeting before you move forward.. (maybe you are all set though, dont get me wrong - im not saying otherwise, just trying to give some advice)

all the best!

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Yes absolutely, I agree. Many of these facilities are processing more 300 tons of knitted fabric per month with annual turnovers of 10 million + with customers including large buying houses and garment exporters we all know, it would be safe to say that it is not characteristic of overseas manufacturing to produce small runs.

However, not all factories are the same, which i imagine several factors play into this…Some are definitely more permissive to sampling and small production runs than others, but of course it's not easy to figure this out when a typical response from any agent or sale representative regarding minimums is on average of 1000yds/per color, 3000 yds/per order, even for facilities to request 300 per style seems pretty low, obviously these organizations want a customer that buy in high volume simply because that is the nature of their business.

There must be unique circumstances allowing me to be excluded from this generality of premiums and not follow the rules for a small dye lot charge and a small waving charge…what these factors are I don't know but it is something to take advantage of!

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What Im trying to say is there is very little temptation for these mills to take on such small jobs as these orders will be unlikely to result in return orders which the factorys need to operate..

Buy readymade until you have the capacity to properly 'play the bigger game' so to speak

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I've made several garments from stock fabric bought at places like Mood and B&J, to buy from these places of course it's practical for the person sampling a first collection. All I am saying is though this way may more suitable for a person first starting out due to low cost and availability at low volume, is it to this their best advantage? If someone is doing a lot of digging at these places, at best they are settling for a fabric of lower grade leading to a finished product that will probably end up undistinguished because it lacks quality/originality of the fabric. The fact is that any product of originality and quality is very reliant to the use of unique materials...finding ways to create this for yourself is up to you. If your way of conducting business is completely unorthodox, it won't matter if it is done effectively, your product will be a success because it is sufficiently different.

What I've found is that many factories are flexible in ways they take up new clients. Often if you can identify your requirements before potentially moving to higher quantities, sometimes that is all the temptation needed for some factory to work in low volumes. To say you are starting to develop your initial product range is realistic, the factory sees that being flexible is a sensible idea to sampling requirements and will work with you. A factory in China sent me small volumes this way...100 yds each of cotton/cashmere, viscose/linen, cotton/linen jerseys, very unique blends that would never be seen in a store. Whether moving to production very soon is realistic or not, is really unimportant.

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in the us a lot of sewers here will do really small productions... or at least i know we drop off sometimes like four things or six things somewhere... and we've done bigger orders and i've seen way bigger orders they're working on when we go to them. so if you need to do a really small order might want to look into getting it home grown if you're from here (guessing you are?)

if you're making tshirts though idk how much you are trying to sell them for so idk if that makes it worth it.

but then, if you're doing small production you already know this i guess. or at least have thought about it. but maybe you don't know how easy it is to get things cut/sewn in the united states even today...

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in the us a lot of sewers here will do really small productions... or at least i know we drop off sometimes like four things or six things somewhere... and we've done bigger orders and i've seen way bigger orders they're working on when we go to them. so if you need to do a really small order might want to look into getting it home grown if you're from here (guessing you are?)

if you're making tshirts though idk how much you are trying to sell them for so idk if that makes it worth it.

but then, if you're doing small production you already know this i guess. or at least have thought about it. but maybe you don't know how easy it is to get things cut/sewn in the united states even today...

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its a completely different kettle of fish getting fabric mills to make a new fabric to your design and getting a small sample shop to do a 10run order.

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