Jump to content
homi29

The WTF are u doing with your life thread

Recommended Posts

shit, I meant to pos you insted.

ive just literally finished a discursive piece on fashion and art combined, I do enjoy doing the research.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

it helps though, does it not? tell me more journo student?

 

 

It helps to get your hand held through the industry, the essential skills you need need (like how to stay on top of your email/do research and obtain information that may not exactly be accessible through google alone/how to bridge those connections with people like editors who will pay you to do work/how to do your taxes) but by and large your portfolio, and your most recent work will make the case for you to be eventually 'hired' as a staff writer/reporter than what you were studying in undergrad. Yes a journalism degree from a reputable university is a signifier to an employer that you will probably find it easier on your first month on the job than someone else, but experience is a much better teacher.

 

Do you want to be a journalist? I mean a real journalist, not a #fakeimportant mansplainer who contributes to Thought Catalog, has 1,000 followers on twitter, works an 'internship' (slave job) that's only quasi-media related, and eventually wind up doing PR for a start-up or social media or some other bullshit. A journalist has no social life, follows around public relations people, spends all day on Gmail/the phone, and does NOT have a balanced work-life schedule. Oh, and job security is virtually non-existent, you're constantly battling Buzzfeed for internet eyeballs in an attempt to justify the $22/hour you'd be making (that's being generous), all while getting spammed for nearly every spelling error that shows up in your copy because you're also doing the job of copyediting your work, a position that existed in ancient times (2003.)

 

It's important to really define what it is you want to be doing. I want to work at a place like Buzzfeed one day; I don't want to compete with grad students and career journalists for a staff job at the Washington Post, at least not yet. I want to cover things I'm interested in, not municipal politics.

 

If you want to be a journalist, go start doing journalism. You have a Twitter account right? Get one. Get a smartphone. Get a camera (an iPhone 5 or equivalent camera is fine now, by the by), and learn how to compose a picture like the ones you see on A1. Get a legitimate website (your "inspiration" tumblr doesn't count. Nobody gives a fuck that you know how to wear pants), write every day no matter what even if it's two lines about your bullshit roommates eating your peanut butter. You have to write. And you have to read as much as possible. Subscribe to actual magazines and pay attention to the people writing the things you read; they're your industry peers and you should address them as such. Disagree with an oped? Call the writer out on Twitter in a professional manner. Have a discussion with a real journalist. Email them. Let them know you exist, even if it's in a "I'd love to do what you're doing" type of way. It's nearly as important as being able to string a lede together in 4 minutes, as it is to be recognizable, in name, style, beat, and writing ability.

 

Don't fake anything. Nothing is more obvious than reading a piece where the writer themself doesn't understand the subject. Work. There are thousands and thousands of people who want to do what you want to do.

 

I'll never forget doing corporate relations for the GOVERNMENT (a PR mouthpiece job where I wrote press releases for journalists and worked with them directly, but I was really the anti-journalist, framing stuff) and seeing how many applications I was competing against when I got hired. It was approaching four digits. And this was for a summer student temp job.

 

I don't mean to come off as pessimistic (even though I really am), but I've seen the industry for what it is. And yes, if you work hard enough, there is a place for you in it, and in 2014, it's growing. But there's a lot of bullshit lurking, especially at the entrance gate. Ever work a 10 hour shift for free? I have. And I nearly became homeless because of it. That's another thing; save. Your. Pennies. I know a lot of people on sufu are trust fundies who get their tuition paid for, and that's great, but you have to realize the terms of engagement with internships. By and large, they're a crock. I was very fortunate to learn the hard way (through debt and having to pay for my way right from the jump) that if I was going to actually do this, I needed to figure out a way to sustain myself. And I did. But that doesn't mean I got asked to photocopy things and get coffee for the staff of a national magazine for 3 months before I clued in that I wasn't learning anything and was essentially the bitch boy. You'll find those. And you'll also find one or two people who see what's happening, take you under your wing, and mentor you. That's the true value in an internship; the connections you'll make. But despite what your faculty, peers and the companies handling internships might tell you, you can bridge those connections anywhere, at any time. Hang around. Pay attention. More people than you might realize pass you every day.

 

Okay I'm mad rambling now. tl;dr figure out what you want to do in media (find specific people doing what you want to do and MIRROR THE FUCK OUT OF THEM.), learn how to take pictures, write every day, spend at least a half hour a day straight READING. ARTICLES., get twitter, get a real website/portfolio (an excellent opportunity to learn simple web design/coding, a skill that's increasingly more valuable), get a camera and shoot everything, email journalists, participate in journalism, and write as much as fucking possible. Figure out the true value of your time, and from there, go forth amongst internships. But if you're legitimately good at something, unless it's for a favour or a labour of love, never give it away for free. You're a business, man.

 

.02

 

 

EDIT: Dug up a post from Justin Ling that you should absolutely read if you're serious about this freelance rap shit (er, journalism) http://demarchy.ca/post/44971169975/freelance-journalism-the-money-the-job-the-mouse

Edited by its always cloudy

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It helps to get your hand held through the industry, the essential skills you need need (like how to stay on top of your email/do research and obtain information that may not exactly be accessible through google alone/how to bridge those connections with people like editors who will pay you to do work/how to do your taxes) but by and large your portfolio, and your most recent work will make the case for you to be eventually 'hired' as a staff writer/reporter than what you were studying in undergrad. Yes a journalism degree from a reputable university is a signifier to an employer that you will probably find it easier on your first month on the job than someone else, but experience is a much better teacher.

Do you want to be a journalist? I mean a real journalist, not a #fakeimportant mansplainer who contributes to Thought Catalog, has 1,000 followers on twitter, works an 'internship' (slave job) that's only quasi-media related, and eventually wind up doing PR for a start-up or social media or some other bullshit. A journalist has no social life, follows around public relations people, spends all day on Gmail/the phone, and does NOT have a balanced work-life schedule. Oh, and job security is virtually non-existent, you're constantly battling Buzzfeed for internet eyeballs in an attempt to justify the $22/hour you'd be making (that's being generous), all while getting spammed for nearly every spelling error that shows up in your copy because you're also doing the job of copyediting your work, a position that existed in ancient times (2003.)

It's important to really define what it is you want to be doing. I want to work at a place like Buzzfeed one day; I don't want to compete with grad students and career journalists for a staff job at the Washington Post, at least not yet. I want to cover things I'm interested in, not municipal politics.

If you want to be a journalist, go start doing journalism. You have a Twitter account right? Get one. Get a smartphone. Get a camera (an iPhone 5 or equivalent camera is fine now, by the by), and learn how to compose a picture like the ones you see on A1. Get a legitimate website (your "inspiration" tumblr doesn't count. Nobody gives a fuck that you know how to wear pants), write every day no matter what even if it's two lines about your bullshit roommates eating your peanut butter. You have to write. And you have to read as much as possible. Subscribe to actual magazines and pay attention to the people writing the things you read; they're your industry peers and you should address them as such. Disagree with an oped? Call the writer out on Twitter in a professional manner. Have a discussion with a real journalist. Email them. Let them know you exist, even if it's in a "I'd love to do what you're doing" type of way. It's nearly as important as being able to string a lede together in 4 minutes, as it is to be recognizable, in name, style, beat, and writing ability.

Don't fake anything. Nothing is more obvious than reading a piece where the writer themself doesn't understand the subject. Work. There are thousands and thousands of people who want to do what you want to do.

I'll never forget doing corporate relations for the GOVERNMENT (a PR mouthpiece job where I wrote press releases for journalists and worked with them directly, but I was really the anti-journalist, framing stuff) and seeing how many applications I was competing against when I got hired. It was approaching four digits. And this was for a summer student temp job.

I don't mean to come off as pessimistic (even though I really am), but I've seen the industry for what it is. And yes, if you work hard enough, there is a place for you in it, and in 2014, it's growing. But there's a lot of bullshit lurking, especially at the entrance gate. Ever work a 10 hour shift for free? I have. And I nearly became homeless because of it. That's another thing; save. Your. Pennies. I know a lot of people on sufu are trust fundies who get their tuition paid for, and that's great, but you have to realize the terms of engagement with internships. By and large, they're a crock. I was very fortunate to learn the hard way (through debt and having to pay for my way right from the jump) that if I was going to actually do this, I needed to figure out a way to sustain myself. And I did. But that doesn't mean I got asked to photocopy things and get coffee for the staff of a national magazine for 3 months before I clued in that I wasn't learning anything and was essentially the bitch boy. You'll find those. And you'll also find one or two people who see what's happening, take you under your wing, and mentor you. That's the true value in an internship; the connections you'll make. But despite what your faculty, peers and the companies handling internships might tell you, you can bridge those connections anywhere, at any time. Hang around. Pay attention. More people than you might realize pass you every day.

Okay I'm mad rambling now. tl;dr figure out what you want to do in media (find specific people doing what you want to do and MIRROR THE FUCK OUT OF THEM.), learn how to take pictures, write every day, spend at least a half hour a day straight READING. ARTICLES., get twitter, get a real website/portfolio (an excellent opportunity to learn simple web design/coding, a skill that's increasingly more valuable), get a camera and shoot everything, email journalists, participate in journalism, and write as much as fucking possible. Figure out the true value of your time, and from there, go forth amongst internships. But if you're legitimately good at something, unless it's for a favour or a labour of love, never give it away for free. You're a business, man.

.02

EDIT: Dug up a post from Justin Ling that you should absolutely read if you're serious about this freelance rap shit (er, journalism) http://demarchy.ca/post/44971169975/freelance-journalism-the-money-the-job-the-mouse

I really need to get my arse into gear regarding my portfolio, nothing has been 'added' as such, but I gotta take my maths GCSE again due to it being shit (rest is fine), so I have an extra year to get my head down and think.. but how mathematics comes into journalism regarding uni applications, I dunno! suppose universities are inching that 'bar' upwards a little each year for a collection of reasons.

Thats where I get a tad 'wishy washy' regarding my possible future in journalism. writing is my niche I guess. I like it.. do i love it? er, sometimes, I suppose..what I happen to be writing on at that particular time is the basis to the answer. I was just sitting down thinking about how restrictive journalism may be initially and if I could deal with them specific boundaries as such, then my mind was wandering and I thought maybe more hands on route, somewhere my nature can flourish. This is aint a kanye-type rooftop boast, but I DO regard myself as creative.. always been drawing, and I feel like I have alot of 'ideas' of the creative spectrum to give. I make a half-decent researcher when I pull my finger regarding college, and I truly LOVE researching, could do it all day.

I dont actually have Twitter, about the only one I dont have an account to. And I dont read half as much as I should. Fantastic advice though iac, nice one bud.I just did a little simple discursive at college. Gimme yer email and ill send it over to you, and you can have a look when you got 2 secs (1500w).

Edited by Arwhyayen

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I really need to get my arse into gear regarding my portfolio, nothing has been 'added' as such, but I gotta take my maths GCSE again due to it being shit (rest is fine), so I have an extra year to get my head down and think.. but how mathematics comes into journalism regarding uni applications, I dunno! suppose universities are inching that 'bar' upwards a little each year for a collection of reasons.

Thats where I get a tad 'wishy washy' regarding my possible future in journalism. writing is my niche I guess. I like it.. do i love it? er, sometimes, I suppose..what I happen to be writing on at that particular time is the basis to the answer. I was just sitting down thinking about how restrictive journalism may be initially and if I could deal with them specific boundaries as such, then my mind was wandering and I thought maybe more hands on route, somewhere my nature can flourish. This is aint a kanye-type rooftop boast, but I DO regard myself as creative.. always been drawing, and I feel like I have alot of 'ideas' of the creative spectrum to give. I make a half-decent researcher when I pull my finger regarding college, and I truly LOVE researching, could do it all day.

I dont actually have Twitter, about the only one I dont have an account to. And I dont read half as much as I should. Fantastic advice though iac, nice one bud.I just did a little simple discursive at college. Gimme yer email and ill send it over to you, and you can have a look when you got 2 secs (1500w).

 

occupation: creative

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

my girlfriend is a journalist and is actually in the US for a year working at a business journal in colorado. i'm not sure what its like over there, but here (australia) its so competitive for jobs after graduating from uni (unless you studied engineering) that many grads often take months to find work and are unemployed in the meantime or are notoriously 'underemployed'. anyway, she applied and took a position that no one else in the state wanted - a tiny, rural newspaper in the absolute middle of nowhere that paid almost nothing to write about the local primary school's sports day, an old 'famous' koala dying and petrol prices going up and down. not exactly thrilling writing, but she stuck with it and after 2yrs another opportunity came up which then lead to a new job offer by fairfax media (australia's biggest media company) and then an offer in colorado. as mentioned above, throughout the whole process she has stayed incredibly active online - through her blog, facebook, twitter and linkedin. if you don't have a (professional) online presence, no one is going to know about your work.

tldr: we all gotta start somewhere.

edit - i should say i am incredibly proud/jealous of her, as she's only 23 and has been passionate about journalism for a number of years whilst i'm almost 27 and still sorta floating around with a psych degree.

edit x2 - not sure if journalism is for you, you seem to contradict yourself a lot and if you have a portfolio but nothing has been 'added' then it isn't a portfolio - its nothing.

Edited by conqueror

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

i think the point is, as far as journalism (and several career options) goes/go - you need to grind, grind, and grind. it's not going to be flashy, it's going to be bitter and brutal. honestly, taking a journalism course or minoring in journalism is really not a bad idea at all, because it teaches you how to properly structure your research and how to formulate opinions without sounding biased. also you get basic copy/editing insight, a few courses in media, and some computer courses. 

 

as far as a major in journalism - i don't know, i mean a degree is a degree, but i don't know. i think a great idea if you want to set yourself up to be a writer or anything field specific is to get a minor in it, and couple it with a more broad major. that way you get the advantage of casting a wide net, and you have some special skills related to what you want to do.or get an entry level internship and really prove yourself (which will already require an associates at least, so idk, whatever you think works best). journalism happens to work p well as an associates because it implies critical thought and developed research skills. not saying it's the best option, i happen to think it makes a lot of sense. although i think you're better off doing an associates in something first to at least see if you like the coursework, rather than going ahead and declaring a major/minor. idk if you can do that where you live, not sure how the degree plans work. if you can take a few classes here and there before finalizing on what you are fully studying, i would definitely recommend playing around and getting a feel for what you like.

Edited by insted

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

what is your point?

 

dressed by the internet is one thing

occupation by the internet is completely stupid

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

People can lie about advice they give you IRL too, why the stipulation for advice on the internet? The advice given so far seems genuine. 

 

Some of the best advice I've been given for my career change was from online, and a lot of it from complete strangers who had no vested interest in my well being. Of course, I cross referenced a lot of their advice with people I knew personally in the same fields of occupation, and most of it checked out. Any personal experience should be taken with a grain of salt, but could provide valuable information if you're taking the correct things away from them. 

Edited by Method

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

dressed by the internet is one thing

occupation by the internet is completely stupid

never meant to pos you.

for spouting so much garbage.

I never had my possible career choice given to me via internet. I'm a tad stuck and undecided.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

my goal is to do something that my parents never would have dreamed of themselves growing up in poverty in the philippines. when we moved here to america, my dad was almost jobless and had to babysit a kid next door and my mom worked 80 hours a week to get me and my siblings through school. now I'm a senior in college about to start my last semester of nursing school. i'm hoping to go back as soon as i can while i don't have kids, a house to pay for, etc. to get my doctorates to become either a nurse practitioner or nurse anesthetist.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

my goal is to do something that my parents never would have dreamed of themselves growing up in poverty in the philippines. when we moved here to america, my dad was almost jobless and had to babysit a kid next door and my mom worked 80 hours a week to get me and my siblings through school. now I'm a senior in college about to start my last semester of nursing school. i'm hoping to go back as soon as i can while i don't have kids, a house to pay for, etc. to get my doctorates to become either a nurse practitioner or nurse anesthetist.

 

damn man, that's deep shit. sounds like you're working with a great head on your shoulders and an honest drive. your ambition will prove to be your greatest asset. it's funny, when you know what it is you want to do and know how you need to do it, nothing seems impossible or unrealistic.

 

let us know how things are going - your parents deserve to see you thrive, and you owe it to yourself. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

damn man, that's deep shit. sounds like you're working with a great head on your shoulders and an honest drive. your ambition will prove to be your greatest asset. it's funny, when you know what it is you want to do and know how you need to do it, nothing seems impossible or unrealistic.

 

let us know how things are going - your parents deserve to see you thrive, and you owe it to yourself. 

 

yup i owe it to myself to make the most out of my life but i also owe it to my parents to make the most out of the opportunities that they've given me through their sacrifices. and related to what you said about the perception of what's impossible and what not, i remember thinking of a quote when i was up all night studying for a chemistry 101 exam freshman year, something like "it's funny how you lose sleep the more you realize your dreams" or something like that. it's eery how similar they sound.

 

but anyway, i appreciate the kind words. i'll definitely keep you guys in the loop. i figure i'll be around sufu when i start making more $ anyway cause i'm hoping to spend it on clothes i really like lol.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

i graduated with a design degree (media/graphic/web/etc) in 2010 and went on the hunt for agency work, but besides a four month internship at a product design firm, it was a struggle to find any legit jobs. an old friend from middle/high school eventually offered me a job at his car dealership and i jumped on board immediately—being an in-house creative director seemed better than an intern or jr position at an agency. I've been at the company for ~20 months now and gained a ton of experience so far: creating a brand, dealing with vendors, art directing freelancers... basically having creative freedom and a decent-sized budget. but in the end, i've been working in a silo—i'm the one creative in a team of four. the quality and efficiency of my work is plateauing because I'm only getting feedback from salesmen and GMs (who i really enjoy working with but really are in a different mindset, professionally). 

 

all of this, plus the drama of mixing work with friends, plus the fact that i can't ever see myself engaging with "car culture" although i really do appreciate them as design objects, is why i'm going back on the job hunt... I'm leaving my current position as creative director to go find an entry-level job at a design agency, preferably branding or web. it's really sad to leave a company that i was so deeply rooted in, but i feel like i'm back on the right career path. currently preparing my resume and portfolio; applying this week; hopefully getting hired in october..

i should prob just copy paste this all into my cover letter

 

update on wtf i'm doing w my life:

 

so I got hired at the end of october at a really great brand design agency for a three month internship. It was exactly the kind of work I wanted to be doing, at exactly the kind of company I wanted to work for (small, flat, no team-building activity bullshit). I got to be as close to the CEO as any other employee and we built a legit professional relationship; I don't know many companies where an intern could get this kind of attention from the company's owner.

 

The three months are officially up as of last week, but there's not enough work at the company for me to get hired fulltime—even though my boss really does like my work. We had a talk yesterday and figured a way to continue collaborating: I'm gonna be working part time while he helps me setup MY OWN brand design agency! Basically I'll be getting all the clients that want to hire his company but can't afford it. I'm suuper excited and also really scared— he already warned me that I'm gonna be failing/falling a lot during the beginning of the "experiment"(as we're calling it). This is an insanely perfect opportunity for me because I've always wanted to start an agency, but was too daunted by the process of acquiring clients, writing contracts, all that logistic owning-a-business stuff that I've always been deathly afraid of. But I realized that I gotta suck it up and deal with that bullshit if I wanna have big ambitions... take the good with the bad, etc... 

 

I'm thinking of a company name now and starting to build the website later this week... wish me luck  :mellow2:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

phen3n, i checked out your portfolio. the company you interned with is a brand/digial consultancy targeted at startups? seeing as most startups are trying to boostrap and keep everything as lean as possible, how popular is such a service?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

good question, and something we're slowly answering ourselves (the company used to be a general design agency, this is only the 2nd year as a dedicated BRAND design agency). any new company would love to hire an agency to design it's logo, identity, etc, but they usually can't afford it. if the startup has gone through a round of funding, they're usually very happy to spend some of that on branding. Our services are decently popular, especially because design has become such a hot topic within the startup world... it's just a matter of whether they can afford to hire a legit agency instead of their friend/brother/cousin who knows photoshop

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Luisa via Roma (US)
    Privilege Program