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Shoes that look better with age...

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Walk On straight tip boots, glass finish.

These are based on Aldens from the 70s.

 

Beautiful!  Makes me really really happy about the Leather Soul Jump Boot build that was almost a Super Future boot...we obviously came very close to nailing a design directly out of the Alden archives from the 70's.  I know Alden is swamped, but this is just further proof that they have so much brilliant stuff in their archives...wish they would do a little bit more of that, and a little bit less letting shitty shops that have been carrying Alden for +-3 years specify custom runs based on what is supposed to be cool this year.

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Anyone have any experience with WESCO's roughout leather? I'm thinking of ordering a pair of Boss engineer boots in brown roughout.

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I think the machine is cutting the feather, where the upper and welt are sewn onto the insole. This is the original method of Goodyear welting and is still used for bespoke footwear (except the feather is cut by hand) - see e.g. p. 136 of Vass and Molnar, Handmade Shoes for Men. I don't know when the canvas rib was introduced, but the technique - apparently now almost universally used for bench-made shoes - is reliant on very powerful and quick-setting adhesive. 

Thanks for the clarification. I am a huge fan of Laszlo's book, which is such a useful reference book for my work. I bought a pair of Budapest brogued shoes when I visited Budapest this Spring; the quality is superb.

 

Back to the topic, most of the canvas ribs are attached to the insole by using adhesive. But, for many Goodyear welted safety boots, the ribs are not only attached to the insole with glue, but also stitched to the insole, which makes the stitches exposed. But usually, those safety boots are equipped with cushion insert insoles that will cover the insoles and stitches. 

 

Something popped up in my mind while I was typing the words above - the difference between Goodyear welted construction and handsewn welted construction. Many people seem to use "Goodyear" to represent welted shoes. But, for me, Goodyear welted construction and hand-sewn welted construction are different.

 

Hand-sewn welted construction is a traditional shoe-making process that most of jobs are done by hads, including welt-sewing, sole-attaching, and so on. A shoemaker can only produce 1-2 pairs of hand-sewn welted shoes a day. Mr. Laszlo Vass's book - Handmade Shoes for Men - is talking about hand-sewn welted construction.

 

On the other hand, Goodyear welted construction is a shoe-making method based on the same idea as traditional hand-sewn welted construction; the difference lies in machinery replaces the human labors. At the end of 19th century, Charles Goodyear Jr. invented a series of machines to do the jobs that are done by hands originally, which increase the production quantities and lessen the production time greatly. That's also why it's called Goodyear welted construction. Canvas ribs play an important role in the development of Goodyear welted construction. Without the ribs, the needle of welt-stitiching machine cannot punch through the the uppers, lining, welt, and ribs easily at the same time.     

 

However, this is my personal preference. Goodyear or hand-sewn? People can still call whatever they want to  :)

Edited by thinker0217

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Any well worn Cheaney Pennines out there?

Is there any stretch in them? Just tried on a couple of pairs and need to make a decision...

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In fact, I am really curious about whether Wesco/Viberg stitch-down is 100% waterproof because the back half of the boot is nail-down. Is nail-down able to keep the water from penetrating into the boot? That is my question.

 

As for your question about the benefits and drawbacks of either construction. I would say that the Wesco/Viberg stitch-down needs more work done by hand as half of the shoes is nail-down. On the other hand, most of the stitch jobs (welt stitching and sole stitching) of Veldtschoen/Goodyear are done by machines. That is, the production time of Wesco/Viberg Stitch-down would probably takes longer than Veldtschoen (Goodyear) does. 

 

But, I don't know how to define whether it's benefit or drawback. For me, they are different shoe-making process based on similar idea. 

 

I suspect the main difference between the two constructions, the Wesco/Viberg stitch-down and the veldt, is when the boot is surrounded by moisture, i.e. when submerged in a muddy puddle or walking through snow or a dewy field.

 

I reckon that in rainy conditions the two are as good as each other, but the 360 veldt build, combined with the bellows tongue and suitable leather, would be better in the field, hence the name 'field shoe' as a translation of 'veldtschoen'. Explains why, traditionally, veldt boots are often seen as being shooting boots or field boots, and the shoes have often been used as golfing shoes.

 

Thanks for sharing your knowledge, by the way!

 

 

Any well worn Cheaney Pennines out there?

Is there any stretch in them? Just tried on a couple of pairs and need to make a decision...

 

I wouldn't count on any stretch in a boot like the Pennine, mate...go for the larger if in doubt.

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Thanks for the clarification. I am a huge fan of Laszlo's book, which is such a useful reference book for my work. I bought a pair of Budapest brogued shoes when I visited Budapest this Spring; the quality is superb.

 

Back to the topic, most of the canvas ribs are attached to the insole by using adhesive. But, for many Goodyear welted safety boots, the ribs are not only attached to the insole with glue, but also stitched to the insole, which makes the stitches exposed. But usually, those safety boots are equipped with cushion insert insoles that will cover the insoles and stitches. 

 

Something popped up in my mind while I was typing the words above - the difference between Goodyear welted construction and handsewn welted construction. Many people seem to use "Goodyear" to represent welted shoes. But, for me, Goodyear welted construction and hand-sewn welted construction are different.

 

Hand-sewn welted construction is a traditional shoe-making process that most of jobs are done by hads, including welt-sewing, sole-attaching, and so on. A shoemaker can only produce 1-2 pairs of hand-sewn welted shoes a day. Mr. Laszlo Vass's book - Handmade Shoes for Men - is talking about hand-sewn welted construction.

 

On the other hand, Goodyear welted construction is a shoe-making method based on the same idea as traditional hand-sewn welted construction; the difference lies in machinery replaces the human labors. At the end of 19th century, Charles Goodyear Jr. invented a series of machines to do the jobs that are done by hands originally, which increase the production quantities and lessen the production time greatly. That's also why it's called Goodyear welted construction. Canvas ribs play an important role in the development of Goodyear welted construction. Without the ribs, the needle of welt-stitiching machine cannot punch through the the uppers, lining, welt, and ribs easily at the same time.     

 

However, this is my personal preference. Goodyear or hand-sewn? People can still call whatever they want to  :)

I think you're correct in making this distinction between hand-sewn and Goodyear - clearly hand-sewn shoes would not have been described as 'Goodyear-welted' before Mr Goodyear had invented and patented his machines. But whether the original machines relied on the use of a canvas rib, or more closely followed the hand-sewn technique, only a shoe-historian can say.

 

Going back to the Vass book, it's a fount of wisdom (for me, at any rate), although I suspect each bespoke shoe maker has his own slightly different technique, and they certainly don't all make their own lasts starting from a block of wood. I know of at least one, and I suspect there are many others, who start with an ordinary Spring Line last and file it down as required, or build it up with patches of leather here and there.

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Context is taking pre-orders on this new collaboration with Oak Street Bootmakers...basically it's a natural shell cordovan trench boot. I'm thinking about pulling the trigger, but I have no experience with either Oak Street or Shell Cordovan boots...SO...just wondering what some of you who do have experience think of these?  Thanks...

 

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Haven't worn a pair of Oakstreet, but handled them in Vegas, looked at a few models of the Trench boot, and were a great boot. 

 

 

To the Whites people, did you go with curve or block heel? I have been reading some things saying block heel doesn't work with the bounty last. What difference does it make from the block?

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There's no "bounty" last .... just SJ on SD last. 'Really comes down to personal style & taste.

IMO, on std heel height, std Cuban is best in looks & function

Edited by BrownMetallic

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Sorry, got it mixed up there. I was thinking of getting 1/4" reduced. 

 

But how does it differ in function? (first timer here)

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The back edge of the block heel sits almost a full inch back compared to a cuban heel.  This is going to effect the way your foot strikes the ground with each step, so you'll probably have noticeable heel drag compared to the cuban heel.

 

Plus it just seems silly to mess with a design that's been successful aesthetically and functionally for ~100yrs.  In my opinion there's no point to buying White's unless you're getting the fit and look gave the brand their fame and respect.  Block heels make a lot more sense on lower profile casual boots like Indy's and service boots.

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I have been reading through the SF whites thread, and read what you just said there a year or so ago about the same thing. I will go with cuban, as in all of my shoes I always wear the back corners out quite fast as I drag my heels, so I am glad I asked this.

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Got myself a pair of Wolverines 1000miles boots. What would u guys use to protect this boots from water?

Also, what do u guys wear with boots? Like types of shirts. 

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On the Whites heel issue, my thoughts have always been the same as Hollows, I have Bounty Hunters with the standard "Cuban" heel and love them.

Last year a friend gifted me some SD's with block heel and I can honestly say that I have not experienced any heel drag in them.

From a personal style POV though I would always go with the standard heel.

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Edit: double post.

Edited by Megatron1505

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on the train on my way home

 

10039261494_409cb20047.jpg
IMG_20131001_052340 by SLAB13, on Flickr

 

 

Alden Indy and FC 1108c

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Anybody else's White's SD/BH with the Vibram composition half sole squeaking really loudly?

 

Mine developed a squeak after around a year of wear and now they are obnoxiously loud. I think it's coming from between the midsole and outsole; it doesn't matter what surface I am walking on (wood, concrete, carpet), the squeak is equally loud and I can feel it underfoot on both feet.

 

There's still plenty of life left on the soles, so I guess I'm stuck with squeaky boots until they're resoled...

 

Until then, I'll have to remember not to wear them around libraries and churches!

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Here you go...

 


I just wanted to post a little self-centered post for you guys. You may recall (probably not) that I picked up a pair of White's SD about a month and a half ago. I loved them intensely right out of the box, and they only got better and better with every passing day. About three weeks in, my left boot started squeaking. I ignored it at first, but upon closer inspection, I realized the arch in the left boot was actually shifting, which has worsened with time. I can now rock the whole arch back and forth by shifting my weight, and I also believe the arch has actually shifted, which is KILLING my feet haha.

White's, of course, has been super easy to deal with and are giving me no hassle with returning them and assured me they would push my replacement boots through the assembly process as soon as they determine that there is indeed a flaw with the boots... I'll keep you updated on how they handle this pretty serious fuck up.
 

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Peter- That issue with White's has been raised on here before, if i recall it is caused by the arch shifting.

I have White's SD with the vibram half sole and mine squeaked for a couple of months after a year or so, and then stopped again.

Mine only really squeaked on waxed/tiled or vinyl floors though so somewhat different. I think it can develop as the sole wears down and moves against the floor when you walk.

 

Perhaps yours is due to a loosening of the bond between mid and half sole (stretching of the thread or shrinking and drying out of the leather) and them moving slightly against each other - I remember reading somewhere that the 8 stitch that some cobblers use on a half sole helps with stability and whites dont use that.....

Do you rotate the boots and always let them dry naturally and not store them near a heat source?

 

or more worryingly as 00 quoted the shaft could be moving - worth investigating.

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Monkey Boots

 

Rising Sun has these nice ones made by Julian in two different colours made from French calf leather.

A_LINESMANBOOT_BROWN_1126_grande.jpg?206

 

Tnen there are these by Julian sold in Japan (cowhide).

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JoeMcCoy offers these Ten Mile ones- They seem to change slightly from year to year.

ma12005-13fw.jpg

ma12005-030_1.jpg

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ma12005-050_1.jpg

ma12005-050_2.jpg

 

Then there's Rolling Dub Trio

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And of course the Lone Wolf Wireman

img57143128.jpg

img57143119.jpg

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