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cargo khaki is stupidly consistent across materials. my canvas sfb boots are practically identical to my tech fleece.

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cargo khaki is stupidly consistent across materials. my canvas sfb boots are practically identical to my tech fleece.

That's good to hear—guess I'm buying the alpine jacket in cargo khaki.

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I think the color is the same color as the cargo khaki on the most recent lupineks. Who knows though—really digging those flyknit tallacs though.

 

 

cargo khaki is stupidly consistent across materials. my canvas sfb boots are practically identical to my tech fleece.

 

Ah, think I might opt for the black version then.

Not sure on the length but I guess I'll see that soon enough.

I wonder how well it'll sell, if I remember correctly the main outerwear from last season sold out quickly

Edited by Yoshiii

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The cargo pants sold out in moments, but there was a restock. 

For the summer season they limited shorts to 1 per person. My workaround was to wait until my order moved to shipped,

then buy another pair, the available stock lasted for weeks SS drop.

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Can anyone from Asia confirm if ACG sizes are the same as US sizes?  US M = Asia M or US M = Asia S etc

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Anyone know of a techwear-ish alternative to Adidas track pants? Specifically I'm looking for something baggy around both the waist and ankles, drawstring, polyester/spandex, and relatively warm. These are perfect in every way (just got a very casual new job with no dress code) except for the white stripes down the side :( -- looking for something less gaudy.

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Hey guys, I was looking at the softs x ccp technical riding pants at softs online store, but since it's all in Japanese it's a bit hard to navigate even using Google Translate. The main thing I'm worried about is if I can even buy from them being outside of Japan (In the U.S.), so does anyone have experience buying from them? I'd really like to get my hands on them but it seems a little bit difficult at this point.

I'm even going to Japan late December to mid January, but looking at their location on their website it doesn't seem like they have an actual store, and that might just be where they operate out of.

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you are probably not going to be able to buy from them and have it shipped. you need to use a proxy service. just google japan shopping proxy and pick one.

l use fromjapan.com they have english website and its easy to set a buying request there. Used them many times and always good. You can even adjust the value written on the shipping parcel so you save on stupid duties.

l tried suto corp as well but they screwed the custom order, no matter how hard they advertise here l cannot recommend them.

Edited by danii

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If you can figure out the ordering system, in Japan you can have them delivered to a Lawson/Family Mart/any convenience store

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I'm a t e c h w e a r b o i, but I want to ask, besides aesthetic is there any real difference between techwear and stuff from an army surplus store? When looking at acronym specifically they add a lot of features but the increase in price definitely accounts for more than that (not saying that that is bad)

 

I realize that techwear in part is a style and that is why there is an increase in cost and I am okay with that, I'm just wondering if the fabrics/clothes themselves are any different from something you could get from an army surplus store.

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Super disappointed that none of the new ACG pants have belt loops, deal breaker for sure.

 

what's the consensus on sizing, simliar to ACR (ie. you choose based on length, not waist size?). Judging by the pictures, the pants seem very short. I know models tend to be really tall, but the Nike sizing guide is useless so really hard to judge.

 

I have been looking for slim-fit cargo for a bit and the ACG khaki cargo are pretty much what I'm looking for, except for the lack of belt loop (could do without the branding on the pocket too, but not a deal breaker). I'm sort of a 32ish waist so while I can fit into Acronym Medium pants, the length is a bit short (I'm 6') so I go with Large instead and use a belt. Anyway, given the lack of belt loop on these, trying to figure out whether I should bother getting a pair tomorrow and if so, what size so any advice appreciated

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teachwear blog worthy^^^

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Wow, where to begin.  

 

One big fundamental difference is that mil surplus is exactly that: surplus.  This is usually a result of the military replacing and updating their equipment...this inherently means that the surplus that lands at your local shop is outdated in lots of ways ("technology" mostly), sometimes by several years (even decades!).  Equipment isn't updated all too frequently en masse in the military, so the surplus has already been sitting with the military for years before it is deemed surplus for stores, then it'll sit in stores for potentially years until a customer happens upon it.  Take down insulation for example: definitely warm but is basically useless once wet, so the military (AFAIK) has discontinued its use for God knows how long, yet down parkas are still in healthy supply at the shops I've been to.

 

Add to that, surplus is also often the lowest common denominator of military equipment, i.e. what the 99% of the military uses, not the 1% (e.g. special operations units).  That's why the majority of what you find are bulky metal canteens, uncomfortable backpacks, plain cotton BDU's, etc.--because that's what most of the military uses (and therefore buys, and therefore have surplus of).  The real advancement in mil-gear is within the specops stuff, for example Polartec developed the Alpha insulation (which is great BTW) directly for and with US Special Forces pretty recently, but you'll never find this at a surplus store because the 99% doesn't get this level of equipment.

 

And that's just the fundamental ways government-issued/funded gear differs from private (e.g. Acronym).  If you want to get away from the macro-fundamentals and get to the micro, build quality is insanely different: zippers, buttons, etc. will again be the LCD for government-issued while Acronym can use the best.  Pattern-making and articulation too is so different that it's almost not worth comparing because the differences are night and day.  Fabrics used are an obvious delineation (usually find cheap polyester/nylon shells at milsurplus, never GTX, and if you somehow did find GTX at milsurplus I'd bet money it wouldn't be GTX Pro).

 

Yeah, there's the issue of style points with ACR, but that is an extremely facile and shallow distinction.

Great post. Technical fabrics, among other technological advances, can attribute a lot of development to defense spending. I remember someone made an off-hand comment about war being the reason we have Acronym—I think with regard to a lot of technology it's humbling to consider that many developments happened as a result of trying to make killing our fellow man more efficient.

Another thing: in some cases milsurp can result in great value with regard to recent revisions sold by soldiers: e.g. the most recent the ECWCS (extended cold weather clothing system/extended cold warfighter clothing system) pieces. These have primaloft, climashield, polartec thermal pro/powerdry, Gore-Tex/ Windstopper, et cetera. They also have more sizing: short, medium, long. Lots of ex GI-Joes trying to make a quick buck.

EDITED FOR ACCURACY/CLARITY :)

Edited by CARLOOA

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Technical fabrics, like most technological advances, are spearheaded by military. I remember someone made an off-hand comment about war being the reason we have Acronym—I think with regard to a lot of technology it's humbling to consider that the developments happened as a result of trying to make killing our fellow man more efficient.

 

Not really, no. Gore-tex for example was not spear-headed by the military. Innovations in technical fabrics are driven in part by the Outdoor industry, Sportswear etc. And Errolson/Acronym got their start designing for Burton (snowboarding stuff). The military does have an influence (particularly surplus on style) but this meme that we wouldn't have techwear in not for war is ridiculous. 

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Hey guys, I was looking at the softs x ccp technical riding pants at softs online store, but since it's all in Japanese it's a bit hard to navigate even using Google Translate. The main thing I'm worried about is if I can even buy from them being outside of Japan (In the U.S.), so does anyone have experience buying from them? I'd really like to get my hands on them but it seems a little bit difficult at this point.

I'm even going to Japan late December to mid January, but looking at their location on their website it doesn't seem like they have an actual store, and that might just be where they operate out of.

 

I'd recommend emailing either softs or ccp for the items you're interested in. I bought the coach jacket directly from ccp through email and megu-san was very responsive.

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Not really, no. Gore-tex for example was not spear-headed by the military. Innovations in technical fabrics are driven in part by the Outdoor industry, Sportswear etc. And Errolson/Acronym got their start designing for Burton (snowboarding stuff). The military does have an influence (particularly surplus on style) but this meme that we wouldn't have techwear in not for war is ridiculous. 

Let me rephrase, a good portion of cutting-edge/disruptive fabric development is funded by defense spending. Is that narrow enough for you?  :) 

DARPA spends a good amount of money at DuPont, North Face, Arcteryx, WL Gore, etc.

Edited by CARLOOA

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@danii
Thanks, I actually use FromJapan myself but I never realized I could use it for a store like this (I mainly use it for Yahoo Japan Auctions).

@donburi
Thanks, that might work, too, but I'll probably stick to FromJapan if I end up ordering it.

@halomunkey
That's pretty cool. I'll consider that. Thank you!

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the war/acrnm comment wasn't about technical fabrics, it was about 90% of the acr-aesthetic being derived from military clothing. Hell, a significant amount of their pieces are redesigned military items. 

 

i wouldn't say .mil spending 'drives' fabric innovation (although gore has been on a roll lately) but it certainly plays a major part in keeping the market afloat. The ECWCS programme alone runs in the literal billions, and that's just a tiny chunk of overall technical clothing spending by the US .gov alone. aramid development is a multi-billion dollar industry. gore's gov programme is gigantic. patagonia holds huge developmental contracts with ussocom, to the point where they opened a separate production facility.

In addition to that there's the berry amendment, mandating that government contracts give preference to domestic suppliers which has kept US textile and garment production economically relevant.

 

In any case i don't see the problem in admitting that acr (or in a lesser amount, veilance) has a significant martial component. There's always been a martial influence on clothing, both stylistically, practically and economically.

Edited by Inkinsurgent

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and it's not just recent trend in techwear that takes bits and pieces from military garments. historically most patterns and even styles were based on what the army was wearing before. there is a quite neat thesis on military influence on fashion here:

http://commons.emich.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1167&context=theses

 

also surplus plays huge role in it. especially upcycling military surplus.

 

so again, military inspired/reworked garments were here before acronym or any other brand.

Edited by danii

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and it's not just recent trend in techwear that takes bits and pieces from military garments. historically most patterns and even styles were based on what the army was wearing before. there is a quite neat thesis on military influence on fashion here:

http://commons.emich.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1167&context=theses

 

William Gibson's novel, Zero History, uses this history as a major plot device.

 

(tip: if you haven't read the book, but plan to, do not read the Wikipedia page, it's full of spoilers)

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the war/acrnm comment wasn't about technical fabrics, it was about 90% of the acr-aesthetic being derived from military clothing.

:huh2:  ...?

I replied to Carlooa's post before his edit (and here's the comment he was offhandedly referencing):

 

Technical fabrics, like most technological advances, are spearheaded by military. I remember someone made an off-hand comment about war being the reason we have Acronym—I think with regard to a lot of technology it's humbling to consider that the developments happened as a result of trying to make killing our fellow man more efficient.

DISCLAIMER: SARCASM

 

so maybe we should all really be thankful for the conflict humans have with each other, which drives us to the point of destruction and ending lives, bc w/o that, would any of this even exist?

 

~ apologies if i've offended anyone

not sure where you're getting the idea that I think the military does not an influence on clothing.

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I got that impression because this is the original quote, which is about aesthetics. 

 

also, speaking as a veteran, you'll find most of these designs (stoney/acr/insert military aesthetic inspired brand here) in archives of military uniforms from across the world in some shape or form (going back hundreds of years). so maybe we should all really be thankful for the conflict humans have with each other, which drives us to the point of destruction and ending lives, bc w/o that, would any of this even exist?

 

The rest of the post does not disagree per se with the notion that techwear is not primarily driven by the .mil (which i agree it isn't), but it does elaborate on the extent to which the .mil  influences techwear. Which is far greater than many people presuppose. 

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I got that impression because this is the original quote, which is about aesthetics. 

 

 

The rest of the post does not disagree per se with the notion that techwear is not primarily driven by the .mil (which i agree it isn't), but it does elaborate on the extent to which the .mil  influences techwear. Which is far greater than many people presuppose. 

Let's be thankful for conflict because destruction necessitates creation.  :)

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Does anyone know if nikelab releases by pst or est?

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What does everyone think of the ACG stuff?

Went in store earlier to see it and was slightly underwhelmed.

I liked the Alpine jacket but I'm not sure about spending £500 on it. The bomber doesn't arrive till tomorrow so I'll have to pop back for that.

The cargo's are nice, the shape seems really good but the black ones aren't black, more like a very dark blue. I don't know why Nike's trousers never actually come out black black

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