Jump to content
rnrswitch

Freewheelers, Bootleggers Reunion, Bubo, etc.

Recommended Posts

27 minutes ago, dudewuttheheck said:

They also used to be seen around DB all the time and recently seemed to have disappeared.

Much like half the posts 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
16 minutes ago, Duke Mantee said:

Much like half the posts 

Maybe that's why we can't see the shirts anymore

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That wabash chambray fabric is awesome.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 minutes ago, JDelage said:

That wabash chambray fabric is awesome.

About the closest I’ve seen to the original stuff

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
35 minutes ago, dudewuttheheck said:

Maybe that's why we can't see the shirts anymore

What shirts?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

Some folk have been asking about availability of Freewheelers stuff. Generally the older an item the less likely it will be available - same as every brand really; but for a bit of help I’ll explain the Lot or Label number ( @Broark asked me to include this along with the description of my shirts for easy web searching) - that means you’ll at least know how old or new the item is
 

FD9E70AD-8B55-4487-9498-E59B76FB5C4C.jpeg
 

Since 2010, the Lot Number has comprised of 7 digits- prior to then it was 6 digits. The breakdown is as follows:

 

a)   First two digits denote the year of production - e.g. 2016 lot numbers will commence 16 (2009 was merely 9 and not 09 hence six digit lot numbers prior to 2010)

 

b)   The third digit represents the ‘season’. There are 4 categories (which obviously aren’t all seasons) 

1 = Permanent Product (this means an item which will appear regularly BUT not every year)

2 = Spring/Summer

3 = Fall/Winter

4 = Special issue (mostly stuff for me)

 

c)   The fourth digit represents the product type. There are 8 categories in this section

1 = Jackets, Coats (which also includes vests and leather products generally)

2 = Pants/trousers

3 = Shirts

4 = Sweatshirts and associated products

5 = T-shirts(all sleeve lengths generally)

6 = Knitwear

7 = Dry Goods(hats, caps etc.)

8 = Special issue


d)   The last three digits are simply the item number in that particular collection

 

So you can see my Oregon Trail was the 8th coat/jacket style released in late 2010 ... easy :smile:

Edited by Duke Mantee

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Duke Mantee said:

Everything - is the easy answer

The patterns are slightly different, the Bakehead was derived from the Neal as a nod towards the growing western market who were seen to prefer a more ‘fitted’ work shirt (one of my pet peeves I mentioned elsewhere)

 

I sold my Neal, i would def have another one but i would buy my regular size (38/M) everyone convinced me i needed a 16/L and the sleeves fitted ok, the length was passable but there was way too much material around the body, i wouldn't want it to be 'fitted' as such i would just want it to fit, a shirt around 20" P-P is a nice relaxed fit for my body shape.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Duke Mantee said:

Right, this next batch should take us to 80 shirts ... nearly there

Freewheelers Jesse, Vintage Flannel Check, Red x Cream #1823003

1823003 Jesse.jpg

Dont know if l like this shirt because of the fact it is very similar to a 1950's Wrangler shirt, or because l am really digging the FW flannels generally. 

Hey l have a few shirts and rarely wear them but as l am starting to turn into humpty dumpty around the waistline, l think a shirt better might disguise the ensuing beer baby. Keep em coming!

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, Double 0 Soul said:

I sold my Neal, i would def have another one but i would buy my regular size (38/M) everyone convinced me i needed a 16/L and the sleeves fitted ok, the length was passable but there was way too much material around the body, i wouldn't want it to be 'fitted' as such i would just want it to fit, a shirt around 20" P-P is a nice relaxed fit for my body shape.

Wearing something that fits and wearing something that’s fitted can be two different things. You’re talking about the first one.

I’ve seen far too many instances of a (work) shirt chosen and worn clearly based on nothing but p-2-p ... the shoulder seams sitting way up on the clavicle, sleeves too short, collars not able to fasten, buttons under tension - and sometimes all of that. Crazy stuff.

Fashion being what it is I know you won’t have everyone looking from the same perspective - but for me a work shirt, except for the rare exception, isn’t going to be tight ... or fitted

Edited by Duke Mantee

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I actually prefer a slightly short sleeve on a work shirt if i'm wearing them for work... working with my hands, if the sleeves are too long the cuffs get trashed but i suppose most 'workshirts' are worn in an office environment.

..but i know what you mean, i see a lot of deck jackets that folks are unable to button all the way up, you would think this a necessity for a winter jacket.. i have a fairly regular/straight body shape, i don't need to accomodate girth, broad shoulders or a wide chest so i can often choose a shirt based on not much more than p-p and shoulder width.

Only time i failed, i bought a BR CPO in size 38 and it was perfect to within milimeters and these were actual mm not those mm @Flash talks about ;) the only problem was the collar felt slightly tight on my throat when buttoned all the way up so i swapped it with Kaj for his 40 and it was way too big... regrets.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
29 minutes ago, Dr_Heech said:

Dont know if l like this shirt because of the fact it is very similar to a 1950's Wrangler shirt, or because l am really digging the FW flannels generally. 

Hey l have a few shirts and rarely wear them but as l am starting to turn into humpty dumpty around the waistline, l think a shirt better might disguise the ensuing beer baby. Keep em coming!

 

Have you got a pic or two of that example Doc? Generally I think the wranglers come with a different pattern of yoke but the colour combination is a classic

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

work clothes with short-ish sleeves have historical precedent (I know post overalls chores used to have relatively short sleeves on that front...) -off topic but recent big yank acquisition was based on the sleeve cuff - can be rolled to a much more variation of lengths than most... pic related (crop from Saunders Militaria of a plaid version)

but yes: a work shirt that cannot button at throat is anathema (it is what prevented the purchase of a warehouse longhorn western shirt; the 42/xl right everywhere else but not at that crucial top button...)

 

cuff.png

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, Double 0 Soul said:

I actually prefer a slightly short sleeve on a work shirt if i'm wearing them for work... working with my hands, if the sleeves are too long the cuffs get trashed but i suppose most 'workshirts' are worn in an office environment.

..but i know what you mean, i see a lot of deck jackets that folks are unable to button all the way up, you would think this a necessity for a winter jacket.. i have a fairly regular/straight body shape, i don't need to accomodate girth, broad shoulders or a wide chest so i can often choose a shirt based on not much more than p-p and shoulder width.

Only time i failed, i bought a BR CPO in size 38 and it was perfect to within milimeters and these were actual mm not those mm @Flash talks about ;) the only problem was the collar felt slightly tight on my throat when buttoned all the way up so i swapped it with Kaj for his 40 and it was way too big... regrets.

 

Safety first with sleeve length Neal :wink:

I think that’s the issue in my mind - modern work shirts i.e. office shirts are transmogrified into rugged wear ... same shirt (even to the point of putting chest pockets in the wrong place) different fabric, funny enough a more traditional formal shirt will have plenty of chest room.

Like I said, it is (was) just a fashion thing ... and I stopped being fashionable after I realised how much of a dick I looked wearing John Richmond Destroy :laugh2:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 minutes ago, bartlebyyphonics said:

work clothes with short-ish sleeves have historical precedent

 

Tis true

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 minutes ago, bartlebyyphonics said:

work clothes with short-ish sleeves have historical precedent (I know post overalls chores used to have relatively short sleeves on that front...) -off topic but recent big yank acquisition was based on the sleeve cuff - can be rolled to a much more variation of lengths than most... pic related (crop from Saunders Militaria of a plaid version)

but yes: a work shirt that cannot button at throat is anathema (it is what prevented the purchase of a warehouse longhorn western shirt; the 42/xl right everywhere else but not at that crucial top button...)

 

cuff.png

My Freewheelers NPR is based on that Big Yank pattern - cuffs, pockets etc

8079EA2D-D85F-4755-AE01-53098437B87F.jpeg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Duke Mantee said:

Have you got a pic or two of that example Doc? Generally I think the wranglers come with a different pattern of yoke but the colour combination is a classic

No l dont have an example to hand, but it was the pocket shapes that gave me the wrangler vibe. You're probably right about the yoke shapes being different. 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Such a bunch of nerds :D (said in a good way)

I’ve been nodding along, enjoying the exchanges and links... much as with the CSF mm et al forensics recently (not sure when that was, the days are becoming a continuum)... good stuff gents...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
3 hours ago, Duke Mantee said:

Wearing something that fits and wearing something that’s fitted can be two different things [...]

I’ve seen far too many instances of a (work) shirt chosen and worn clearly based on nothing but p-2-p ... the shoulder seams sitting way up on the clavicle, sleeves too short, collars not able to fasten, buttons under tension [...]

Fashion being what it is I know you won’t have everyone looking from the same perspective - but for me a work shirt, except for the rare exception, isn’t going to be tight ... or fitted

amen, again, with examples... (first by John Vachon, second and third Russell Lee - taken from book 'Bound for Glory')

some of my pet issues: shoulder seams should be on (or ever so slightly below) shoulder, never higher ... this man has it right...

IMG_2647.JPG

workshirts should be snug in the arm length yet generous in the body... 

IMG_2648.JPG

pockets, if period correct, should be the right height, which can vary; but if it is low; keep it low... - see this one below third button, nice and low (and that is my grail fit... no squeezed in sausage meat... just drape and freedom of movement): so many great examples of this proper pocket placement from duke's freewheeler's showcase... (so many 'cigarette pocket' repros ignore this from just a cursory search)

IMG_2649.JPG

Edited by bartlebyyphonics

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As someone who does not appreciate collar tabs, I'm fascinated by the collar tabs on the Engineer, Brakeman, and Ironall shirt. They have a button on the tab, button hole side, so that the wearer can fold over the tab when not needed. Very cool. Here's an example on the Ironall, thanks to Klamp on Rakuten:

 

compass1587115424.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, bartlebyyphonics said:

amen, again, with examples... (first by John Vachon, second and third Russell Lee - taken from book 'Bound for Glory')

some of my pet issues: shoulder seams should be on (or ever so slightly below) shoulder, never higher ... this man has it right...

workshirts should be snug in the arm length yet generous in the body... 

pockets, if period correct, should be the right height, which can vary; but if it is low; keep it low... - see this one below third button, nice and low (and that is my grail fit... no squeezed in sausage meat... just drape and freedom of movement): so many great examples of this proper pocket placement from duke's freewheeler's showcase... (so many 'cigarette pocket' repros ignore this from just a cursory search)

 

Perfect

now @Iron Horse can add more by way of detail ...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@Iron Horse such awesomeness; love these old pictures 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A modern day right and wrong IMHO - the wrong being the trendy western interpretation 

58F34818-2FC6-4DA8-A654-3A299B7FC914.jpeg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

So let’s get up to 90 (that’s all I have access to - the rest are in another location about a pandemic away) ... and continuing the theme @Iron Horse has expanded for us, here’s the original Neal Cassady which has the pre lawsuit label (yep, everyone from Levi’s to the Cassady family has had a go at FW). Bryan - what’s your thoughts on this pattern which FW says is based on a 1930’s work shirt? Note the Neal only has 6 buttons, I think a lot of your references have 7. Anyways ...

Freewheelers Neal Cassady Rail Road, Vintage Chambray, Indigo #0533006 (but actually from the Spring 2010 collection)

0533006 Neal.jpg

Edited by Duke Mantee

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 minutes ago, Double 0 Soul said:

I wouldn't consider that fit to be trendy or western, it's just too small for him.

It is - but I think the model/shop/photographer doesn’t think that :wink:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, Duke Mantee said:

It is - but I think the model/shop/photographer doesn’t think that :wink:

I reckon the model feels as uncomfortable as he looks

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Freewheelers Dylan, Vintage Selvage Yarn-dyed Chambray, Wine #1523012

1523012 Dylan Wine.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now